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  1. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Southern California
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    4,721

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    Quote Originally Posted by cockerlvr View Post
    Am I the only one who thinks this is odd? I mean I get that she was warned, but what's so bad about saying a dog is spoiled?
    I'm right there with ya... am sick and tired of the word and thought police telling us what we can say or not say.
    Debbie
    There's always room for another rose in the garden.

  2. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    SE Wash St
    Posts
    5,440

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    Sometimes it's not what you say, but how you say it. I've had clients tell me their pet is spoiled, and I will say something like 'not spoiled-loved'. If the bather was told not to use that word for whatever reason, and she continued to do so, then maybe she should be let go. The boss is the boss, and right or wrong, what the boss says goes. I do think it was a bit harsh and probably would've handled it differently.
    Old groomers never die, they just go at a slower clip.

    Groom on!!!

  3. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    647

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    A few months ago I cursed in front of a customer. He immediately said he was happy I felt comfortable enough with him to use that language. Flustered and angry at myself, I took him at face value and ended the conversation. But over the next few weeks it really bothered me, and his comment took on a sarcastic tone in my mind. I half expected him to call and cancel, but he showed up at his regular time. So while I worked on his dog I also worked out exactly what I wanted to say. I really enjoy giving my clients a grooming tool (a Kong ZoomGroom, a slicker, or comb) after their third or fourth visit. They are so surprised to receive that gift. This particular gentleman told me I cant stay in business if I give things away. So when he returned to pick up his dog I was ready. I reminded him of what he said, and told him, "You are wrong. I CAN afford to do little things like that for my customers. But what I CAN'T afford is to offend my clients, and I believe I offended you with my language the last time you were here. I am really very sorry that came out of my mouth." He of course hadn't thought twice about it, and was surprised that I had brought it up.
    A well thought out apology given sincerely goes a long way, and may well have cured that woman's mindless use of a phrase that offends some.

    And hey- I love love love vegetables. Crave them even. Just despise the "cutesy" shortening of the word. Don't know why. Makes steam come out of my ears. So weird.

  4. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Northern NV
    Posts
    4,885

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    Quote Originally Posted by KarlaSnyder View Post
    Sometimes it's not what you say, but how you say it. I've had clients tell me their pet is spoiled, and I will say something like 'not spoiled-loved'. If the bather was told not to use that word for whatever reason, and she continued to do so, then maybe she should be let go. The boss is the boss, and right or wrong, what the boss says goes. I do think it was a bit harsh and probably would've handled it differently.
    That's what I meant by I get she was warned. Policy is policy, but I honestly don't in ANY way get how saying a dog is spoiled is a bad thing. I mean sure, if you said something like, your dog is horrible for grooming, what a spoiled brat you have, why don't you teach her some manners. That's just insulting to the owner. If you say, Fluffy is one spoiled doggie, lucky her. I see nothing wrong with that.

  5. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    68

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    Yeah, it depends on how you say it, but maybe pampered is a better word.

  6. #18

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    Since I started this thread I finally got a chance to talk to the owner about why? She said on more than one occasion and it was surprises customers told her they didn't like to be called, associated with that. She was asked by one customer to tell the groomer she doesn't spoil her dog.

  7. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,049

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    Most business owners don't do something like this without a reason. Good to know.

  8. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Everywhere
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    10,590

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    I get that policy is policy but my dogs are spoiled and I know it. Most clients know their dog is spoiled. Not a bad thing for a well behaved dog to be. Heck, my horse and 800lb pig are spoiled, but also have good manners.
    I would think it would only offend owners that have dogs that don't have manners and they know it is due to the way they let them behave, so the owners of these dogs take it as an insult to themselves.
    Ain't always easy to stand up for what is right.

  9. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    139

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    Funny. The phrase something like that “your dog is spoiled” usually used by owners but not someone else. Otherwise it sounds sarcastic, at least not in a good way. Most of my clients tell me “my dog is so spoiled(rotten)” proudly and I reply like “yes, she/he is the queen/king of house”

  10. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    668

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    I used to work for an airline and the safety of people we knew words not to use, big time. Airlines such as one of the most reputed Singapore had great training. It really daesue isn't all thought police. Look at the people today with big triggers going postal. My first job grooming the owner was attacked by a woman throwing the retail items at her and her purse and cussing because we told her we found fleas. We had to call 911 just because we advised a customer her dog had fleas. Go figure. There are people today dangerously uptight.

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