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  • I'm scared of changing jobs. help?

    I'm scared of changing jobs. My groomer called today and offered me a job to help her out (probably bathing and learning grooming when she has a chance). I am currently working at a large retail pet store, which I LOVE the animals.... and this saturday I start working at the zoo (as a ticket taker at the entrance...no animals ).... and there aren't enough hours in the day to work everywhere....
    I'm just afraid of making the wrong decision....

    I think I want to work at the groomer's and the zoo.... they are close to home.... and every thing pays about the same! and no one is offering benefits...
    I'm just scared I'm going to try grooming and I'm going to be terrible or something. I'm not good at making big decisions.

    any words of wisdom?

  • #2
    Job change?

    Well...my first thought with the groomer position is "will she be able to keep me employed if she goes through a rough patch, for whatever reason?" This may not be a valid concern if it's a big shop and lots of groomers for you to help out. If it's a one gal show and you are her bather/protoge, what happens if she needs to move or gets disabled (Heaven forbid!) or something? Just something you'll want to think about.

    You are currently working at (what I assume is) a very stable job at a large retail pet shop. The zoo (unless it's small and privately owned) will probably be a "safe" bet for long term employment too, but will be less personal than working with dogs and their people.

    I worked for a groomer in the summers as a teen and it was very seasonal. You know, the big seasons of Christmas and the summer shave-downs, so I would never have wanted to bet on that income to raise a family, but it was fantastic experience for me then.

    You might ask the groomer about her long term intentions. Perhaps you can be "groomed" (pun intended) for taking over if she is close to retirement.

    Good luck on whatever you decide.

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    • #3
      yes i also would ask the groomer what her intentions are. will she be able to provide you with training in an appropriate amount of time? ie agree on a time frame that both of you feel you should be comfortable being trained in (ie 6 to 8 months...provided she shows you stuff and lets you work on the dogs at least 2 to 3 times a week...also how many days are you going to be working? how long has her business been established? can she honestly be able to afford to pay you your half of the grooms when you are grooming? etc etc...
      if shes a new business...i wouldnt chance it...if she has been established for quite awhile and can be able to provide for you then maybe take a chance on it...also id check and see how many groomers she has avalible...they might be able to provide some insight on what her expectations are etc.
      JMO
      Hound

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      • #4
        Find out what "Probably" means (per your words). Probably learn grooming would not be sufficient enough for me.

        What is your financial situation? Can you handle a roller coaster paycheck... sometimes high and sometimes low? As a groomer until you get a steady flow of clients the work is up and down:-) But, once you get in it... you will love it:-)

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        • #5
          I decided on the groomer and zoo.
          I talked to my groomer yesterday... she is going to hire me to help out with the additonal work load. (a local groomer closed shop and referred everyone to my groomer). on top of that work load, she (my groomer) sprained her wrist, so I'm going to be a bather AND learn grooming.

          I'm very excited!

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          • #6
            Good for you! If she's a good teacher and you're willing to learn all you can, I think it would be a great opportunity for you. You might also want to pick up a copy of "Notes from the Grooming Table" by Melissa Verplank. Good reading at night while you're not at the shop.

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            • #7
              Hard Starting Out

              I've only been grooming 3 years and I still have doubts. Have you made a pro vs. con list? That may help you decide. I work at a small grooming shop and don't have benefits. In big retail shops you can usually get insurance and paid vacations. I would consider what you would gain from leaving where you currently are. The decision you make has to make you happy.

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              • #8
                Just wanted to give everyone an update:
                This is week two at the groomer - and it's GREAT! It's a small shop (I make 3!) I bathe the dogs (well the "good" dogs)....And I'm learning. this week I'm going to learn to clean ears and cut nails. At this point, I think I'm happy just washing and drying the dogs. One of the great things about the shop, they teach me (and correct me) with out making me feel stupid or anything. I'm a fast learner, but it's taken me a bit to get comfortable with how much shampoo to use. It's finally sinking in that "it's better to have too much shampoo than not enough."

                So now, I work there 3 days and 3 at the zoo... It's supposed to be 4 at the zoo, but they haven't scheduled me for the 4th day... hmmm...

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                • #9
                  hey good for you! yep...better to have too much shampoo than not enough...it all rinses out the same LOL! this way you dont have the dog all rinsed out and it's still dirty or smelly...this way you only rinse once, scrub a dub dub very well, and rinse and dry! badaboom doggys done! cool that your already going to learn nails and ears! are they going to show you how to shave the pawpads too?
                  and look at it this way...your already working 6 days a week id take that extra day off and relax!
                  Hound

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