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  • Make sure your groomer's cut above

    http://www.detnews.com/article/20100...338/1005/rss32
    Associated Press

    Does your dog need grooming? Here are some tips for choosing a dog groomer, according to Gail Buchwald of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty for Animals:

    • Ask for recommendations from your veterinarian, friends or family.

    • Check with the Better Business Bureau to see if there are any complaints against the groomer.

    • Visit the facility. Is it clean? How does it smell? How do they handle the dogs? Is there a lot of barking?

    • Ask about the groomer's experience and how he or she learned to groom. Did the person attend a grooming school? If educated by a master groomer, who is that master groomer? Is the groomer certified?

    • Does the groomer allow the owner to be present during grooming? "In general, an animal is going to be more relaxed when the owner is present," she said. However, this isn't necessarily a deal breaker, she said.

    • Make sure the facility requires dogs to be up to date on vaccinations.



    From The Detroit News: http://www.detnews.com/article/20100...#ixzz0fFHDHBVs
    Most questions regarding GroomerTALK are answered in the Board Help Talk Forum. Thanks for coming to our community a part of PetGroomer.com https://www.petgroomer.com.

  • #2
    The pet is more relaxed when the owner is present? REALLY? Not when the owner is one of those "helicopter" owners who fusses over Fifi and baby talks the entire time.

    I allow owners to look inside the van, ask all the questions they want, I even open the compartment door so they can peek through the windshield if they are very anxious. But having the owner INSIDE the van? There's no room! As my husband says, grooming in a vehicle the size of an Ford E-350 is akin to grooming in a telephone booth.

    The rest of the article is fine in my humble opinion.
    "With God's help, all things are possible!"
    Laura Lee Ray
    I am kats_melody on eGroomer. Follow my Twitter tweets - @ZOOMGROOM on Twitter.com

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    • #3
      I also have an E350 extended van, but I do allow clients to stay if they so choose. I let them know it might be a bit of a tight fit but they never have a problem staying out of my way. I can't say I agree that pets are more relaxed with the owners there, I think the owners are more relaxed when they can be with their pet. I do it because I'M a helicopter mom, LOL, and know I would want to be there to watch. I have insurance for this as well since I had planned on allowing owners inside. I have about 4 that stay with me while I groom. I enjoy having someone to chat with, besides the dog of course. When I worked in a salon and I had owners stay I had a few dogs that would bite with the owner there, but be fine when they stepped out, for certain things. Like nails or ears. So I would just ask mom to step outside for that particular part. I find dogs are much worse when they can see their owner but not reach them, so I have them right at the table. Not that there is any choice in that inside the van!
      What a caterpillar considers the end of his world, we call a butterfly.

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      • #4
        I would have to go with Kats Melody on this one. I have very few dogs that relax when their owner is present...I have very few dogs that relax when other owners are present, come to think of it, lol. I have let owners stay, but I try to discourage it for the most part...

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        • #5
          What in the heck does barking have to do with good grooming???? I did a straight thru on a blind, 17 year old Shih on Monday. I went slow, gave her breaks & hand dried her so she was never stressed. Soon as I got done, put her in the cage with a blankie,, she barked at every noise untill mom came to pick her up. Mom commented that she must feel much better cause she was barking and acting like her old self,,,lmao

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          • #6
            I have several problems with that article! First; is the groomer certified? There are many of us out here that are not certified and are d*mn good groomers. I am not certified as I can't travel much to get to testing sites. I have two young children and a husband that works full-time and is on-call when not working; not to mention very few of my clients keep their pets in a breed specific style for me to use. Second, barking dogs are a problem? Heck, my shop will be silent except for my music playing until ANY owner walks in and all dogs go nuts barking hoping they are the one to be going. Third, pets are more relaxed with the owner present? Not with my clients, if they happen to come early and I'm not done with their pet, the pets go nuts and jerk thier heads all over wanting to be in mom or dad's lap. My clients are NOT allowed to stay for a full grooming on their pet. If they want to see how I handle dogs, they are invited to stay and watch while I groom a pet other than theirs.
            Lisa VanVleet, RVT

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Admin View Post
              [url]
              • Does the groomer allow the owner to be present during grooming? "In general, an animal is going to be more relaxed when the owner is present," she said. However, this isn't necessarily a deal breaker, she said.
              I actually tell clients to look for that, not because the dogs will be better with the owner present, but because it shows there is nothing to hide. I also have told owners that groomers may be apprehensive and why, but if there is absolutely no way you can stay-than it is a red flag. Very few owners would actually stay. I know it is kind of controversial, but I think it works too.

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              • #8
                I actually like the design of a reception where owners see chairs or bench and it looks as if we offer them the right to stay. Wtithout any words the design says something that the business accommodates the preferences of the owner.

                But reading this article, are we talking about staying as in standing next to the groomer during grooming, or sitting in a reception area perhaps out of sight? That's 2 different scenarios where in the pet actually might be distracted by having the owner there with the groomer. We actuallly had customers realize they were distracting the pet having seen with their own eyes and didn't stay at future appointments.

                Certainly can make a difference with some pets. We always allowed and ecouraged Chow Chow owners to stand with the groomer for 1 or 2 groomings and that worked well for most Chows and Chow mixes to bond with the groomer.

                Over the years before anyone offered daycare for pets, we found that the majority of our clientele actually liked the time freed of pet care responsibilities. In fact, our weekly clients were weekly because it was "mom's time off" to go to club meetings etc and not leave pets home alone.
                Most questions regarding GroomerTALK are answered in the Board Help Talk Forum. Thanks for coming to our community a part of PetGroomer.com https://www.petgroomer.com.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by scullysmom View Post
                  I actually tell clients to look for that, not because the dogs will be better with the owner present, but because it shows there is nothing to hide. I also have told owners that groomers may be apprehensive and why, but if there is absolutely no way you can stay-than it is a red flag. Very few owners would actually stay. I know it is kind of controversial, but I think it works too.
                  Sorry Scully, but I have a big big problem with groomers who tell clients that. I do not let owners stay with the dogs EVER. In my opinion they are more likely to bite me or be unruly when their mom or dad is around. Not only that, do you know that if their own dog bit them that they could sue You? I don't need the stress or the liability.
                  I have absolutely nothing to hide. My reputation speaks for itself. The way I handle the dogs when they come in the door reassures most owners that their bundle of fluff is in kind, loving, professional hands. Not letting them stay is as much for their pets safety as it is for my own.

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                  • #10
                    I know there are for sure exceptions to the rule, but the clients I have told this to are Military. They do not have any real frame of reference to reputation when moving to a new location. I have always told them to check the salon first in person and only on the second time make an appointment. Make sure they don’t see dogs hanging out on tables alone (for any reason), that if they need they can bring thier own products, to check how the place smells, see were the dogs are (red flag= room with no dogs but they can hear them in the back) and finally to ask if they can stay while their dog is groomed. I have always told these clients why the groomer would not want them to stay, but if you have no real frame of reference, a groomer can really put lipstick on a pig. I don't think anyone I have told this has any intention of staying. Now if clients have lived in the same area forever, or have family etc it is different, but transient communities do not keep good tabs regardless of practice. Some of the best groomers I know would not let people stay however, all of the worst groomers I knew also would not.

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                    • #11
                      If you get to my shop in the morning before anyone is dry you wont see a dog in sight. We put the dirty dogs in the bathing room cage bank and the front is reserved fot those who are finished and waiting on pickup.

                      Anyone is free to go anywhere in my shop, escorted, at any time. NO ONE is welcome to stay. It causes issues I do not want to deal with. PLUS they distract me. LOL Seriously distract me because they always want to talk.they ar ewelcome to sit in the rose garden though.....anytime. Including tomorrow when they are potentially buried in snow......
                      <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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                      • #12
                        ROFL, where does this guy get his ideas? Dog's more relaxed when the owner is present?

                        While I admit there are SOME dogs that are more relaxed, most, by far, are the opposite.

                        I have decided that I will allow owners to stay for the FIRST groom for their pet, but I prefer them NOT to stay after that. If they stay the first time during their pet's groom, they are not to:

                        A) Talk to the pet

                        B) Get eye contact with the pet

                        C) Touch the pet.

                        'Course, I'll say it much more politely than that, and explain why, but those 3 things are the problem with owners being present.

                        Tammy in Utah
                        Groomers Helper Affiliate

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Admin View Post
                          I actually like the design of a reception where owners see chairs or bench and it looks as if we offer them the right to stay. ... to go to club meetings etc and not leave pets home alone.

                          Here is my problem with the staying.
                          #1 - I have a 4 x 8 waiting room. I have a high counter with a half door. My grooming table it right there. I am working on a dog when the next client comes in to drop off their dog, their dogs goes straight to the tub if available with a bather. So if I let someone stay I would be letting them stand there and talk to me while I am working on someone elses pet and not giving that pet the full attention I should be because you know they are not going to stand there and be silent. I do not do straight through grooming.

                          #2 - I have alot of pets that will act out if anyone is in the room, even my bather. Some dogs don't like their nails clipped. The average customer is not used to this behavior with animals and some may take it that the dog is being hurt.

                          It is just way much easier for me not to allow it with anyone. I am not hiding anything and like I said you can see my grooming table right when you walk in.

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                          • #14
                            The problem with owners hanging out is that even if the does act ok, sometimes the owner does not.

                            I one had an owner/relative that kept grabbing her dog, taking off the noose, loosening so the dog could slip out and proclaiming "oh no! Your hurting her!" as I tried to trim the nails. She insisted the dog looked fine and wanted to leave with it before i could get it propery brushed or dried. Some people are so overly emotional with their pets that they view simple safety restraint or making a dog stand still as abuse or being mean to the dog - no matter how gentle you are.

                            Grooming is a procdeure that takes place between the groomer and the dog; there is no reason for an owner to be present and it only causes problems most of the time.

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                            • #15
                              I agree that the "dogs are more calm statement" is out of ignorance to the profession.. Most dogs become more rowdy, I have had only a rare few who mom and/or dads presence helped the situation..

                              Also, the vaccine.. I only require rabies as that is all the laws requires.. As one who does not vaccinate, I let my clients make that decision.. I feel that is a personal issue.

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