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Becoming a Ic or Table Renter?

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  • Becoming a Ic or Table Renter?

    Apologies for the long post. I have been at my current job for about 6 months, it is a pet store with a grooming buisness in back, and came on completely clueless that I could not be a employee and a 1099. I ended this 2015 as both, now that I have learned this and questioned my employer she spoke with our accountant and was told she couldn't afford me otherwise among other things. My employer realized what they had been doing was wrong but we have to refigure my pay structure. I was hourly with 20% commission, but they cannot afford to pay my taxes etc to put my commission on my W2. I love my job at this location so I need to come to the table offering an alternative so I can stay. I built the salon up and doubled the sales and clientele in my short time there. So I was thinking of becoming a table renter, I am currently the only hroomer and run the entire grooming buisness aside from purchasing products, so that wouldn't be much of a change for me. But where do I even begin as far as what all I need to do so? I have to go to my current employer with my offer on monday. But as I said I really don't even know where to begin. Thanks in advance!

  • #2
    I'm considering booth rental as well. Never done it before so I am no expert, but based on what I I've been reading I started with getting a quote for professional liability insurance since I'll essentially be my own business. Then I did some reading on what taxes an IC is required to pay. You're responsible for keeping track of your own income. Now, knowing I can handle both of those things (although it's going to be a lot more bookkeeping then I had to do as an employee!) I've been reading booth renter contracts and seeing how they're worded to protect both me and the shop owner. Hoping you get another reply as I'm curious what a veteran renter has to say. Really hope it works out for you!

    Sent from my SM-N910T using Tapatalk

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Lucha View Post
      I'm considering booth rental as well. Never done it before so I am no expert, but based on what I I've been reading I started with getting a quote for professional liability insurance since I'll essentially be my own business. Then I did some reading on what taxes an IC is required to pay. You're responsible for keeping track of your own income. Now, knowing I can handle both of those things (although it's going to be a lot more bookkeeping then I had to do as an employee!) I've been reading booth renter contracts and seeing how they're worded to protect both me and the shop owner. Hoping you get another reply as I'm curious what a veteran renter has to say. Really hope it works out for you!

      Sent from my SM-N910T using Tapatalk
      A good contract will explain much that is required of you. However, never rely on the contract to tell you what the federal, state or local government expects of you, even the Dept of Agriculture in some states. To all of them you are "self-employed." Things may operate differently as a pet groomer had you rented a commercial building, but operations is operations. So make sure you meet all the laws as a self-employed person with the various government agencies including the IRS, state tax agencies, sales tax if applicable, business name (you can have a business name other than using your personal legal name but that must be filed with the appropriate agency of your state or county where you operate), local business licenses you may have to hang at your booth, etc. Quite often the local office (sometimes it's a county clerk or state office) where you file the fictitious name (doing business as) distribute helpful packages to new businesses letting them know other things expected of them, and sometimes local Chamber of Commerce does the same help. You are definitely going to pay taxes quite differently to the IRS and state etc compared to being an employee. You will file a long form 1040, Schedule C and Schedule SE at minimum to IRS because are you are self-employed and you can operating expenses such as your booth rent, supplies you purchase, business mileage, phone, advertising, insurance, apparel, tools etc and deduct from the gross sales of your services. Self employed persons pay taxes quarterly, not only annually with the forms mentioned. You make estimated payments instead 4 times a year and they are very important to make. If there is a local SBA or SBDC office or SCORE group in your area, they can help and sometimes offer small business courses or counseling, sometimes even free.
      Most questions regarding GroomerTALK are answered in the Board Help Talk Forum. Thanks for coming to our community a part of PetGroomer.com https://www.petgroomer.com.

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