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Pediatric spay/neuter experiences?

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  • Pediatric spay/neuter experiences?

    I'm sure most of you are aware that some vets do spay/neuters on puppies and kittens as early as 8 weeks of age. I'm wondering if anyone here has had a puppy or kitten done that early, or at less than 16 weeks, and what your experience has been. Any complications, either at time of surgery, or later in life.

    Whizzy was neutered at 12 weeks. Not by my choice, the rescue group will not place an animal that isn't spayed/neutered. So they had him neutered. So far we've dealt with an infection at the incision site, and a UTI. And that slowed his progress in the house training department. I'm fully aware that infection can happen no matter what age the animal is neutered. But I do believe his house training would have progressed much faster if we hadn't had to deal with the discomfort he experienced due to the surgery and infections.

    I've also read several studies on both sides of the fence, and rebuttals of those studies on both sides of the fence. It's hard to know who to believe. That's partly why I'm curious about other people's experiences.

    If any of you have had an animal spayed or neutered at an early age, what I'd like to know is this:

    Do you think it caused problems with house training?

    Has your pet experienced repeated UTIs, vaginitis (if female) or if you have a male cat, has he experienced repeated urinary problems or blockages?

    Has your pet grown unusually tall?

    Has your pet experienced joint problems that you or your vet think could be attributed to the early spay/neuter?

    Has your pet been diagnosed with osteosarcoma or any other form of cancer?

  • #2
    Early Neuter

    If any of you have had an animal spayed or neutered at an early age, what I'd like to know is this:

    Do you think it caused problems with house training?

    Has your pet experienced repeated UTIs, vaginitis (if female) or if you have a male cat, has he experienced repeated urinary problems or blockages?

    Has your pet grown unusually tall?

    Has your pet experienced joint problems that you or your vet think could be attributed to the early spay/neuter?

    Has your pet been diagnosed with osteosarcoma or any other form of cancer?[/QUOTE]

    We adopted our Blue Heeler through a rescue group and he was neutered at approximately 12 weeks of age. He had no problems with house training or urinary problems. He did grow quite tall for a Heeler. We had to put him to sleep about a month ago due to an advanced tumor that was eating into his spine. He was six years old.

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    • #3
      Teething time =spay time

      Hi Helly, I had to have Jax neutered dur to one testicle decended. He was approx just 3 mos. Travi-So handsome I wanted to see if any breeders wanted his RRampage Rep genes first. He was approx 3 mos. Halle 5 mos...before first season. All ok but not toally dog door trained. I have to close door or they Bark, Bark bark, and I don't want complaints from neighbors. I have watched neuters and spays at humane society...they say early is safer, less blood. With my Candy, pic with braids, I didn't get permission until she was4 and blind w/ PRA as a test litter.She took much longer due to more blood. 45 mins...I was nervous. A very experienced vet can do a spay in not kidding 10 min flat under anesthesia. Nueters are very snip quick w/ no stitches..uses own skin strings. Not bloody, not sQueemish at all.They clain no cancer if ya don't have the organs.

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      • #4
        Those are all great questions

        I've always been opposed to pediatric sterilization, even when we performed them (briefly) at one of the vet hospitals I worked in. Most of the problems we saw were in anesthesia dosages and incisions healing poorly.

        In the grand scheme of things, tampering with the endocrine system, is counterproductive to proper growth. As you know, humans and animals were designed to produce adequate amounts of specific hormones at precise stages in life. In optimum circumstances, everything functions properly for well balanced health. It only makes sense to me that if you remove or tamper with that process...something's going to backfire.

        I'm not saying don't sterilize your pets, merely that it is LESS intrusive to do so when they are nearly of reproductive age. Of course, the risk of mammary tumors and prostrate cancer is decreased if you spay or neuter close to that time also, based again on the reduction of hormones.

        You, unfortunately, didn't have a choice. I'm sorry to hear that you are having problems with your little guy. He's a cute little fella'. Hopefully everything will clear up soon without reoccurrence.

        Jodie

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        • #5
          I don't like the idea

          But have not had my own dog spayed or neutered that early. I have had a couple of customers who believe that their dogs mid-life incontinence was caused by early spay. I have read that that is a concern. My area's laws say spay or neuter by 4 months,unless approved due to showing or performance events. Still seems young to me, but since I show my dogs, I only can think how easy it would be to spay or neuter and think why would anybody with a pet not do that, btw.
          Money will buy you a pretty good dog but it won't buy the wag of it's tail.

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          • #6
            i had my chihuahua fixed at 4 months and she is a very healthy dog she is still young only 6yrs, i also have a cat that was fixed at 12weeks and he is also very healthy i take him to the vet just for regular check ups but he is kind of young too only 8yrs old but he has never gotten sick (nock on wood)he is an inside cat i dont know if that makes a difference. i also have 2 pitbulls that got fixed at around 4 yrs old and they are 12 yrs now and are healthy dogs the male seems to have a little bit of trouble getting up in the a.m but apart from arthritis it could just be his age. helly this is a hard one to answer because i have both situations and they are all healthy pets.

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            • #7
              My breeder suggested that I wait until my (min poodle) puppy was at least eight months before spay. She was spayed at about 8 1/2 months. I actually don't know why she preferred the pup wait so long -- I had assumed we'd do it at six months. I have not heard of any problems with the early spay/nueter.

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              • #8
                I had a few barn kittens spayed/neutered at 8 weeks. The doctor doing the surgery assured me that it was easier on the kittens at this age.

                In any case, they all grew up just fine, no health issues whatsoever that I am aware of. They all healed wonderfully.

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                • #9
                  Not early

                  We had Tobler done when she was 6 months old and she immediately got a UTI following the surgery. They kept re-occuring for the next year and yes, that really slowed the house breaking. She also had had bladder leaking since she was spayed. has been on Proin since she was 6 months old.
                  If your dog is fat, you are not getting enough exercise!

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                  • #10
                    K-State University did a study in conjunction with KSDS about 12 years ago. They did the study on KSDS pups because they can TRACK the progress of each dog's growth, behavior, health etc over the entire life of the dog. They altered half of each litter at 8 weeks and the remainder were to be altered at the traditional 6 months.

                    I raised one of the early spayed pups, and she had absolutely no problems, was quick to housetrain, healthy, happy, active--and had a normal-length career as a guide dog. Puppies that young heal MUCH quicker than those who are not growing as rapidly.

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                    • #11
                      My Catahoula was adopted from an SPCA that had them spayed or neutered at adoption time. Libby was 4 mos, and has had no health problems, and grew to the correct height. She had no post surgical issues. She was mostly housebroken when I got her anyhow, so I can't really comment on that. I read a few articles on pediatric spays/neuters and they found with kittens that they ended up much leggier than littermates neutered/spayed at an older age, but they didn't say why that would be. Until I learn of any health benefits from pediatric spays as opposed to spaying an older puppy, I'm still kind of leery about the pediatric spay thing .

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                      • #12
                        Our Chocolate/Chesapeake mix was neutered at 7 or 8 weeks because of the adoption facility requirement. Knock on wood, no problems. Great dog. A bit wimpy at times and was a grumpy only child wannabe at age 1. Not too fond of other dogs unless they're completely ignoring him. I was upset about that requirement too. I thought it would disrupt his hormone, etc. development.

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                        • #13
                          Interesting reading. Don't know how much of it I believe. But food for thought.

                          http://www.caninesports.com/SpayNeuter.html

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                          • #14
                            I have a Golden Retriever/Ridgeback that I adopte from the Humane Society. She was already spayed at 7 weeks. I was very surprised because I thought that was quite early to do that. My dad bred dogs and I have always known that if you are going to spay, it should be after their first season. So far, she doesn't have any health problems and housebreakin her was a snap. She is quite an intelligent dog and started using the doggy door about 3 weeks after I got her.

                            I, too, am a little ify on pediatic spay/nneuter. I think the dog/cats need to just mature a bit. I am not against spy/neuter because I think we are so over populated with unwanted animals, which only a small percentage will find good homes. My cat is also spayed. She was spayed at 3 months. No health problems there except for her boeing overweight, which started about 3 months after she was spayed. I feed her a less active cat food and she has never lost the weight. The spaying also seemed to have made her lazy, even as a kitten. So, of course, she was never very active.

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                            • #15
                              Wow Helly.

                              That article sure is food for thought.
                              Money will buy you a pretty good dog but it won't buy the wag of it's tail.

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