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Why do some not want to learn to be a better groomer.

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  • Why do some not want to learn to be a better groomer.

    Average is fine for some groomers. How can you stimulate them to want to learn more?

  • #2
    I don't think you can unless they are passionate about this career. Paying their way to a trade show might help, or a financial incentive for learning new techniques. There a lot of just mediocre groomers out there.
    Old groomers never die, they just go at a slower clip.

    Groom on!!!

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    • #3
      Honestly, I'm OK with being just average. I have never enjoyed doing the "froufrou" grooms. I have always focused more on the comfort and handling of the dog and giving my clients easy maintained trims. Maybe because I've always been a rural groomer for the most part. I'll never win a competition and I'm OK with that.

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      • #4
        Lot of it is pure laziness. They are comfortable with their paycheck. We all want to be better at what we do but this is one profession where being an exceptional groomer and being an average groomer really doesn’t translate into more money. I employed very average even below average groomers but they are like able and outgoing they had many clients who were loyal to them. And on the other side I once had a talented comp level groomer who was a B. Was rude and nasty to clients. She had very few clients and was mad that no one kept their pets in fancy clips. Left after a few months.

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        • #5
          Are these employees you are referring to? Surely you can set minimum standards for your workplace. Encourage, reward continued education. I know there are employers on here who have made streaming services available during lunch breaks, and have talked to quite a few grooming expo attendees whose employers paid for their classes.

          However, if you are referring to coworkers, or just other groomers in general, well we just aren’t all the same. Some people are driven to push push push to get better, be the best, and that’s great. They can turn out impeccable grooms and textbook correct terrier patterns in their sleep. That self motivation is awesome and awe inspiring and can take them far. We need people like that.

          But I don’t consider myself lazy just because I am not that way. I’m gonna need to pull out my Notes book to check the terrier pattern. More of a jack of all trades, master of none, this is not an all-consuming passion for me, just one of many. It is how I earn money, which enables me to pursue some of my other interests. When I first started, sure I pushed and worked hard to acquire knowledge and skill. Over the years I have learned that my clientele here wants to see their pets’ eyes, not have too much messy hair around their mouth, a clean hiner, and the nails trimmed. So while there is always room for improvement and polish, my clients are happy, and most of the time, I am too.

          There are more paths than one and room for all levels of skill and motivation.


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          • #6
            Depends what is meant by better.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by IrishSetterTom View Post
              We all want to be better at what we do but this is one profession where being an exceptional groomer and being an average groomer really doesn’t translate into more money.
              This is somewhat the problem. I don't think the average pet owner wants to pay for the extra time it takes. It rare that I have had clients that wanted exceptional grooms. Over my 30 years, 95% of my clients want short all over grooms because they just don't want to deal with the hair, brushing at home, or the cost. There have been exceptions of course, but like I said above, I have mostly been a rural area groomer so this have been my experience., I'm sure city folks are more likely to want higher quality grooms. We all have our own base with different needs and wants. I think as long as we are making our clients happy and treating the dogs well, we all win. If you want your groomers to step it up, give them the incentive to do so. However, there is nothing wrong with being average if that is what your clients want. If they want above average, make them pay for it. Time is money!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by poodlefeet View Post

                Some people are driven to push push push to get better, be the best, and that’s great. They can turn out impeccable grooms and textbook correct terrier patterns in their sleep. That self motivation is awesome and awe inspiring and can take them far. We need people like that.

                But I don’t consider myself lazy just because I am not that way. I’m gonna need to pull out my Notes book to check the terrier pattern. More of a jack of all trades, master of none, this is not an all-consuming passion for me, just one of many. It is how I earn money, which enables me to pursue some of my other interests. When I first started, sure I pushed and worked hard to acquire knowledge and skill. Over the years I have learned that my clientele here wants to see their pets’ eyes, not have too much messy hair around their mouth, a clean hiner, and the nails trimmed. So while there is always room for improvement and polish, my clients are happy, and most of the time, I am too.

                There are more paths than one and room for all levels of skill and motivation.

                THIS^^^^

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Emma123 View Post
                  Depends what is meant by better.
                  Right? are they sending home sloppy grooms or are they just not textbook quality grooms?

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                  • #10
                    Some people just don't have "the eye" for the fine tuning. They CAN'T get better. No matter how hard they try.
                    <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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                    • #11
                      I have been on both sides of the spectrum. I showed dogs for years. There’s no comparison to your average house pet. 99 percent of house pets have poor confirmation. You could have the best groomer in the world. If the dog has poor coat and confirmation why waste their time and pay way more. Getting better army grooming doesn’t always mean better looking grooms, it may mean better safety, more efficient grooming.

                      Just because you are a certified master doesn’t mean you have the hand skills. You may have a vast wealth of knowledge. But if you can’t translate that into scissor skills, it doesn’t matter.

                      We all have our strengths. Just like doctors who specialize, we do also. You cannot be a master at all breeds. You don’t even see a majority of breeds in a grooming shop. It’s all mixed breeds and doodles which have no standard.

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                      • #12
                        After grooming for 35 years, and attending grooming school in 1987, and have gone to almost every Pet Quest and Groom Expo for the past 35 years, I still consider myself an average groomer. Like so many have said before me, my clients wants an easy maintenance groom that will last 4-6-8 weeks. I do feel that I'm above a lot of groomers when it comes to customer service. I've known my clients for 8-10-12 years so we always chit-chat about weather, and the current problems of the world. I got to know the kids and have asked a little guy if I could be his girlfriend.. he gushes and says NOOOOO..........I've found out the one of my clients, who is in her 80's, is the granddaughter of Horatio who Ken Burns did a special on PBS ( in 1903 he was the first guy to have driven a car from the west coast to the east coast). So grooming is probably average, but customer service is what I specialize in when it comes to my clients.

                        Happy watching Horatio's Drive by Ken Burns


                        Dolly's Barking Bubbles, LLC

                        www.dollysbarkingbubbles.com

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                        • #13
                          I consider myself a good pet groomer. I don’t have the desire to compete, even though early on I thought that was the way to being successful. In 12 years I’ve had one person ask about my training and continuing Ed. Most everyone else looks at the quality of the work I put out and makes referrals based on that. Not everyone has always been happy, so they’ve found someone that better meets their aesthetic.

                          NOW, going to seminars, reading online, continuing to improve my technique is a personal growth issue.
                          It use to be frustrating working next to someone who hadn’t revised her styling in 20 years. I respect her skills in many areas where I’m not as proficient or even comfortable.
                          We’ve gotten to a point where we can ask for help in our areas of weakness, critique each other’s work and offer tweaks, etc.
                          BUT as others have stated, most clients want clean, easy ,maintenance, and happy dogs at the end of the day.

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                          • #14
                            That was my question too? I’ve known groomers that refuse to get the mats out between toes, or behind ears, or completely comb the dog out. That doesn’t fly with me.
                            If they want to groom like that, then do it somewhere else…not at my shop.

                            So…what more do you want them to learn?
                            Do you want them to do show grooming, handstripping, coloring, creative? If so, that’s great. Then the client is charged a bunch more for that work, and the groomer is paid a bunch more for that work.

                            Do you have clients that want that type of grooming? I don’t. They don’t want to keep it up, and they don’t want to pay me what I want to do that type of work. For instance, I did some handstripping for awhile. I could never get anyone to come in often enough to roll the coat. It was always a totally tear down on a totally blown coat. Not very rewarding for me so I stopped offering that.

                            Also, I’m very good at basic trims…I would never be as good as the people you see at grooming competitions. Wow! Are they Good!
                            I don’t have that ability. And, again, I don’t have clients that want to upkeep and pay for that type of work.

                            I think Washing made a good point. I’m grooming in Small Town America, not in the Big City where dogs are on display more often. I think that makes a difference.

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                            • #15
                              I have known groomers that are truly turned off by grooming or learning anything more than what let's them get by and get the paycheck, and those bored by grooming. Then there are the bathers who are a different breed. I have offered training to some who say NO, no interest. Now their reasons usually are they don't have confidence to do finish work and no intent to change that and get over that hump.

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