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  • Question on wages

    I have been a groomer for almost 6 years now. Before that I worked as a veterinary technician. I have a lot of experience in this field and know I could bring a lot to the table. I am patient with both animals and clients and feel I am very easy to work with. I interviewed at a new shop yesterday and they offered me a wage of $10 an hour plus 20% commission on every dog you do. This would be a side job for me because I have been working at another shop for over 3 years now. I make 50% commission there. As much as I try to figure it out it just doesn't nearly match what I make at my other job. They said they were open to negotiations but I'm not at all sure what to ask for. They currently have a groomer there and they said she accepted that wage but she has only been grooming for a little while. They seemed like really great people and I would like to work something out with them. Any help would be appreciated on this topic! Thank you so much

  • #2
    If you are responsible for your own equipment and maintaining it nothing less than 50% commission. Don't under value your worth no matter how nice the people are.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by janice524 View Post
      If you are responsible for your own equipment and maintaining it nothing less than 50% commission. Don't under value your worth no matter how nice the people are.


      ^^^THIS!

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      • #4
        As an employer, I will never again pay 50% commission....I've stopped giving HALF my business way to employees. In fact, it is actually MORE then half when you figure in my part of payroll taxes, etc

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        • #5
          Are the prices the same, less or more than the other shop?

          Either way doing simple math I'm coming up with more money not less.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by cockerlvr View Post
            Are the prices the same, less or more than the other shop?

            Either way doing simple math I'm coming up with more money not less.
            This largeley depends on where you live and work, because my SALES amount today was $570 in 7 hours, with no bathing/prepping help.That's on a Thursday, one of my slower days of the week. Saturdays are obviously my big selling days.

            For a groomer making a $10/hour + 20% scheme on a day like today, the wage would be $100 less per day compared to a 50% groomer.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Moo View Post
              This largeley depends on where you live and work, because my SALES amount today was $570 in 7 hours, with no bathing/prepping help.That's on a Thursday, one of my slower days of the week. Saturdays are obviously my big selling days.

              For a groomer making a $10/hour + 20% scheme on a day like today, the wage would be $100 less per day compared to a 50% groomer.
              That's my problem, I know I can pull in $500.00+ in sales for a salon in a full shift, the problem is, I'm not that charitable to give away more than half, considering I did 100% of the work.... (albeit I am a special case because I know how much it costs to groom any given dog)

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              • #8
                Originally posted by DogGamut View Post
                That's my problem, I know I can pull in $500.00+ in sales for a salon in a full shift, the problem is, I'm not that charitable to give away more than half, considering I did 100% of the work.... (albeit I am a special case because I know how much it costs to groom any given dog)
                Half of the labor on that particular dog. You're not doing half of the marketing, or half of the overhead, or half of the maintenance on the salon. Dogs don't just magically appear as clients. Do you actually know how much it costs to groom a dog in that salon factoring workman's comp, insurance, shampoo, unemployment insurance, bandannas, bows, cleaning supplies, rent, utilities, etc?

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                • #9
                  Amen SetterGirl !

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by SetterGirl View Post
                    Half of the labor on that particular dog. You're not doing half of the marketing, or half of the overhead, or half of the maintenance on the salon. Dogs don't just magically appear as clients. Do you actually know how much it costs to groom a dog in that salon factoring workman's comp, insurance, shampoo, unemployment insurance, bandannas, bows, cleaning supplies, rent, utilities, etc?
                    Those are all variable, some people can pay 300% more for the same things. I just want to work for a place with proven good systems, lower pay than the standard is a red flag of not good systems. That doesn't mean they aren't helping animals. It just means it's harder, more stressful, and less beneficial.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DogGamut View Post
                      That's my problem, I know I can pull in $500.00+ in sales for a salon in a full shift, the problem is, I'm not that charitable to give away more than half, considering I did 100% of the work.... (albeit I am a special case because I know how much it costs to groom any given dog)
                      Are you kidding me.....do you know how much it cost the owner of the salon to run a business.......you finish your groom and go home and put your feet up, meanwhile the own runs the "behind scenes" 24/7. Who ordered the supplies that you use, who keeps the equipment running tip-top, who pays the utilities, rent, insurance, cleaning cost, advertisements, quarterly taxes, laundry....... that's right.....NOT YOU.

                      Happy spotting another Millennium gal

                      Dolly's Barking Bubbles, LLC

                      www.dollysbarkingbubbles.com

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                      • #12
                        I could see paying a hefty50% commission to an IC who came in to cover overload during holiday or an overload day or week and then they had no regular job with the owner. But for a regular employee I can't see how a business survives and it makes sense why so many small businesses don't seem to have modern equipment like a good bathing system, or back saving tubs and tables etc because they have no money.

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                        • #13
                          Would you be an employee or an "IC"? That makes a difference because of taxes.

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                          • #14
                            I remember when admin said something on the service industry that stuck with me and John Stazko said same thing. Not saying they said to pay 30% commission, but in the US the standard ANY member of any service industry tries to keep the cost of labor at 30 to 33% of its gross revenue. So right there at 50% grooming's cost of labor is one of the highest in all of the US. 55% and 60% is double the recommended standard for doing business in the US.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by coldnose View Post
                              I remember when admin said something on the service industry that stuck with me and John Stazko said same thing. Not saying they said to pay 30% commission, but in the US the standard ANY member of any service industry tries to keep the cost of labor at 30 to 33% of its gross revenue. So right there at 50% grooming's cost of labor is one of the highest in all of the US. 55% and 60% is double the recommended standard for doing business in the US.
                              That's not the case, there may be a number of standard labor rates, each one based on the general skill sets of the employees presumed to be engaged in the related work. If there is only a single standard labor rate, it should be based on a weighted average of the fully burdened labor costs of those employees most likely to be engaged in the related work.

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