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  • haircut/groom prices

    It seems to me that Standard Poodles, Doodles, OES, PWD, etc take twice as long as a standard breed haircut. By standard, I mean the more common dogs that you get like a bichon, mini poodle, schnauzer, or even Golden Retriever. So, it seems like the standard grooms cost, for instance $40, so the other category should be $80. It has never worked that way anywhere I've worked. I'm going to be opening a new shop in a couple of months, and while I don't want to scare away potential clients with too high prices, I also want to charge based on the realistic amount of time per dog from the start.

    Any ideas?

  • #2
    Think about how much money you want to make per HOUR and double it, that's how I do it. I get 50% of the groom so in my situation I figure out how much I will be getting, and then double it accordingly. In your situation you have overhead etc. so that is your other "50%" when you've doubled it.

    Hope that makse sense.

    Tammy in Utah
    Groomers Helper Affiliate

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    • #3
      Don't undercharge yourself and sell yourself short! You are right, it is crazy to charge nearly the same price for a Bishon and a Standard Poodle or a Schnauzer and a big Doodle. If some one complains about the price of the St Poo, I look them in the eye and say, "I can do 3 smaller grooms and make more money in the time it takes to do your Standard." Most people get that idea.
      SheilaB from SC

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      • #4
        prices

        I am going to start out at a first hour base price.
        That would be the minimum I would charge for any dog that I could
        do in one hour or less.( I am still pretty slow by some standards)
        As I gain speed and clients I can raise it.

        Based on how many customers I have, either the base rate or the
        following hours rate can rise.
        The following hours rates are anywhere from half the first hour, to
        the same as the first hour.
        You can tweek this, till its right for you and your area.
        I like it because I am not adding this and that for flea bath, nail trims,
        dematting, deshedding, etc.
        This way, the matted dogs that take so long, are charged more, and
        the easier dogs owners are charged less.
        You can always up your price on the base or the follow hours by five or ten
        dollars as you gain customers. Works for me.
        I just always note on the customers card, the two numbers I use for their
        rates.

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        • #5
          I dont think they should take twice as long unless maybe they are in bad condition. They do take longer... but double?

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          • #6
            Edited.
            Last edited by pamperedpups; 02-20-07, 12:32 AM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by starrynight View Post
              It seems to me that Standard Poodles, Doodles, OES, PWD, etc take twice as long as a standard breed haircut. By standard, I mean the more common dogs that you get like a bichon, mini poodle, schnauzer, or even Golden Retriever. So, it seems like the standard grooms cost, for instance $40, so the other category should be $80. It has never worked that way anywhere I've worked. I'm going to be opening a new shop in a couple of months, and while I don't want to scare away potential clients with too high prices, I also want to charge based on the realistic amount of time per dog from the start.

              Any ideas?
              Charge by the hour. Figure what your expenses for a month are going to be; rent, utilities, shapening, consumable products (shampoo, condtioner, bandanna materiel, etc), advertising, etc. Don't forget paying yourself when you figure that amount.

              Divide your total by the number of days you expect to work in a month. That's how much you have to make every day. Then divide by the number of hours you plan on working in a day. That's how much you need to charge for your hourly rate.

              Now, we do have a minimum charge; 1 hour for most dogs, 2 hours for standards, OES, other big hairy monsters. That's our base price. If it takes less than an hour, the customer still pays the base price. If it takes longer, we add in the additional time.

              And just fyi, my price for a standard is roughly triple what I charge for a toy. Big hairy dogs are 2/3 times what I charge for a golden. When you explain that the fees are based on the amount of time you spend working on the dog, no one seems to have a problem with it.

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              • #8
                I have to re-emphasize what Pamperedpups said above, as I price similarly. You've heard of "Double-wide" trailers, well, I'm sure you've also seen "double-wide goldens." You know, the golden retrievers that are at least twice as wide as they should be. Do you honestly think that golden that sits in the tub and you have to lift his fat rear end up to wash it should be the same price as your average sized golden that DOES stand in the tub?

                Don't do it to yourself, do NOT price according to breed only. NEVER ever undercharge, or you'll be sorry.

                I have a price list that pretty much has every breed you can imagine on it. BUT, that is only my BASE price for a regularly groomed dog, but it also says "Prices do NOT reflect matted, overweight, or Hard to Handle dogs. Prices do reflect regularly groomed (every 4-10 weeks) dogs."

                We usually don't even tell the owners prices over the phone, but we use it as a base to start with and then add more from there, if necessary.

                Good luck with this one!

                Tammy in Utah
                PS: I'd be happy to send you a copy of my price list, it has everything from Chihuahuas to Patterdale terriers on it. Then you can price according to your area.
                Groomers Helper Affiliate

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                • #9
                  Thanks for all of the suggestions! One thought I had was because all of the dogs will be new to me, is to quote a price range when I take the dog in that includes a max price that I would promise not to go over at that visit, but if I find that I've underquoted once I'm working on the dog, to tell the person that next time it will cost more.

                  For those of you who set your pricing based on what you need to make- do you find that your prices are reasonable and competitive in your area? I once worked at a place where the owner was the worst groomer I had ever seen (for instance, she woulnd't use shampoo on the dogs' heads because she was afraid to get soap in the eyes) but because her prices were so low she was always busy! People would complain, but keep coming back to her! I learned there just how powerful pricing can be... I still am flabergasted by how busy she was...

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                  • #10
                    Starrynight, did you have a lot of problem dogs, once a year dogs, etc. at this shop? That is what I find with the cheaper shops---they get the price shoppers, and they often have a higher rate of problem doggies, from my experience.

                    Tammy in Utah
                    Groomers Helper Affiliate

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                    • #11
                      I factor in the time, amount of work and the resources needed to groom large dogs. I usually set my prices at an hourly rate that reflects this. Time is money. I pay for my water and electric, so if it takes that much longer to wash, rinse, and dry something, I need to cover it. When I opened up shop I set prices by breed that I thought were fair, only to discover that I was actually $5 less per groom than the corporates, and $10+ per groom than most of the salons. I didn't want to underpay myself and started bringing the prices up with the new clients first. Now when people call to enquire and I give them a higher quote, they usually say, yeah, that seems to be the going rate, and will pay it. But you will always get some people who will haggle over prices no matter what your price is, so don't let that intimidate you into keeping it lower than it should be. When my prices were too low I still had hagglers, so there you go.

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                      • #12
                        [QUOTE=starrynight;20698]Thanks for all of the suggestions! One thought I had was because all of the dogs will be new to me, is to quote a price range when I take the dog in that includes a max price that I would promise not to go over at that visit, but if I find that I've underquoted once I'm working on the dog, to tell the person that next time it will cost more.

                        QUOTE]

                        There probably won't be a next time!
                        Most people know how much to expect to pay, when they try to nail you down to a price it usually means they are bargain shoppers, and they won't come back. Don't ever put a cost cap on your grooming. What if you are done with the dog and he craps all over and sits in it ?? You have to rewash and dry the dog...more time, more work =more money. It is always a mistake to undercharge!!

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                        • #13
                          I charge by the hour so there is never any question. I make money for every minute I put into grooming the dog, including clean up. I never feel rushed, but yet I do not deliberatly groom slower to make a buck. Don't cheapen yourself just to get customers in the door--you only get the ones you don't want to keep that way. Charge what you are worth and they will come eventually--and you will want to keep them

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                          • #14
                            My prices on Standards, OES, Bouviers, etc. are higher than anyone else in my area, but when talking to "phone shoppers" I am careful to re-iterate that these prices are for dogs groomed every 4-6 weeks that aren't matted. If their dog is matted or hasn't been groomed within that time period, I tell them that I cannot give an accurate price until I can evaluate their pet, and they can make an appt. and get a price when dropping off or they can bring their dog by and I can give them a price and then they can make an appt. It never seemed fair to me that someone can "save" by getting their dog groomed once or twice a year and only have to pay a smallish matted shave down fee. So, if they come in with a year's worth of matted, nasty, poopy hair, I charge accordingly. And most of those nasty matted dogs go to Petsomething!
                            (I feel sorry for the dogs, and I hate seeing it, but most of the time, they go home after being stripped and wait another 12-18 months to get groomed, and I prefer not to watch that cycle repeat itself if at all possible.)

                            EXCEPTION: Rescues are near and dear to my heart, and I do all I can, especially if I know for sure it's a rescue, and it's not just an excuse for the dog's condition, I'll do hard-knock-life-little-orphan-annie rescues for free!

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