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What's the longest time most like to spend dematting

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  • What's the longest time most like to spend dematting

    I had a Bichon today a month overdue for what should have been it's scheduled grooming for a puppy cut who wasn't too bad on the trunk or legs but had severe matting around the neck, head , shoulders, rear, tummy and behind the ears and even with shampoo, conditioner and ruff out it took 25 minutes to dematt these areas while stretch drying. The poor thing turned a little bright pink behind the ears and a little on her tummy. Do most just go for a shorter shave down especially when they have such sensitive skin? It seems like a lot of Bichon's skin is easily irritatated when you need to brush or comb one area too much. I didn't take the dog in so had no say over the haircut, my boss told them we could do a pupy cut. I personally would've tried a #3 and went from there. They do some brushing at home but obviously it wasn't enough. I guess I'm just not a big an of dematt especially on the white dogs who seem to get irritatated so much faster.

  • #2
    i dont dematt,start over,but i leave it as long as i can,i will dematt small areas,or areas that come out easily

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    • #3
      I use a spray on product that I use. Leave it on the mat for a few minutes and it comes apart with ease. Sometimes severe matting around the neck can be reduced some if they are not brushing at home by using a rolled collar instead of a flat one.

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      • #4
        Edited.
        Last edited by pamperedpups; 02-25-07, 03:35 PM.

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        • #5
          I will do up to 20 minutes of de-matting, but it really depends on the dog---I wouldn't do 20 minutes on "any" dog, I can say that.

          For example, I've got the most beautiful shih tzu you've ever seen that comes into my shop. Her coat is so white, with a little brown on the saddle area, black nose, but mostly white dog. Oh my gosh she's cute. And she always had long hair, almost full-coated, but she's a puppy so it was still growing.

          So I demat her and she does well. This last time, however, the owners and I both knew it was time to shave Lucy down. I felt so bad, but there was NO way I was going to put that dog through such serious de-matting. Got a #4 through it, and it came out cute. I de-matted her before Christmas and she did very well, and she went home with beautiful long hair, no damage to her psyche, and my hands were ok too. But this is something that I wont make a habit of.

          Also, if it's around the neck, particularly the throat, this is dangerous to de-mat, as you could slice the throat right open if you're not careful. When those throat mats are close to the skin, I tell them "It's gotta go." They understand when I show them my de-matting tools!

          Tammy in Utah
          Groomers Helper Affiliate

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          • #6
            I will shave out the bad spots,behind the ears sometimes the whole tummy armpits etc. Then bath and hv most times it gets enough of the mats to leave lenght and the shaved spts hardly show.

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            • #7
              I don't think matts are my problems, they are the owners' problems.

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              • #8
                I won't do that kind of dematting. I'll only do small mats in isolated areas. I don't demat armpits, tummies, inside the legs or behind ears.

                If the dog has multiple areas of matting, like you described, I wet shave the matted areas. Then I dry the entire dog and blend everything in.

                I've also found that it's possible to clip through the mats, rather than under them, when you wet shave. Once you do that, you can usually brush them out easily.

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                • #9
                  I was taught that washing a Bichon coat with mats will make the mats worse? Is this wrong? Don't know, becuase honestly I've never tried it any other way. If I get a Bichon in that's really matted, it gets a wet shave. If it's just minor mats/tangles I spritz and detangle before the bath. I don't like to demat longer than 15 min. And it does depend on the dog like others stated. And also it depends where the mats are. Excessive neck mats I probably wouldn't demat, especially on a Bichon. There never seems to be a simple solution for mats - except buzzing them.

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                  • #10
                    The most time I LIKE to spend de-matting??? ZERO! I hate it, and will only do it if the dog doesn't seem to mind. But then only about 15min worth. I find I can get most out by using The Stuff and Chris Christiansen's Ice On Ice. I spray it on the matted area, then pull apart with my fingers, and may even break it up further with the de-mat comb. I do this after HV drying while I'm finish drying with a stand dryer.
                    Old groomers never die, they just go at a slower clip.

                    Groom on!!!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by milhasavilla View Post
                      I was taught that washing a Bichon coat with mats will make the mats worse? Is this wrong? Don't know, becuase honestly I've never tried it any other way. If I get a Bichon in that's really matted, it gets a wet shave. If it's just minor mats/tangles I spritz and detangle before the bath. I don't like to demat longer than 15 min. And it does depend on the dog like others stated. And also it depends where the mats are. Excessive neck mats I probably wouldn't demat, especially on a Bichon. There never seems to be a simple solution for mats - except buzzing them.
                      Washing doesn't make matting worse on any breed. It's the drying without brushing that makes mats worse. Water+heat+friction=felt.

                      Mats will brush out more easily if they're wet, and hopefull clean. Soak them with leave in conditioner, and they're even easier to brush out.

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                      • #12
                        Milhasa- I don't use my tools on dirty dogs and actually find it easier to brush out areas after a good shampooing (and conditioning rinse on breeds and mixes that need it). Bathing CAN make matts worse IF you don't do anything with them afterwards, but as your intentions are to groom the dogs you don't have to worry about that!

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                        • #13
                          I work at a very high end grooming salon in Marin county california, with very particular clients, and per my boss, I will pretty much dematt anything, if the owner will pay the incredibly expensive dematting fee. But, despite my initial reservations about doing this, I have learned how to do some pretty extensive dematting with little discomfort to the animal. Not trying to offend anyone here, but I feel that a lot of groomers are way to quick to shave. As long as the owner understands the risks involved, and knows what the price will be, I think at least half an hour is reasonable. I have done horrible dematts for 2 1/2 hours or more, with only minor irritation resulting. One of my former hideous dematting projects now comes every 2 weeks, and is the opposite of traumatized, he is absolutely in love with me! I think dematting, and its risks, have a lot to do with groomer experience, not the process itself. There are cases where I'll say "forget it!" but most of the time, the cost would be so high that the customer choses the shave down before I have to. Thats my little bit on that...

                          Sherry

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by pamperedpups View Post
                            In my opinion, dematting is no good for the critter, no good for the coat and no good for you. No dog that comes in to my shop has to stand for dematting over 10 minutes. If the coat is more than a bit snarled, it will be shaved. I make no promises like, "I'll try to leave the coat as long as I can," as with that information most pet owners tend to picture a coat left much longer than possible. Instead, I inform my clients that clippers cannot clip THROUGH matts so I must clip UNDER them, which may leave their pet's coat very short. That way there are no surprises!
                            Couldn't have said it better myself!! I agree 100% -- I wish all groomers felt this way. After all, it's the right thing to do...

                            Rose

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                            • #15
                              Edited.
                              Last edited by pamperedpups; 02-25-07, 03:30 PM.

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