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NeXaband know-it-alls. A question for ya.

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  • NeXaband know-it-alls. A question for ya.

    I am putting together a first aid kit and can't find out...at what temp does Nexaband freeze...or.... is rendered useless? Any idear?
    ( And don't refer me to the literature...why do ya think I'm asking here? Lit got ate.)

    I would have posted in my "Dumb Questions" thread...but I need to get this kit together in the next 24 hours. TIA, Sibes
    Often it's not what you say, but how you say it.

  • #2
    http://www.wpiinc.com/pdf/msds-nexaband.pdf

    Freezing Point: Not Determined

    Number 9 on page 4

    Scott

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    • #3
      I'm no expert, but I did look up the MSDS for Cyanoacrylate (the generic name for Nexaband):

      Appearance: colourless liquid with a distinctive odour
      Melting point: -22 C
      Boiling point: 54 - 56 C at 3 mm Hg
      Vapour density:
      Vapour pressure:
      Density (g cm-3): 1.06
      Flash point: 181 F
      Explosion limits:
      Autoignition temperature:
      Water solubility:

      With the melting point being -22C (-7.6F), I would think the product would be fine unless it reaches that temp.

      Here's an interesting little tidbit of info I found on Wikipedia:

      Reaction with cotton
      Applying cyanoacrylate to materials made of cotton or wool (such as cotton swabs, cotton balls, and certain yarns or fabrics) results in a powerful, rapid exothermic reaction. The heat released may cause minor burns, and if enough cyanoacrylate is used, the reaction is capable of igniting the cotton product, as well as releasing irritating vapor in the form of white smoke.[4]

      Material Safety Data Sheets for cyanoacrylate instruct users not to wear cotton or wool clothing, especially cotton gloves, when applying or handling cyanoacrylates.
      "The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go." ~Dr. Seuss

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      • #4
        Thank you Scott. You are awesome in a major way. Saving Little Ponys, and the occassional Sibe.
        Often it's not what you say, but how you say it.

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        • #5
          the msds sheets says to protect it from freezing and extreme heat, but does not list a freezing point. so if you are traveling with it in extreme cold, then keep it wrapped up in something to maintain temp as far from the freezing point as you can.
          Certified Master Pet Tech Pet CPR, First Aid and Care Instructor
          "Compassion will cure more sins than condemnation." Henry Ward Beecher US Congregational Minister 1813-1887

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          • #6
            dumb question

            I don't have Nexaband, never used it, but is it that necessary to have on hand? This is tissue glue right? If you had to use it on a pet, wouldn't that make a wound more difficult to treat, or get cleaned or keep clean? Or would you be using this for the incident of preventing a dog from bleeding out?

            I am just curious, or is this something you would keep on hand for yourself in the event that you were bitten very badly. Please forgive me for the stupid question

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            • #7
              I thought I recognized that name. It's Super Glue. http://www.howstuffworks.com/question695.htm
              "We are all ignorant--we merely have different areas of specialization."~Anonymous
              People, PLEASE..It's ONLY a website!~Me

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              • #8
                http://www.made-in-china.com/showroo...e-KX-20P-.html

                Product Description

                Percent Volatiles Not determined
                pH @ 25 C Not available
                Specific Gravity 1.05
                Appearance Colorless liquid
                Autoignition Temperature 485 deg C
                Boiling Point 62 deg C (5 mm Hg)
                Vapor Density (Air=1) > 1
                Vapor Pressure, mm Hg @ 20 C 0.13 (@ 20 deg C)
                Evaporation Rate (Butyl Acetate=1) < 1
                Upper/Lower Flammable Limits Not available
                Up/Lower Explosive Limits, % by Vol Not available
                Flash Point 83 deg C (CC)
                Freezing Point < -20 deg C
                Odor Irritating
                Odor Threshold, ppm Not available
                Solubility in Water Negligible
                Coefficient of Water/Oil Distrib. Not applicable


                Signed,

                Smart AND Pretty!
                "We are all ignorant--we merely have different areas of specialization."~Anonymous
                People, PLEASE..It's ONLY a website!~Me

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Crystal View Post
                  I don't have Nexaband, never used it, but is it that necessary to have on hand? This is tissue glue right? If you had to use it on a pet, wouldn't that make a wound more difficult to treat, or get cleaned or keep clean? Or would you be using this for the incident of preventing a dog from bleeding out?

                  I am just curious, or is this something you would keep on hand for yourself in the event that you were bitten very badly. Please forgive me for the stupid question
                  ALL good questions.
                  It is "tissue glue". The use of it would be very specific to the "situation".
                  My "situation" involves running sled dogs many miles from veterinary care, in a first aid scenario, w/ an injury that necessitates immediate closer to make sure it doesn't "go worse", and after proper steps are taken to clean before closing. And...it has to be a specific type of cut, w/ rather clean lines. Never used to prevent "bleeding out", as the product is not designed to be "buried" in a wound.

                  I've always had it on hand for the Huskies and their "adventures" (and I know how to use it), and would never consider using it on a client's dog. That would be a pressure wrap and rush to the vet if that type of slice were to happen.

                  I've always wondered about the "bitten" part for myself...but I've never been bitten THAT badly (yet) and 'round here, Docs are reluctant to close bite wounds.

                  Actually...I keep wondering if I should try it on those horrible splits/cracks I get in the Winter on my scissoring callouses? One of these days.........


                  Yes Smarten...I do believe it's Super Glue...packaged in a much more expensive wrap.
                  Often it's not what you say, but how you say it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    there is a difference between the formulas of Nexaband and Superglue. The chemicals in Nexaband seal wounds like small slices (clipper or scissor) without harming the skin. Superglue chemicals tend to damage the skin because it gets "hot" chemically.

                    THey aer great in the salon for small nicks and cute on YOU and the dogs or cats. My first job at a vet clinic the vet taught me how to glue small cuts. If its not large enough for a stitch, mainly the vets will glue it. As for dog bites, NO do not glue, do not stitch. They NEED to drain. They heal from the inside out. Gluing it will prevent that. The only time there are stitches in bites is when the area is split and will not heal. Stitches are better because they allow drainaige whereas Gluing does not.

                    Scissor slices are another great candidate for Nexaband, which does not sting as bad as superglue. It holds the skin together allowing it to heal faster and not sting like it does with it untreated.

                    They use Nexaband after nueters, circumcisions, minor surgical procedures and many facial injuries because it scars less and heals faster.
                    <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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                    • #11
                      If you don't have the Nexaband stuff on hand, Superglue is a great alternative. Last week Cyrus managed to slice the heck out of his pad while we were running in the back field. I tried pressure, sugar, corn starch, ice.....wouldn't stop. Of course I have no styptic at home ;-( A little dab of Superglue and it stopped immediately!

                      I use superglue on myself pretty regularly, especially in the winter when I get those horrible, painful cracks on my fingertips. I don't think it burns at all and in fact seems to make the cuts hurt less. I wonder if it's because it seals up the nerve endings.

                      I have tried the Nexa stuff as well and the only difference I noticed was the price. Oh yeah, the glue I use isn't even Super Glue but a cheap dollar store knock off....lol
                      SheilaB from SC

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                      • #12
                        Where can you buy Nexaband?? I looked at Walmart & Walgreens....

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                        • #13
                          the important thing to remember when using nexaband is that the area is cleaned and dried before putting it on.
                          Certified Master Pet Tech Pet CPR, First Aid and Care Instructor
                          "Compassion will cure more sins than condemnation." Henry Ward Beecher US Congregational Minister 1813-1887

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Plexi View Post
                            Where can you buy Nexaband?? I looked at Walmart & Walgreens....
                            I've only ever purchased it through catalogs. I forget where I got my last batch....maybe Jeffers Pet Supply or some livestock catalog? It has a relatively long shelf life.

                            Another thing I'd like to mention, in keeping w/ WChi's good advice...is this is one product that I HIGHLY recommend reading through all the printed literature as to how to apply....BEFORE you ever find yourself in a position to actually need it. Be familiar w/ the application process.
                            It is not like gluing handle back on a teacup.
                            Often it's not what you say, but how you say it.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by 4Sibes View Post
                              .
                              It is not like gluing handle back on a teacup.
                              LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL That was too funny Sibes!!!

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