Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tick Problem

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Tick Problem

    I realized after grooming 2 dogs (same owner) both in pretty bad shape that they had ticks. I prefer to not groom dogs with ticks. I called the owner ( I have them leave a number where I am able to reach them quickly) and she has not called back. So I have the dogs in a separate area than where I keep other pets. Do you other groomers out there except pets with ticks. I would prefer her go get frontline then I could finish the grooming 2 days from today. What do you think? Any suggestions appreciated .

  • #2
    How many ticks are you talking about? I have no problem with 5 or 6 ticks or even a few more. I once did a dog that had to have 30 or 40. Yuk!!!! I haven't ever turned one away though. If someone were to call and ask I would recommend applying Frontline and come in a couple days later but probably wouldn't refuse one unless there were an excessive number of ticks (like dozens).

    Comment


    • #3
      If I find parasites on any dogs that come into my shop, they are treated for them, and the owner charged accordingly, whether they are aware of the problem or not. I use a flea and tick shampoo, then offer a spot-on treatment. I call the owner just as soon as I discover the problem, so they have the chance to treat their yards and house before picking the dog/s up. Then I fog the shop overnight.

      Comment


      • #4
        I do groom dogs with ticks. It isn't a big deal to me at all. I have more of a problem with fleas. But I groom them too. I would do a flea & tick bath and just remove them with hemostats. To me, it's just part of the job.

        Comment


        • #5
          I once groomed a springer with a good 100-200 ticks! I kid you not! The owners ended up leaving him there after he was boarded for a month or so we called and they said they don't want him anymore. After another month or so they came and got him because they had to pay the bill anyways. I hate to think that the poor guy either ended up in the shelter being PTS or in the back yard collecting more ticks. The springer was very sweet and well behaved, I came so close to taking him but I had just moved and I'm not supposed to have more than two animals.

          Comment


          • #6
            I would remove them immediately just to make the dog feel better. If there are more than a couple of ticks I charge for removal. I also save them in a cup to show the owner. I don't think I would ever turn a dog away because of ticks. Be sure to check their gums when you find ticks. They can become enemic. 2 days can put a wear on the dog with ticks.
            If your dog is fat, you are not getting enough exercise!

            Comment


            • #7
              Nasty old ticks...

              I'm not sure what part of the country you are in...but the ticks here in NJ are an all year problem along with fleas. Its just the perfect environment for them, never gets cold enough to kill them off. I was diagnosed with Lymes Disease just over a month ago for the second time in my life. I do not recall getting bit by a tick this time. But I have the disease again now and am suffering from the affects now. I'm not sure about this, but I think you can get tick born illnesses from removing ticks from dogs/cats themselves without having the tick actually attach themselves to their host. If I see more ticks again on a dog...I will tell them to take the dog to a vet, just because I know what Lymes disease can do to a human...and its a very bad disease for the dog/cat to get too. From now on I will be extremely hesistant to take a dog with ticks. My experience with Tick Arrest collars from Francodex has be great. Within a couple of days of the collar being on a dog, the ticks die and detach themselves from the host animal. It paralyzes them so they cannot feed and them will eventually fall off or die on the animal.

              Comment


              • #8
                you can't get Lyme disease unless you are bitten by an affected tick.
                If your dog is fat, you are not getting enough exercise!

                Comment


                • #9
                  I always just remove them. I've removed as many as 500 ticks from one dog a couple of times...and charged for the time it took, too. I prefer to get them off the dog ASAP, rather than apply any sort of insecticide because the longer the ticks feed, the greater the chances of the dog suffering from serious anemia, and the greater the chances of the dog suffering a tick bourne illness.

                  As long as you don't touch the ticks you aren't in any danger of catching any tick bourne illnesses. I use hemos and a container of alcohol to put them in once I remove them. I never touch them with my bare hands.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    What's the easiest way to remove ticks? I had read on here to rub their rear ends with alcohol and they will release their hold---and I've been told not to rip their butts off or the head will stay in, lol. I've not seen ONE tick since I've been grooming in 3 years except 1 dog that came through here while on vacation from Florida, and it was groomed by someone else. I've seen 5 fleas in 3 years with the exception of the VERY FIRST dog I ever groomed on my own---she was infested. I feel fortunate not to have to deal with many parasites, etc...but because of this I don't know what to do about the ticks.

                    Tammy in Utah
                    Groomers Helper Affiliate

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Not to many ticks in Utah!

                      They are rampent in South Jersey.

                      There was a time when the state of NJ required all Pet Grooming Salons to have a licensed "Certified Pest Control Operator" to be in charge of all the employees who had to be licensed "Certified Pesticide Applicators".

                      You have to pass the same "Core" examination that an exterminator did.
                      The "Category test was for "PetGroomer" but I also took my "General Pest Control" category and was licensed to not ony apply pesticides on pet's but also to apply pesticides on Homes and Yards.

                      I made a business out of it. If I treated your home, yard and pet and they got fleas or ticks again their bath (flea bath) was "No Charge".

                      I helped develop some of the regs in the state, developed and promoted a product manufactured by US Borax called "Disodium Octoborate tetrahydrate" a pure water soluable boron for the carpets.

                      I really was into it until I got lung cancer in 1994. Not to worry the cancer was not from the pesticides. We still treat for fleas and ticks however I have stopped doing home and yard pest control jobs because I do not have the lung power, to strenuous.

                      I think that if an owner brings us a pet who is infested that this is what we do and should use the least toxic remedies available to treat (kill) those fleas and ticks immediately. "Right Into The Tub" no kennel time.

                      Just remember you cannot use a "de-limonene" product after a pet has been bathed in a "Natural Pyrethrin" shampoo. The synergist in the pyrethrin shampoo can cause a de-limonene toxicity.

                      Any shampoo will eventually kill fleas it destroys the waxy coating that keeps their insides in. They just will not die quickly. That is where a pesticide comes in. It give you your quick kill so you are not picking the fleas out of your hair.

                      We require every dog and cat to have a Flea and Tick shampoo whether or not they have fleas or ticks. We do not want any customers pets to infect any others. There is a charge for that also. We do not fog. We spray on a regular basis, monthly. Washing also kills fleas on towels and bedding.

                      I forgot more then most knew about "Pesticides" so if any of you need a way to go do not hesitate to PM or call me at 1-866-987-2426 if I may be of help.

                      Chuck

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        A few ticks, no problem, I'll remove them. If the dog was covered with hundreds, no thank you.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by SpikeyTheYorkie View Post
                          What's the easiest way to remove ticks? I had read on here to rub their rear ends with alcohol and they will release their hold---and I've been told not to rip their butts off or the head will stay in, lol. I've not seen ONE tick since I've been grooming in 3 years except 1 dog that came through here while on vacation from Florida, and it was groomed by someone else. I've seen 5 fleas in 3 years with the exception of the VERY FIRST dog I ever groomed on my own---she was infested. I feel fortunate not to have to deal with many parasites, etc...but because of this I don't know what to do about the ticks.

                          Tammy in Utah
                          I have a tick popper. It looks like a spoon with a little v in it to get under the tick and pop it off at the head. You don't want to squeeze them or grab them by the butt.
                          If your dog is fat, you are not getting enough exercise!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Ticked Off!

                            I have that same spoon thing with the V in it. It's called Ticked Off. I got mine from PetEdge. Then I don't have to worry about touching them or squeezing the blood back in the dog. It just pops them right out and then they go right into a container with rubbing alcohol. I think in the last two years of business I've only removed about 10 ticks. At school they would just use hemostats and it scared me that the head would be left in or that the blood was being squeezed back into the dog. Now I feel safer using "Ticked Off"!!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Ugh..,when I first became a groomer, i was terrified of removing ticks. It really discusted me. Luckily I worked with some wonderful people, who, when I yelled "tick!" would come and take care of the problem. It took me over a year to do it. Its been the most difficult thing for me to overcome in grooming. I use the "tick off" for engorged ticks. I also purchased a new tweezer type (I can't remember the name of it), but it has a magnifying glass and you can get off the tiniest of ticks with it. I've pulled off almost 100 ticks off a dog before, and I didn't get paid for it (I worked for someone else). Now I would definitely charge.
                              i
                              don't find yourself up a creek without a poodle.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X