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  • How do you deal with this?

    Hi all,
    I had a dog go into a seizure at work last week. I've had it happen before, but mostly to older dogs, or dog's known to have seizures. This dog though was a 9ish month old pup. I did what I always do which is immediately release the leash from his neck, I picked him up (I was careful to keep him from my face, I know that a dog in a seizure can bite), and soothed him. I petted him, and talked in a calm low voice (I think that a higher pitched voice would freak him out). The seizure lasted longer than others that I have seen (45 seconds maybe? others I have seen only lasted 10 or 20 seconds) When it stopped I held him a little longer, I wrapped him in an warm towel. He was still shaking quite a bit, so I put him in a small cage, with towels, and put towels over top so that he was in a warm, quiet, and dark place. I called his mom, and she came and picked him up.
    I was wondering what those of you that have had dogs seize what do you do? Especially when it's a bit unexpected like with this young dog.
    Is there anything that can be done to stop it sooner, or does it just have to run it's course?
    Thanks all!
    Scratch a dog and you'll find a permanent job. ~Franklin P. Jones

  • #2
    It has to run it's course. I wouldn't have left him unattended. He probably urinated on himself (as can be common), lay him on table or floor (depending on dog size) and his side if he is convulsing. If he it is a petit mal seizure, soft voice and tenderness is the right thing to do.

    Make sure to watch him, repetative seizures can occur so monitoring is important. Also, time them, a seizure lasting too long is bad and immediate vet care is needed.

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    • #3
      I had a doxie have a seizure about a month ago here. He was just sitting in his cage staring at me when I noticed he just didnt look right. He is usually VERY hyper. I took him out, checked him over and let it run its course. He was back to his normal yappy self in no time. I told the owner, turns out he had done that at home but they werent sure what he was doing. He is only 2.

      I keep my cages in the groom room so I can see them - I was so glad on that day!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Gracy Rose View Post
        It has to run it's course. I wouldn't have left him unattended. He probably urinated on himself (as can be common), lay him on table or floor (depending on dog size) and his side if he is convulsing. If he it is a petit mal seizure, soft voice and tenderness is the right thing to do.

        Make sure to watch him, repetative seizures can occur so monitoring is important. Also, time them, a seizure lasting too long is bad and immediate vet care is needed.
        I forgot to mention that I brought the cage in the room that I was in, so he wasn't unattended. I checked on him many times.

        Also, you said to time them because they can be too long, do you know how long we're talking. I think that this one lasted about 45 seconds or so.
        Scratch a dog and you'll find a permanent job. ~Franklin P. Jones

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        • #5
          I've seen this happen twice at former shops. Both times the dog laid itself down on the table & we just gently held it until it stopped seizing, so as to keep it from hurting itself. The groomer in charge at the time did not tell the owner until they came to pick it up after grooming. I thought that was horrible & would want to know immediately. So I think you did the right thing by calling ASAP.

          Now my mother has a GSD who siezes only once a year, each time in October. ONLY then, for years. They have no idea why, but this year they're going to put him on meds in September to try & beat it. It's very scary!

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          • #6
            I have a poodle that seizures, you did the right thing. Was this dog cage dried?? It could have been heat stroke. Be very careful if you cage dry, especially puppies.

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            • #7
              seizures

              I groom a 14 yr old poodle that has had a couple seizures at different times after her owners dropped her off. The first time I wasn't sure if it was a seizure or not, but then when she did it the next time she came in I figured for sure that is what was happening. I talked with her owners about it, and they still want me to keep grooming her even after she seizes (when it's over of course)...It makes me so nervous!! I've just been trying to take her in now when the shop is semi quiet and I only have her in an hour tops just to try to keep her stress level down - even still it makes me so uncomfortable. Both the seizures she had lasted probably 30-35 seconds each. I don't take my eyes off of her now. To the owners knowledge these are the only 2 seizures she's ever had...And both of them happened when she was with me...Jus my luck!! Sorry I don't have any great advice for ya Luaren, I did read in my pet first aid chart that it says to comfort them and talk to them in a soft voice using their name and keeping away from their mouth until the seizure subsides. So to me, it sounded like you did the right thing. It is what I would have done too.

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              • #8
                I have two epileptic dogs. My beagle, and one of my chis. I hate when they seizure. It is so hard to watch. Mine both have them for minutes usually at least 5-7. THe vet said to watch to make sure they aren't going over 10 minutes. I would watch putting warm stuff on a dog the seizures. Usually thier body temp gets high. I actually have to put ice packs on the lower spinal area of mine to help bring them out of it. I only had one dog seizure when I was working on it, and it happened in the tub. I called the owner immediatly and they came right back for him. He was an old dog and actually ended up being put down a month or two later

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by baddog View Post
                  I have a poodle that seizures, you did the right thing. Was this dog cage dried?? It could have been heat stroke. Be very careful if you cage dry, especially puppies.
                  Nope, I had barely started on him. He had been there maybe half an hour, little less. I was just preclipping.
                  (I don't use heat dryers)
                  Scratch a dog and you'll find a permanent job. ~Franklin P. Jones

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Grinch View Post
                    I have two epileptic dogs. My beagle, and one of my chis. I hate when they seizure. It is so hard to watch. Mine both have them for minutes usually at least 5-7. THe vet said to watch to make sure they aren't going over 10 minutes. I would watch putting warm stuff on a dog the seizures. Usually thier body temp gets high. I actually have to put ice packs on the lower spinal area of mine to help bring them out of it. I only had one dog seizure when I was working on it, and it happened in the tub. I called the owner immediatly and they came right back for him. He was an old dog and actually ended up being put down a month or two later
                    Ok, so 45 seconds isn't long as I was thinking, lol. Definitely not 10 minutes.

                    Thanks for the advice about the warm towel. It wasn't really all that warm, and it was after he had seized and was starting to calm down. Thank you anyway though because now if it were to happen again I would know to avoid that!
                    Scratch a dog and you'll find a permanent job. ~Franklin P. Jones

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                    • #11
                      Depending on the type of seizure, I usually just put them on a blanket on the floor, turn the lights off, turn off any dryers, radio, etc, and let it run it's course. Any external stimulation can extend the seizure, even petting and talking to the animal. I reserve that for the resolution stage, when they're coming out of it, and acting confused and disoriented.

                      I also second the no warm towels advice. I wouldn't even cover them with a room temp towel. All that muscular activity can significantly raise body temperature. If necessary apply cool, damp towels to the groin and ears. Also avoid ice packs. They can cause blood vessels to constrict, diverting blood flow away from the area. In turn, the blood isn't being cooled, so you're defeating the purpose.

                      You also need to be aware of focal seizures, which are much harder to identify, and more likely to get you bitten. One of the more common type of focal seizure involves "fly biting"...snapping at bugs that aren't there. If the dog isn't in danger of falling off the table, just step back and wait it out.

                      I do call the owner if a dog seizes, and call their vet if the owner requests it.

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