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Shaving a neck to make a shock collar work better?

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  • Shaving a neck to make a shock collar work better?

    A women who as an 11 y/o springer who we usually do a 7strip on came in the other day and wanted my co-worker to shave just his neck with a 10 so the shock collar could be right on his skin. Am I the only one who thinks that's a cruel thing to do to an old dog. He probably barks cause he is getting a little senile. He sometime gets scared when I am washing and drying him and I have to talk with him a while to settle him down and I only dry him with the nozzle off and he does good.

  • #2
    I think its cruel to do to ANY dog. We had a dog come into the vets office that I used to work at, it was a lab and the people shaved its neck so the shock collar would work better!! A LAB!!! c'mon people. It had burn marks on its throat from the dumb thing. My aunt and uncle had a sheltie, and it barked all the time, they tried the shock collar and it had to be so tight, and in just the right place for it to work. The dog hated it and yelped everytime it shocked her. So they returned it. I understand why people get them, but there are so many other things to use to train dogs nowadays. And shaving it to make it work better?! That truly is cruel, JMO, though.

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    • #3
      Sadly both of these people were not using an electronic collar correctly. The electronic collar can be an outstanding training tool, WHEN used correctly. If fitted properly, used properly, and used in conjunction with training, the electronic collar obtains very steady and very reliable results. Wanting to shave the coat indicates improper fit or improper technique, as it simply is not needed, even on the very heavily coated breeds.

      ANY training tool can be used abusively, even a basic buckle collar and leash.

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      • #4
        Shock collars are a good tool if like everything else used properly. No, I would not use one on an 11 yr old dog. You would have to do some serious shocking constantly if even then to get a burn from them. Most likely what you saw was from the collar being too tight and the prongs digging into the skin. I have used shock collars for years with great success for hunting and field trial training. Chokers are just as cruel if not used properly. If a client insists on one form of training, I try to educate them on the proper used of it. A dog must understand why they are being shocked for it to work.
        If your dog is fat, you are not getting enough exercise!

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        • #5
          Don't they make them, knowing it has to go through fur? Shaving the fur in that area seems like it would be really cruel. That seems horrible, poor animal.

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          • #6
            My mother has a mini poodle that barked at EVERYTHING, you would be holding him and he would start barking at you (while rolling over to get his belly scratched). Every noise outside, cars going up another street he would bark at, the older he got the worse (he has a sister who doesn't bark at all).

            My mother bought a shock collar after the citronella spray collar had no effect (he varked harder after every spray, wagging his tail). he got shocked once...never yelped but no barking barked an hour later and then the shock. Silence.
            The next day the collar was put on (they took it off at night), and the door bell rang, shock.

            Now the collar hangs in the hallway on a hook, He has not worn it in about a year, if he gets going we ask if he wants his collar and silance.

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            • #7
              How cruel poor baby I do understand that they work if used properly but I can't imagine how it feels to the dog. I had shock treatment done on the nerves in my arm years ago and it hurt like h---
              "Whoever Said That Money Can't Buy Happiness Forgot About Puppies"
              Nancy

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              • #8
                I think they probably would be a good training tool....if used properly, but the problem is most people dont know how to, or the patience to do this. Maybe that is why they wanted to shave the dog. They wanted it to have a better reaction? It needs to be used in conjuction w/training, and sometimes when people get these tools they use them instead of training. It just doesnt work that way. It probably does depend on the dog too. I just probably wouldnt get one unless all other options were not working. Again though, they need to be used properly, and I dont think shaving the dog is using it properly.

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                • #9
                  I have to do this on dogs that wear collars for underground fences. All of them that I can recall were Pyrenees or Newfie’s and had extremely thick fur.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by plushpuppy View Post
                    How cruel poor baby I do understand that they work if used properly but I can't imagine how it feels to the dog. I had shock treatment done on the nerves in my arm years ago and it hurt like h---
                    I know what it feels like. I did it to myself before it went on my dog. On high, it hurts, but it is a quick correction. The only time I used it on high was to let my dog know that walking out to the street hurts or chasing deer. If it was a training (hunting ) correction it was not on high.
                    If your dog is fat, you are not getting enough exercise!

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                    • #11
                      I did this when I worked at Petsmart, it was for a huge pom, they brought the collar so I would know where to shave. Dog wouldn't shut up in the cage!!!

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                      • #12
                        The only reason I'd use a shock collar is for avoidence training (don't run into the road; leave that rattle snake alone) or remote training for field dogs, although people successfully trained hunting dogs for centuries before the shock collar was invented.

                        I don't think they should be in the hands of novices, and I don't think they should be used for barkers. It IS possible to teach a dog to be quiet, and it's not hard, nor does it take a long time. Ask any dog who comes in for grooming at my shop. Non-stop barking is not allowed, and most of them will figure it out in 10-15 minutes. The rest figure it out in half an hour.

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                        • #13
                          while not a fan of the collars, it does beat the alternative to having the dog run over or run away. most dogs don't go near the line, others test it continuously.
                          Certified Master Pet Tech Pet CPR, First Aid and Care Instructor
                          "Compassion will cure more sins than condemnation." Henry Ward Beecher US Congregational Minister 1813-1887

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                          • #14
                            Actually.......

                            Originally posted by keachy18 View Post
                            I think its cruel to do to ANY dog. We had a dog come into the vets office that I used to work at, it was a lab and the people shaved its neck so the shock collar would work better!! A LAB!!! c'mon people. It had burn marks on its throat from the dumb thing. My aunt and uncle had a sheltie, and it barked all the time, they tried the shock collar and it had to be so tight, and in just the right place for it to work. The dog hated it and yelped everytime it shocked her. So they returned it. I understand why people get them, but there are so many other things to use to train dogs nowadays. And shaving it to make it work better?! That truly is cruel, JMO, though.

                            It's only cruel if you abuse it, like anything else, which means not only using it incorrectly intentionally, but also through ignorance. Wanna know what one of the most dangerous pieces of equipment to use on a dog is? A plain old buckle collar and leash. Yup, that's right. When you, or the dog, pulls on it, all of the pressure is concentrated in one spot- the trachea. A slip collar at least diffuses the pressure from one spot only, and a prong collar is even better. They may look cruel, but a prong collar spreads the pressure evenly around the entire neck, in tiny spots. If a dog has a problem with a collapsing trachea, these are their best bet for a collar.

                            As far as electronic collars go, it is impossible for them to "burn" the skin. There is not enough juice in ANY of them to cause that kind of damage. What people are usually seeing is damage to the skin from the collar being worn continuously, the skin never getting a break. I've got an electronic bark collar for my one non-stop barker (happens when I'm not home), which keeps
                            both of us from getting into trouble with the neighbors. I've got three remote collars, which allows me to take all three of my dogs out to the middle of nowhere for a long run off-leash. All three are hunting breeds, and I wouldn't completely trust them off-leash to not take off if they found something to chase.

                            My dogs actually get excited when I pick up the remote collars, jostling each other around to be the first one collared up. They know it means they're going somewhere, and it gives them freedom they would never have without them. When people tell me it's cruel to put them on my dogs, I just laugh- my dogs would disagree. ;-)

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                            • #15
                              Used properly, shock collars can be an effective training tool. However, I question whether this old dog is in need of one at 11 yrs. old. He may be senile and deaf, so I doubt the dog will learn anything from it. Sounds cruel considering the circumstances.

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