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Shampoo to use on GSD for hot spots?

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  • Shampoo to use on GSD for hot spots?

    My GSD, who is 6, has a tendency to get hot spots. They occur mostly near her tail. Is there a shampoo and/or conditioner you would recommend to take care of this? I have some oatmeal shampoo from the vet, but that only seems to give her relief for a few days. Thank you for your help!

  • #2
    Espree makes a coal tar sulfa shampoo that is supposed to be good for bad skin allergies but I am not sure about if the hotspots are very raw. You can also bathe your dog more often till everything starts healing up. My friends frenchie recently broke out one of the worst allergy rashes I have seen, and after an emergency trip to the vet allergist, she got daily steroids and medicated bath everyday for two weeks. They have a vet visit scheduled for after it to figure out a more long term plan but if the shampoo only gives her relief for three days you may have to bathe her every third day till it heals up and talk to your vet about a more sustainable treatment. Obviously I am no expert on canine allergies but those are my two cents.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by kated View Post
      My GSD, who is 6, has a tendency to get hot spots. They occur mostly near her tail. Is there a shampoo and/or conditioner you would recommend to take care of this? I have some oatmeal shampoo from the vet, but that only seems to give her relief for a few days. Thank you for your help!
      Do you feed dry kibble? I swear there's not enough nutritious oils in dry food for dogs (probably because it would go rancid sitting on a shelf or exposed to heat.) I add oils to my dogs diet and I've seen good results for dogs prone to hot spots. Just my own experience tho. I usually use fish oil of some kind either cod liver or omega 3 tabs. Not a quick fix, but in the long run it might stop the hot spots.
      A Light exists in Spring, Not present on the Year, At any other period -- When March is scarcely here...~~ Emily Dickensen~~

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      • #4
        If it were my dog, I would use a Chlorhexidine Gluconate (CHG) soap (surgical scrub) bought from the vet and use that on the hotspots, while bathing the rest of the dog in a hypoallergenic shampoo (B2B makes a nice one - no fragrance or colour added). The CHG has on average a 6 hour residual in the skin, so washing the affected areas a few times a day will work wonders. I would be extra sure to make sure the dog is dry, dry, dry after the bath. Bacteria like a nice moist area to live and grow in. The CHG will dry out the hotspots nicely. You can get a CHG shampoo for the whole dog, if you like. With CHG, you can condition the coat without interfering with the residual anti-bacterial effects.
        "The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go." ~Dr. Seuss

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        • #5
          You may want to try a different type of food........ my GSD seems to do best with lamb and rice. Before the switch he was very itchy and did get a couple hotspots. I found the best way to get rid or the hotspots was to wipe them down several times a day with witchhazel. It is also extremely important to make sure you get all the shampoo out after bathing.

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          • #6
            Bactine

            Bactine can be used very effectively on hot spots. The thing is, you say she gets relief for a few days from certain shampoos, which seems to indicate that there is something recurring causing hot spots. Fleas? Try a Capstar pill if you think it is a flea. Topical flea treatments take a while to kill a flea, so the dang thing can bite repeatedly, and allergic dogs suffer more. Capstar kills a flea quickly and then is out of the dog's system in 24 hours. Love it for my allergic Bichon. Comfortis lasts longer if you need more constant flea killing.

            Anal sacs? Or a problem with the gland in the tail near the base? Don't know - I really would suspect a flea or other insect bite (ant/spider, whatever) from the recurring nature. Bactine will calm the spot for a while, and can be reapplied each time the dog starts itching, but if the dog KEEPS biting, I would still suspect a flea. Of course, good food won't hurt, but the positioning of the hot spot(s) makes me think it is not a food problem.

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            • #7
              My 10 yr old had recurring hot spots for the last 2 summers and the last one kept going into winter. I switched her food to a fish based grain free food and no more oily skin, odor or hot spots. She will also get hot spots from even 1 little flea, highly allergic. As she gets older she just becomes more sensitive to ingredients in her food and she just couldn't tolerate the rice anymore, it was already free of corn wheat and soy. So really, look at the food, she could have developed an allergy to something she has eaten for years. It happens.
              I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free.
              -Michelangelo

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              • #8
                Thank you everyone!

                The hotspots aren't raw, yet. We are going to try adding oil to her food. We do feed lamb and rice dry food, canned food (beef) and brown rice. She was having problems with not very firm waste and having to get her anal glands expressed at the vet too often. They suggested that to firm them up and it has worked. No more anal glands problems! She is also on Advantage flea treatment, so I don't think it's that. Where would I get the B2B shampoo? Do I have to order it? I have been thinking about using a hypoallergenic shampoo. I will make sure she is rinsed really well next time I bathe her. You all are very helpful. Thanks again!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by kated View Post
                  The hotspots aren't raw, yet. .... I will make sure she is rinsed really well next time I bathe her. You all are very helpful. Thanks again!
                  Just a note about shampooing. My vet has told me that a hot spot is actually 100% humidity at the surface of the hot spot. Drying it out is what is required.
                  A Light exists in Spring, Not present on the Year, At any other period -- When March is scarcely here...~~ Emily Dickensen~~

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kated View Post
                    My GSD, who is 6, has a tendency to get hot spots. They occur mostly near her tail. Is there a shampoo and/or conditioner you would recommend to take care of this? I have some oatmeal shampoo from the vet, but that only seems to give her relief for a few days. Thank you for your help!
                    Espree also makes an awesome medicated shampoo and a conditioner. I helps to relieve skin irritations and helps to repair damaged skin and coat. I have been using it on a GSD who has seasonal allegies and it has worked great.

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                    • #11
                      Shampoo isn't going to fix this. You have to figure out what's triggering the hot spots, which are usually staph infections. The most common cause is flea allergy dermatitis. The Advantage may not be working, or working fast enough. Try Comfortis if you can get it. It's not topical, and starts killing fleas in as little as 30 minutes. Spot ons take much longer, so fleas have the chance to bite more than once before they die. With Comfortis, it's one feed, and die.

                      If you have to, get a second opinion from another vet. Try to find one that's willing to treat this aggressively; find the cause, then treat, rather than just treat the symptoms.

                      The best thing I have ever seen for treating hot spots is TanSal. It's something our vets make up in the pharmacy, a mixture of tanic and salicylic acids. Ask your vet about it.

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                      • #12
                        At the pasadena groom expo in one of the seminars a Chris Christensen product called Peace & Kindness was talked about. They said it was good for just about any kind of skin ailment. I bought a bottle at the show and it says on the bottle "The Ultimate Miracle in Skin Care Naturally". ON the back it says it is good for topical use on Hot Spots, Cuts, Scrapes, Open Sores, Ear Infections, Fungus, Itchy Areas, Parasitic Infections (viral & fungal), Blood Parasotes, Ringworm, Dematitis, Virus (all forms), Yeast Infections, Seborrhea, Scaling or Dandruff and sSkin Irritations Caused From Allergic Reactions. Wow! With all of that I had to buy a bottle. Haven't had to use it yet but the ingredients are: 100% Distilled Structured Water with .999 Pure Silver, Colloidal Silver 30ppm. My husband mentioned that they use the silver on bad burns and he has used something similar on one of his horses and says it is the best. I thought with owning livestock, sometimes they do get ringworm and it says it can be used for that.

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                        • #13
                          [QUOTE=dbarcreations<3westies;401833]At the pasadena groom expo in one of the seminars a Chris Christensen product called Peace & Kindness was talked about. They said it was good for just about any kind of skin ailment. I bought a bottle at the show and it says on the bottle "The Ultimate Miracle in Skin Care Naturally". ON the back it says it is good for topical use on Hot Spots, Cuts, Scrapes, Open Sores, Ear Infections, Fungus, Itchy Areas, Parasitic Infections (viral & fungal), Blood Parasotes, Ringworm, Dematitis, Virus (all forms), Yeast Infections, Seborrhea, Scaling or Dandruff and sSkin Irritations Caused From Allergic Reactions. Wow! QUOTE]

                          Wow? Can we say snake oil? Personally, I find a lot of the things listed here to be in error. Like "...Parasitic Infections (viral and fungal)..." Which is it, a parasite, a virus, or a fungus? Fungal infections are not parasitic infections, neither are viral infections. Parasites are infestations, not infections. And there's nothing going that will cure everything. Viral infections in particular are not something we can cure. As any AIDS victim. Blood parasites? Cured by a topical preperation? Don't think so.

                          If it sounds to good to be true....well you know what they say.

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                          • #14
                            Well you might be right about it being too good too be true (and you might be wrong) lol. If I ever have need to use it, I will post the results. I do believe it was someone on this board that was giving the seminar that it was talked about. If so, and they read this post, maybe they will chim in.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Helly View Post
                              If it sounds to good to be true....well you know what they say.
                              I tried it. I know they make a lot of good products...but don't feel this is one of them. Kind of gave me false hope when I was grasping for solutions w/ my cat. Not quite sure the added moist environment...didn't actually make things a little worse?

                              I like CatCrazy's suggestion, and there are alot of other valid tips here as well.
                              Personally...Malaseb worked wonders on dogs I had moist eczema/dermatitis/hot spot issues with...but it is not available for who knows how long.....
                              Often it's not what you say, but how you say it.

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