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Long Term Protective Immunity in Dogs

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  • Long Term Protective Immunity in Dogs

    A very good article packed full of data:

    http://dogsnaturallymagazine.com/blo...dogs-and-cats/

  • #2
    It's interesting, but it was written in 2009, before we started seeing outbreaks of distemper an parvo in adult dogs who were vaccinated according the the suggested protocol for vaccinating puppies, including the one year booster. Perhpas time and nature will answer the question of how long immunity is lasting.

    I used to be a supporter of extended immunity and didn't vaccinate yearly. But the reports we've seen in the last few months are causing me to reconsider that opinion. For me the jury is still out. I need to see more data on the outbreaks that are cropping up across the country.

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    • #3
      Excellent. Thank you for posting.
      "The gift which I am sending you is called a dog, and is in fact the most precious and valuable possession of mankind"-Theodorus Gaza

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Helly View Post
        It's interesting, but it was written in 2009, before we started seeing outbreaks of distemper an parvo in adult dogs who were vaccinated according the the suggested protocol for vaccinating puppies, including the one year booster. Perhpas time and nature will answer the question of how long immunity is lasting.

        I used to be a supporter of extended immunity and didn't vaccinate yearly. But the reports we've seen in the last few months are causing me to reconsider that opinion. For me the jury is still out. I need to see more data on the outbreaks that are cropping up across the country.
        I think titers should be done, that way if your dog needs it you know, and if it doesn't then you know. I don't get my dogs vaccs after their cycle and 1 year booster, except for rabies, because when i mailed a letter to my town about whether they excepted titers in place of rabies certificates, they responded with they weren't sure.

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        • #5
          Helly I am sure many of us would be interested in seeing the research studies you have been reading. Any links you can direct us to? Everything I have seen so far leans to the idea that vaccination immunity against common viruses is long term rather than short term in both humans and canines. I'm always interested in conflicting information, I imagine most of us are.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by SwissNChow View Post
            Helly I am sure many of us would be interested in seeing the research studies you have been reading. Any links you can direct us to? Everything I have seen so far leans to the idea that vaccination immunity against common viruses is long term rather than short term in both humans and canines. I'm always interested in conflicting information, I imagine most of us are.

            What I'm referring to are not studies, but reports that are coming in from around the country in veterinary publications and verbal discussions I'm hearing between the doctors at work.

            Even in humans, though, we were all told when we got our vaccinations as kids that the immunity would be lifelong. Now they're telling us it's probably not so. I know I was vaccinated against whooping cough, among other things. But it didn't prevent me from getting whooping cough as an adult. It wasn't much fun, either.

            And, if you remember the events after 9/11, when anthrax was sent through the mail, there was much discussion on the potential for someone using small pox in the same way, and those of us who had been vaccinated as kids would probably need boosters if that happened.

            Sometimes the problem with conflicting information is the simple fact that most of it is anectdotal, and there's no real proof on either side.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by pinkgroomer View Post
              I think titers should be done, that way if your dog needs it you know, and if it doesn't then you know. I don't get my dogs vaccs after their cycle and 1 year booster, except for rabies, because when i mailed a letter to my town about whether they excepted titers in place of rabies certificates, they responded with they weren't sure.
              There are a couple of problems with titers. First, no one knows exactly what levels are actually protective because titers only measure on response of the immune system, and what they really indicate is that the animal was exposed and his immune system mounted a response. But we don't know if the entire immune system mounted a response, of if that response was adequate. It's also true that a low titer level doesn't necessarily mean the animal needs a booster. It just means he hasn't had any supsequent exposure, so there's no reason for his immune system to keep responding.

              What it boils down to is this; high titers do not necessarily indicate immunity, and low titers don't necessarily indicate lack of immunity.

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              • #8
                Here are other excellent articles by a Vet, that are packed full of info. In fact, his entire site is packed full of interesting articles on a variety of k9 topics:

                Michael W. Fox BVetMed, PhD, DSc, MRCVS


                GENETICALLY ENGINEERED & MODIFIED LIVE VIRUS VACCINES: PUBLIC HEALTH AND ANIMAL WELFARE CONCERNS:

                http://www.twobitdog.com/DrFox/speci...9-cca1d1a81c38


                CONFLICTS OF INTEREST IN THE VETERINARY PROFESSION AND THE ORIGIN OF ‘MAN- MADE’ DOG AND CAT DISEASES:

                http://www.twobitdog.com/DrFox/speci...5-cb1778647ad5

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                • #9
                  I won't state my opinion of Dr. Fox. But no matter what these articles say, you can't deny that veterinarians around the country are starting to see a disturbing trend in the incidence of distemper and parvo.

                  Like I said, I've been a proponent of long term immunity, and don't vaccinate yearly. I agreed with the people who think we over vaccinate our pets. Lab research may suggest that is the case, but it's not working out that way in the real world.

                  Those of us who were around when parvo first hit...you know what I mean. We don't want a repeat of THAT!

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                  • #10
                    Helly, I'd still love to see links to the articles you mentioned that indicate a resurgance in distemper and parvo in adult dogs that were vaccinated as puppies. I'm just not finding these articles and can't imagine that if this is indeed true, that the vet community would want to hide the information. With vet schools indicating yearly vaccinations as unnessary, I'm still leaning towards less vaccination. I've lost puppies to both diseases, yet still believe these are puppy diseases that are low risk to my adult dogs on a 3 year vaccination schedule.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by SwissNChow View Post
                      Helly, I'd still love to see links to the articles you mentioned that indicate a resurgance in distemper and parvo in adult dogs that were vaccinated as puppies. I'm just not finding these articles and can't imagine that if this is indeed true, that the vet community would want to hide the information. With vet schools indicating yearly vaccinations as unnessary, I'm still leaning towards less vaccination. I've lost puppies to both diseases, yet still believe these are puppy diseases that are low risk to my adult dogs on a 3 year vaccination schedule.
                      I don't know how to make this any clearer. You can't find links to things that are not on the internet. And conversations between vets (I know quite a few) usually don't make it on the internet. Some alerts that come to us via fax probably aren't being posted on the internet, either. I can't give you something that doesn't exist. Perhaps you could ask the vets in your area if they've seen any recent cases of parvo or distemper in adult, previously vaccinated dogs.

                      Time will tell. Like I said, I felt the same way you do in the past. Now I'm not so sure. I'm back at "the jury is still out" on this one.

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                      • #12
                        I think I'm still pretty comfortable following vet school recommendations. If there really is an outbreak, can't imagine they are going to keep it a secret from people. Until then, it just sounds like more hype. While I appreciate your caution, I'm not out of the loop of the vet circles and so far you are the only one I have heard this from.

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                        • #13
                          Ive heard also that if a pet has cancer they do not have to be vacinated. This was from a holistic vet.

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