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  • Point cutting?

    I was wondering if anyone else uses the point cutting technique? It's something I know hair dressers use, one taught it to me to help me do my daughters bangs. It helps make the line blend and look more natural. I tend to use it on dogs with more "human" type hair, like Yorkies. Just wondering. It's kind of hard for me to describe it, maybe someone else who knows it can explain it better, but I'll try. Kind of cutting into the hair with the tips of the shears, little by little. Kind of makes little "V"s in the hair. Does that make any sense to anyone?
    What a caterpillar considers the end of his world, we call a butterfly.

  • #2
    Originally posted by mylady View Post
    I was wondering if anyone else uses the point cutting technique? It's something I know hair dressers use, one taught it to me to help me do my daughters bangs. It helps make the line blend and look more natural. I tend to use it on dogs with more "human" type hair, like Yorkies. Just wondering. It's kind of hard for me to describe it, maybe someone else who knows it can explain it better, but I'll try. Kind of cutting into the hair with the tips of the shears, little by little. Kind of makes little "V"s in the hair. Does that make any sense to anyone?
    I do this on drop coat tails to take length off but make it still appear natural ... never have/not sure how to do this elsewhere on a dog.

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    • #3
      I know just what your talking about. I have not tried this on dogs hair I'd be Leary about trimming with the tips(I hardly ever use the tips of my shears) but you kinda get similar effects from thinning shears only tighter staggers instead of actual V's. to be honest I don't know how the v's would look as I am used to getting all of the hairs to look the same length all over even if they are not.Cutting human hair and dog hair truly are opposites when it comes to outcome.example when cutting human hair each cut is defined by how the hair lays.with dog hair its not only about how the hair lays it also is determined by how the hair stands during movement.while scissoring dog hair we fluff out the coat so we can see what hairs may stick out of proportion.then trim those hairs down to match the desired length we repeat this until we get it just right.
      personally I find it much harder to teach a hair stylist how to groom as they are taught to pluck with the shears as we are taught to be floating with ours.just thought I'd toss that in lol

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      • #4
        Yes I have and hope to again

        John Stazko taught that at seminars many years back. I have used it on Yorkies, Maltese, shih Tzus and such type fur.


        I also like to lift the fur with a comb and use thinning shears on the ends, or use thinners on a beard where they don't want it short but not so long or bushy.
        Last edited by Jenneversage64; 11-30-09, 08:59 AM.

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        • #5
          YES ! I do this often, if you are having issues with using just your points you may want to try using pinking shears as well in the same direction ( vertical or slightly angled to the lay of the hair) I recently hired a good groomer, handles dogs well, knows scissor work very well.. only issue is.. still has the 'plastic' finished groom attitude. Had a golden come in the other day, just a light neaten up... scissored the entire dog! Owner calls back and complains that the dogs hair was all scissored off.... It is sad really.. a very hard habit to break.. but not every owner wants their pet looking 'plastic' many want the more natural look..like nothing really was done, it just grew that way and this technique is fantastic for that!

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          • #6
            I learned this at a Melissa Verplank seminar, I use this method to shorten schnauzer beards and still make them look natural. Works like a charm!

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            • #7
              I believe Melissa VerPlank has a youtube video on using this technique on tails. I looked for it, but can't find it right now, but I know I've watched it before.

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              • #8
                I'm glad I'm not the only one LOL, though I doubted I was! When I do it, like on a Yorkie Teddy bear head, I will comb the hair up and hold it between my fingers like a hair dresser so if I cut any skin, it's going to be mine! I do this on the top of the head a lot, and then when I let it fall there are no hard lines and it blends so nicely. I also do it on Cavalier feet when the owners want it tightened up but still look natural. The only decent pair of blenders I have aren't working right and haven't since I bought them. Even though they are under warranty I keep forgetting to send them back for a replacement.
                What a caterpillar considers the end of his world, we call a butterfly.

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                • #9
                  Yes

                  But not too often. Sometimes I use thinning shears on heads with the same technique. I always like to try something different.

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                  • #10
                    I've tried it

                    but feel safer using ts...pull the hair out horizontally and thin the ends. Also on heads. You are NOT ALONE!! :-)

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