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  • poodle ears/powder

    so... i was just talking to a customer she says that her breeder was telling her that the ear powder i use is causing her poodles ear infection (this poodle has had ear problems since it was a puppy) she says that her breeder suggested she get ?animal essentials? ear lotion and put it in the ears the day before i come to pluck the ear hair and this will help clear up infection?

    any comments, suggestions, or cures?

  • #2
    My best suggestion for you and this owner as well, after you have plucked the ears and then cleaned them.Have the owner clean them between grooming's as well,also if this dog is prone to ear infections they should be having a vet check and treat this not the breeder.

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    • #3
      If the dog truly has "infection" in the ears, I do not even touch them until a vet has treated them and given the go ahead.
      Often it's not what you say, but how you say it.

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      • #4
        Sibes is right. If the ears are infected, or look infected, don't touch them. Advise your client not to touch them either until a vet has looked at them. Explain that an infection needs medical treatment, and the vet needs to see the ears "as is."

        And I'd also stop plucking! There's a very real chance that the plucking is part of the problem. Plucking causes irritation and opens the follicles, which in turn may "weep" or even bleed. That provides a perfect growing medium for bacteria and fungi.

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        • #5
          Just curious, what are they feeding?
          What does a dog do on it's day off?

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          • #6
            When i worked for a vet he did not allow any ear powder to be used at all because he said he found it was getting packed down inside the dogs ears. He saw many dogs from other salons coming in with this problem. He and all the other vets there were firm believers in plucking the hair, so even with ear infections he would have me pluck it. The one time I didn't touch the ears the one vet reprimanded me telling me it would be a cold day in he** that someone could clean a dogs ears well enough that she couldn't diagnose an infection. So sometimes you are danged if you do and danged of you don't. Different vets have very differing opinions on this. I would hate a client to take a dog to a vet and have the vet tell her the groomer wasn't doing her job because she didn't touch the ears, so I would just make sure you explain completely why you are leaving the ears alone if you choose to do that.
            What a caterpillar considers the end of his world, we call a butterfly.

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            • #7
              Mylady, that vet may have been able to look in the ears and tell they were infected, but I seriously douby she could have gotten a swab that would help her diagnose what type of infection it was. And if she had to do a culture and sensitivity? Good luck on that one.

              I think the day is coming when more and more vets realize that plucking is usually not necessary, and it can do more harm than good. And personally, I'm not afraid to tell a vet that if he/she thinks the ears need to be plucked, go right ahead and pluck them. It's not my job.

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              • #8
                I am finding a lot of vets tell clients that the groomer should pluck the ears mind you the vet will not pluck ears when a dog has onfected ears but tell the client to take the dog to the groomer to do it!Mind you some of these dogs have been in many times with ear infection you tell the client they go to the vet the vet ignores it or the dog has just had a vet check before I see it and has an infection the vet didn't notice. I use minimal powder to pluck just enough to get a grip as it does tend to migrate into the lower ear canal. I have seen a lot of dogs lately who have been getting treated by the vet for infections that are not clearing up IMO it is due to the overuse of antibiotics int he food supply. Many Americans are expereincing the same problem as their pets. I have been telling customers about the old blue powder remedy as many are getting desperate to cure the ear infections. Anyone who has tried has seemed to have success. I tell people that I am not a vet just that it was an old rememdy from before anitbiotics and might be worth a try. I even used it on my dog and it cleared up an ear infection. Several of the dogs whose owners tried it had been getting their dogs treated for a year at the vets with no success. It's just a suggestion to allow them to explore the possibility.

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                • #9
                  I was also taught by a former employer (vet) how to flush the ears I also use a foaming ear wash and an ear drying solution after the bath.As others have stated opinions vary with different vets.Fortunately Both vets I have worked for have had the same opinion and have encouraged My way of practice .The use of good products for maintaining ear health makes a world of difference.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Helly View Post
                    Mylady, that vet may have been able to look in the ears and tell they were infected, but I seriously douby she could have gotten a swab that would help her diagnose what type of infection it was. And if she had to do a culture and sensitivity? Good luck on that one.

                    Actually she was referring to being able to swab the ear. I had told her I didn't want to put any ear cleaner in the ear and she told me it wouldn't have made any difference in culturing the ear. And I will be perfectly honest, I didn't like this vet nor did I ever trust her with any of my animals. I am not saying she was right, just that there is at least one vet out there, LOL, that feels this way, so there may be more. She treated the staff horribly. When I found a tumor on a Springer I was grooming that the vet had diagnosed with Springer Rage I tried to quietly pull her aside and tell her to be careful because she wouldn't even look at the chart before "diving in" to the exam and she verbally berated me in front of the owner and the other techs for trying to tell her how to do her job. So I don't exactly trust much of what she ever told me. She told me later though that I probably saved the dogs life by catching what turned out to be a malignant tumor before it got too big and spread. Never apologized for her rude behavior of course. Heaven forbid I try to help someone protect themselves! Sorry, got a little OT there. It's just amazing some of the things that vets will say and/or do. of course, that's probably true in just about every profession.
                    What a caterpillar considers the end of his world, we call a butterfly.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Helly View Post
                      And I'd also stop plucking! There's a very real chance that the plucking is part of the problem. Plucking causes irritation and opens the follicles, which in turn may "weep" or even bleed. That provides a perfect growing medium for bacteria and fungi.
                      Helly, I have a sincere question:

                      How can you get an ear actually [b]clean[/b] if it's full of hair? The hair will retain the wax and dirt. I know, I've tried it. Sometimes a whole wad of buildup will come out with the hair, it can't be good for it to be in there.

                      I would agree that certain hair pulling techniques might do more harm than good, especially if the ear is extremely hairy (as in some poodles/mixes). Some people rip the hair out violently, or the ear is sooo packed with hair that pulling it all at one time would really irritate things.

                      I pull hair all the time from the canal, but pretty much only from the canal, and work it out "teasingly" so that I minimize the irritation. I am sure to use cleanser after that too, but I can't in good conscience ignore an ear that is packed with hair holding all that dirty wax. Not pulling it only allows more dirt to accumulate and less air to circulate, imo.
                      A Light exists in Spring, Not present on the Year, At any other period -- When March is scarcely here...~~ Emily Dickensen~~

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                      • #12
                        How long has it been since last "pull or not to pull" thread?


                        I don't pluck and I don't have any issue cleaning ears unless they have build up from infection, than they go to teh vet for diagnosis and plucking/cleaning and i insist taht owners ask for pain meds too.
                        How do you get ears clean on Goldens, GSD, Long haired Dachshunds?They all have very hairy ear leathers that gets dirty.
                        I use Magic Ear by CC. Put couple drops in ear and ear leather if it is dirty before bath and massage the canal. Dog shakes have of teh dirt out and I wipe the rest. Hair doesn't get in the way.
                        I don't know if it is true for all dogs but my poo, poo x and cocker spaniel grow hair only at the upper end of the ear canal. I have seen it with my eyes during their annual exams where digital ottoscope was used. I don't pluck ears on my poos, if it looks to me that it gets too long, I trim it as close to the ear opening as possible and we are done.
                        A had a new client who wanted me to try placking her dogs ears because her old groomer could not do it and their vet told them that dog keeps getting ear infections because groomer doesn't pluck them. I with their vet looked for real cause of infection because the dog didn't only inflamed yeasty ears, his whole body was covered by yeasty spots as well with toes and butt being in as bad shape as his ears. I wondered if systemic yeast infection was caused by groomer not plucking the ears as well. Turns out the vet diagnosed the spots on the dog as allergies that they could not do anything about but made owners bring the dog in for sedated ear plucking every three months.
                        I had send the dog with horribly infected ears to the vet after the grooming.
                        So, I don't care what the vets say about me not plucking and causing something.

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