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  • Skin cuts during shaving

    I stopped doing lion cuts for all but one client, but I realized something about cat skin. As thin as it is, and easy to tear, it also heals on its own so well -- apart from deep wounds or bites that can get infected.
    I remember visiting a client who tried to cut out a mat. The cat had a large scab, 1 inch long.The owner hadn't noticed it. The cat was acting normal.
    I have seen other cat cuts heal on their own. It makes sense. If cats needed our help to recover from nicks and small cuts, they wouldn't last long outside. So, yes, I do all I can to avoid nicking the skin of course, but I no longer consider it a health risk for the cat.
    What has been your experience with this?

  • #2
    Well we used to have a saying when I worked as a vet tech. Put a cat and it's bones in the same room and it will heal. They do seem to have uncanny ability to heal quickly and well.

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    • #3
      Ha! That is true!

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      • #4
        I have noticed they heal well (there's studies that prove the frequency of a cat's purring promotes healing and bone growth!)
        what's frustrating to me is when the vet tech pokes and prods at the cut and suddenly the little quarter inch nick is massive and needs multiple stitches

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        • #5
          Originally posted by tabbykitten13 View Post
          I have noticed they heal well (there's studies that prove the frequency of a cat's purring promotes healing and bone growth!)
          what's frustrating to me is when the vet tech pokes and prods at the cut and suddenly the little quarter inch nick is massive and needs multiple stitches

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          • #6
            Good point!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by tabbykitten13 View Post
              I have noticed they heal well (there's studies that prove the frequency of a cat's purring promotes healing and bone growth!)
              what's frustrating to me is when the vet tech pokes and prods at the cut and suddenly the little quarter inch nick is massive and needs multiple stitches
              Makes sense very cool.

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              • #8
                In fact, might be good that owners don't noticd when they cut the skin. If they noticed, they'd be poking and might make the tear worse.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by tabbykitten13 View Post
                  I have noticed they heal well (there's studies that prove the frequency of a cat's purring promotes healing and bone growth!)
                  what's frustrating to me is when the vet tech pokes and prods at the cut and suddenly the little quarter inch nick is massive and needs multiple stitches
                  Really? I haven't worked that much with cats and cuts. Making cuts worse, OMG.

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                  • #10
                    I never had issues with my cats that got scratched or cut running into brambles and such. Blade cuts are different it seems. But I agree poking can make much worse. It all depends on Where they get cut too.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by cybercat View Post
                      I never had issues with my cats that got scratched or cut running into brambles and such. Blade cuts are different it seems. But I agree poking can make much worse. It all depends on Where they get cut too.
                      Yes I learned right from the start with Verplank that no matter cats or dogs, the ANGLE you hold the clipper determines if you are going to poke and how close the blade works ultimately.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by cockerlvr View Post
                        Well we used to have a saying when I worked as a vet tech. Put a cat and it's bones in the same room and it will heal. They do seem to have uncanny ability to heal quickly and well.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Cats use frequency tones. https://www.goodnet.org/articles/5-a...ng-powers-list

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Emma123 View Post
                            I stopped doing lion cuts for all but one client, but I realized something about cat skin. As thin as it is, and easy to tear, it also heals on its own so well -- apart from deep wounds or bites that can get infected.
                            I remember visiting a client who tried to cut out a mat. The cat had a large scab, 1 inch long.The owner hadn't noticed it. The cat was acting normal.
                            I have seen other cat cuts heal on their own. It makes sense. If cats needed our help to recover from nicks and small cuts, they wouldn't last long outside. So, yes, I do all I can to avoid nicking the skin of course, but I no longer consider it a health risk for the cat.
                            What has been your experience with this?
                            Actually in another sense, I never thought the Lion Cut which is fun, but never made a cat look their best.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by cockerlvr View Post
                              Well we used to have a saying when I worked as a vet tech. Put a cat and it's bones in the same room and it will heal. They do seem to have uncanny ability to heal quickly and well.
                              Indeed they do.

                              Comment

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