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  • Too soon to move?

    I opened my new salon On Dec 12th 2006 in a small shopping center. On Feb. 15th my neighbor asked if would mind moving to the space on the other side of me. He said that he would pay for my build out and that I wouldn't be out of pocket for any expense or inconvenienced. I know its not far but should I be offered an incentive? I mean I will have to call and change all my bills and now my business cards and postcards are incorrect. I will only lose about 200 sq ft. not much.

    Any advice?

  • #2
    What reason would you move? why did he ask that of you? How long is your lease for? need more info...but I surely wouldn't move just to make things easier for someone else...you're talkn alot of changes...and money!!

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    • #3
      explain that to your neighbor, that you would be out a lot if you move and see what they offer.
      If your dog is fat, you are not getting enough exercise!

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      • #4
        If the neighbor will PAY for your business cards and postcards to be re-printed, and you don't mind losing 200 sq. feet (are you sure that's not a big loss?), then why not?

        WAIT, one more thing: Will your phone number change? I'm sure you can move it with you. The address wont be a big deal, in my opinion, as you'll be very close by, people will see your sign.

        Did I miss anything?

        Tammy in Utah
        Groomers Helper Affiliate

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        • #5
          A couple more things

          Originally posted by SpikeyTheYorkie View Post
          If the neighbor will PAY for your business cards and postcards to be re-printed, and you don't mind losing 200 sq. feet (are you sure that's not a big loss?), then why not?

          WAIT, one more thing: Will your phone number change? I'm sure you can move it with you. The address wont be a big deal, in my opinion, as you'll be very close by, people will see your sign.

          Did I miss anything?

          Tammy in Utah

          Yup, you forgot the cost of new turn on from the utility companies at the new location, and, the biggest things of all....

          If you change your address, you will have to tell your city and state licensing, and they will issue you new license numbers because you moved. You will have to pay for the new licenses, too. ALSO, if your business license numbers change, your bank won't just change it on your paperwork- they literally have to close your business account, and give you a new one.
          Doesn't this all sound like FUN?!

          Think long and hard, and yes, for the major pain in the *ss this will all be, he'd have to offer me a pretty big financial incentive!

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          • #6
            Is it any benefit to you?

            If not I wold explain nicely to your neighbor that being a new business you are hesitant to make the move, and make a nice long list of EVERYTHING that will have to be changed. Will they allow also for a sign on you old space that explains you moved, cause people will get confused...

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            • #7
              In addition to your out of pocket expenses incurred due to changing your address, don't forget about your lost income and possible lost customers during the build out phase of the move. Not sure how much construction you will need to do, but can you operate in your current space while the build out is going on? If not, you will risk losing customers during the down time.

              The benefits could be lower rent due to smaller space, and you can set up your shop in any way you want to on his dime (assuming he doesn't cap the build out cost or cap it too low). Now that you've been in business a few months, if there was anything you may have wanted to change in your existing space now you can incorporate the changes into your new space.

              I think there's a lot to consider before making a move. I'm also assuming your landlord has approved the move? Before you do anything you need to quantify your out of pocket expenses and possible lost income and make sure your neighbor is willing to cover everything at least 100% if not more as an incentive. And then get all details in writing before doing anything.

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              • #8
                I wonder too what his reasoning behind all this is. And, once you get the paperwork all settled, you still have to pack everything up, get it out the door, move it 15 ft, and unpack. Ugh, that sounds like a major pain in the bum.

                If you're going to do it, I'd write up a contract with the guy saying he'll cover all expenses, and any unforeseen ones as well...if you can do that. Plus a discounted rent since you're losing space, plus inconvenience fees. Remember that post cards and business cards that are already out will say something different than your new ones, so the move will have repercussions many months down the road.

                Keep us posted.
                Erin
                No Fur, No Paws, No Service.

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                • #9
                  After reading all of these posts, I've come to the conclusion that it would NOT be in your best interest. It sounds fishy, too. What's wrong with where he's at now? If you do decide to do it, hit him right in his wallet, so that it wont hit yours. Maybe have him hire movers, too!

                  Tammy in Utah
                  Groomers Helper Affiliate

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                  • #10
                    Why Not suggest HE MOVE????

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                    • #11
                      Yeah, after reading all of this I am with Tammy. That just seems to big a pain in the butt!
                      Scratch a dog and you'll find a permanent job. ~Franklin P. Jones

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                      • #12
                        Is it possible he wants to expand his business into your current space? If that's his motive, I'd suggest making a list, checking it twice, and asking him to sit down with you and an attorney and draw up a contract, stating what he's willing to be responsible for, financially.

                        Plan, plan, plan. Plan for everything that could go wrong. Remember Murphy's law? Well, Murphy was an optimist. After you make all your plans, run it past your attorney again.

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                        • #13
                          Yes, he is wanting to expand his business and has already signed a lease for the spot he wants me to move to. The landlord said we need to work it out then come to him.

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