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  • Rabies ?

    A lady told me today that a vet told her that you could get rabies from walking through where a skunk had sprayed? Never heard of this, just sounded a bit odd. Alot of the people I meet at training are a bit excentric. Anyone ever hear of this?
    ~~Everyone is entitled to my opinion!~~

  • #2
    Rabies is a virus transmitted through bodily fluids so maybe if you had a fresh bad cut on your foot and walked barefoot through fresh skunk spray you might have a small chance of catching it. Probably have a better chance of winning the lotto.
    Last edited by kwpgrooming; 02-06-10, 09:58 PM.

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    • #3
      No, skunk spray is NOT considered a rabies exposure. Found this information from this site: http://www.ianrpubs.unl.edu/epublic/...licationId=864
      Lisa VanVleet, RVT

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      • #4
        Rabies is transmitted through saliva, CSF (cerebrospinal fluid), and infected tissue. You could roll in skunk spray and be safe! Although Idk why you would want to, lol. Also, the rabies virus is fragile and can only survive outside the host's body for a couple seconds however, the virus can survive inside a dead infected animal for more than 48 hours.

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        • #5
          Hmmm, I'm not sure about that, it might could be possible.

          When I had to go to the hospital for rabies exposure shots the doc told me that you can get rabies from inhaling the dander from a rabid animal. I'm not sure if it's true or not, but I thought it was interesting.

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          • #6
            Well that does it! I am NEVER walking thru skunk spray again. Ever.
            Often it's not what you say, but how you say it.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 4Sibes View Post
              Well that does it! I am NEVER walking thru skunk spray again. Ever.
              Me either! And I guess rolling on a dead animal is out too. What the heck am I going to do for fun now?
              SheilaB from SC

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              • #8
                You usually have to be bitten by a rabid animal to get rabies. It's in the saliva. Skunks, bats and raccoons are one of the highest infected animals, in our area any way. Maybe the women misunderstood.

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                • #9
                  Wow..I'm not grooming skunks anymore...I'm done with that!!! lol

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                  • #10
                    i used to work with bats and i took a few Rabies courses. The only way to get rabies is to get bit by a rabid animal. There was one strange instance in a cave years ago, but how often are you deep inside a bat cave? You can touch a dead animal that was rabid. the virus died as soon as the host dies. The CDC will say you can get rabies by being scratched by a rabid animal but still trying to figure out how, unless the animal spits on it's claws before scratching you. Anyone who works with mammals should read up on Rabies. l

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ColleenT View Post
                      i used to work with bats and i took a few Rabies courses. The only way to get rabies is to get bit by a rabid animal. There was one strange instance in a cave years ago, but how often are you deep inside a bat cave? You can touch a dead animal that was rabid. the virus died as soon as the host dies. The CDC will say you can get rabies by being scratched by a rabid animal but still trying to figure out how, unless the animal spits on it's claws before scratching you. Anyone who works with mammals should read up on Rabies. l
                      Colleen, I believe blood transmission is also possible. Contact with blood of an infected animal that enters your body via cuts, scratches, mouth or eyes. Spray, not likely.
                      <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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                      • #12
                        i imagine that would also work, but not sure how often you and a bloody rabid animal are touching wounds together. I mean yes it could happen, but how likely would it be? I think if you are going to handle any wild animal you need to be wearing Chimney gloves and taking a lot of precautions, especially with feral cats. In our area there are more rabid cats than bats according to the last rabies class I took. Just be smart, people. Don't handle any animal you are not comfortable handling. There are wildlife specialists there for a reason.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ColleenT View Post
                          i used to work with bats and i took a few Rabies courses. The only way to get rabies is to get bit by a rabid animal. There was one strange instance in a cave years ago, but how often are you deep inside a bat cave? You can touch a dead animal that was rabid. the virus died as soon as the host dies. The CDC will say you can get rabies by being scratched by a rabid animal but still trying to figure out how, unless the animal spits on it's claws before scratching you. Anyone who works with mammals should read up on Rabies. l
                          This isn't entirely accurate. The CDC reported 3 cases of rabies transfer during organ transplant; three recipients, same donor. All of the transplant patients died. And I remember, I believe it was in the '70s, a case where rabies was transmitted during a cornea transplant.

                          There's also an aerosolized form, usually seen in laboratory settings. I believe that is the same situation as what is suspected to have happened in the bat cave.

                          Rabies can also be transmitted through saliva, even if the animal doesn't bite you. If you have an open sore, for example. And a vet tech I know was exposed when a rabid dog suddenly went furious and was thrashing wildly around. A drop of the dog's salive hit him in the eye.
                          Last edited by Helly; 02-08-10, 10:27 AM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ColleenT View Post
                            I think if you are going to handle any wild animal you need to be wearing Chimney gloves and taking a lot of precautions, especially with feral cats.
                            Being vaccinated against rabies yourself, prolly wouldn't be such a bad idea either.
                            Often it's not what you say, but how you say it.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Helly View Post
                              This isn't entirely accurate. The CDC reported 3 cases of rabies transfer during organ transplant;... A drop of the dog's salive hit him in the eye.
                              You are right.

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