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  • Perscription Shampoos

    A groomer alert. When a client brings in a vet perscribed shampoo be very careful! If you read the cautions on many of the shampoos the bottle warns about cancer causing ingredients. Be sure to wear gloves , especially pregnant groomers. I am no longer going to use these in my shop, I will use hypo shampoo and let the people bathe the dog in the vet's shampoo at home.

    Stephen: You should also require written instructions from the vet to follow. Follow them, groomers have gotten hit sometimes for not using them properly etc. Just follow the written proof.

  • #2
    what type of prescription shampoos are you seeeing?

    geez, that sounds scary, just what are in the ingredients? my biggest issue with the vet shampoos is that that they are horrible for actually getting a dog clean. i almost always use a professional shampoo 1st and then do a second bath with the "vet shampoo".

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    • #3
      I took Chris Pawlasky's (sp???) seminar on bathing in February. She told us that the vet prescribed shampoo should be used first (let it set for 10 minutes) and then bathe the dog in a hypo shampoo to get it clean. The medicated shampoo apparently softens and releases the skin cells and the hypo cleans the skin.

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      • #4
        What types of shampoos are you refereing to? I get several "vet" shampoos like Chlorahexadine, Benzoil Peroxide and Relief (which is oatmeal). I never thought of these as hazardous guess I need to read the labels more closely. I always follow the directions on the bottle which usually simply specifies a 5-10 minute soak. I also wash first in one of my shampoos, usually hypo. BTW, I also have a gallon of my own Chlorahexadine shampoo which I get from Davis and I think you can also order the Benzoil Peroxide shampoos. Are these the kinds you are meaning, or are you talking about tar based or shampoos for manges (I am not going to even try to spell them this early...lol).
        SheilaB from SC

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        • #5
          Are you talking about the perscription Allergy shampoos and the like?

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          • #6
            I totally agree, catgirl.

            The other issue with vet-prescribed shampoos is they are for SHORT term use, usually weekly or every other week for 6-8 weeks, to cure a specific skin problem. They are NOT intended for longterm use, or for grooming use; there is NO benefit to using a vet shampoo on pets we see once every 6-8 weeks. I sometimes wonder if veterinarians even TELL clients that when they sell them the shampoos.

            And there is very little risk of us getting cancer from these products. In most cases, ingredients found to be carcinogenic in labratory testing are applied (or fed) in much higher doses to the test animals, than what we would EVER get exposed to--even in decades of grooming. The test animals are given the megadoses of the "dangerous" ingredient daily for months; they do not just receive the correct dosage under the normal circumstances in which the product will be used. To avoid these obnoxious class-action lawsuits, the researchers have to find the WORST possible scenario by over-dosing their test subjects.

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            • #7
              You know as long as you have the ingredient and can spell it you can do an EPA search on their wed site it is quite informitive! they give you the break down of the entire study, health concerns, lenght the study was conducted and on whay type of animals it was testd on and enviromental hazards ect!!!!!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by PoodlePal View Post
                I took Chris Pawlasky's (sp???) seminar on bathing in February. She told us that the vet prescribed shampoo should be used first (let it set for 10 minutes) and then bathe the dog in a hypo shampoo to get it clean. The medicated shampoo apparently softens and releases the skin cells and the hypo cleans the skin.
                I would think this would be entirely dependent on what type of shampoo is being used, and what the mode of action is. Like chlorhexadine shampoo, as opposed to a keratolytic one.

                It makes sense to use a keratolytic shampoo first, then follow up with a hypo shampoo. On the other hand, an antibacterial or antifungal shampoo? I'd think it would be best to get the dog clean, then use the medicated shampoo.

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                • #9
                  Shampoos

                  Helly,

                  I agree with you on shampooing with a non-med shampoo first, then using the medicated one. I did a lot of the bathing at the vet where I used to work and this is exactly what I did. I used a mild shampoo first (we used PearLyte), rinsed well, then used the medicated shampoo last and allowed it to sit for the time recommended on the bottle (typically 10-15 minutes). I would think that it would benefit the animal best if the medicated shampoo was used last

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