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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
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    890

    Default Is my understanding of a rolling strip correct?

    That with a rolling strip, you only remove the longest hairs that are ready to pull out (in a nutshell, I know more is involved) right?

    I'm asking because, my clients who are slowly filtering through to me are/were being recommended to use a groomer who is brand new (sat a 60 hour course in January) and my very regular hand strip border was coming to me every 6 weeks for a strip and bath (took my all of an hour to do as owners do great up keep at home) and they used this new groomer. According to this groomer there is no such thing as rolling handstrippibg, that I've made up the term and really they should consider clipping as stripping hurts the dog. Little dog in question falls asleep during her strip and is always super excited to see me and gets jealous if I do other dogs.

    So to counteract these statements Im gonna do a face book post on hand stripping but I need to make sure my understanding is correct about rolling strips.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Capital Region, NY
    Posts
    1,698

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    Rolling or staging the coat is when you strip an area and then allow to grow while you strip the next. For example, If I want the furnishings to be longer I would strip them first. The next week I would strip down the jacket. This has allowed a week for the legs to start growing back in. The next week I would strip the head. Now the legs would have 3 weeks of growth, the jacket 2 Weeks. By the 4th week the coat should start to show the pattern I want based on where the stage of growth is on where I stripped.

    I hope that makes sense. Maybe Wild 4westies will comment as she's an avid handstripper. I do what I call "pet handstripping". No client I have is willing to truely dedicate themselves to weekely grooms and pay the fee. So we just do what sound like what you do is strip down to the undercoat and allow to grow back in carding the coat out inbetween till it's compleyely blown and strip it down again. The border terrier I do takes me about 2 hrs, but they only come in about 4-5 times a year. So I have to strip him down completely everytime. I'll post a couple articles I use for clients to help with learining about handstripping.
    It's not what you look at that matters; it's what you see.
    Henry David Thoreau

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Capital Region, NY
    Posts
    1,698

    Default

    It's not what you look at that matters; it's what you see.
    Henry David Thoreau

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
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    Capital Region, NY
    Posts
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    Default

    It's not what you look at that matters; it's what you see.
    Henry David Thoreau

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    12,193

    Default

    I'm going to disagree. Rolling is like you said. Building layers. Staging is totally different. I "roll" sporting dogs and terriers.

    When a coat is rolled it looks the same everytime.
    My Blog The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,546

    Default

    I agree with Parti. Rolling is keeping the coat looking the same AFTER it is staged.

    The dogs coat will eventually get to where 1/3 of the coat needs to be pulled, 1/3 is just where you want it as far as length is concerned plus it will be nearing the phase where it needs to be pulled, and 1/3 will be starting to grow.

    This 1/3 pulling happens on each section of the dog. So you pull down 1/3 of the jacket, the longest hairs, 1/3 of the head, 1/3 of the legs etc. This way you always have fresh new growth coming in.
    That’s why it’s called ‘rolling the coat’.

    You won’t be able to roll a coat forever. Eventually the coat will blow and you’ll need to pull the coat down to its underwear and start over.

    Staging, as Naturally Furry was describing is a technique that eventually gets the dog in the proper look ‘down the road’. This is the part that owners and beginning groomers often don’t understand.
    Dog comes in in a completely blown coat. You will strip the body parts that need to grow the longest first.
    So leg hair is longer then top of the head hair.
    Leg hair and jacket get pulled down.
    Dog goes home with near naked back and shorter leg hair, but head, neck, shoulders, are still long and bushy and in blown coat.
    Wait a week or so, and pull down the next area. Say back of neck.
    Wait another week or so and pull the next area. Say sides of neck.
    Etc Etc Etc
    The ears will be among the last to pull as they will be among the shortest part of the pattern.
    This can take anywhere from 6-12 weeks to finally have a dog that is groomed.
    It is a process for sure and most owner aren’t willing to do that to get their Schnauzer, Fox Terrier, Lakeland to look as they should.
    Some breeds are less tedious and require less staging. Border Terriers come to mind.

    Once you have gone through all that staging you can start rolling the coat.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    2,079

    Default

    So we agree on rolling but staging no. I did a few google searches on staging that they disagree among themselves!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    890

    Default

    When I've done searches for staged stripping, it takes me to breeders sites that show me dogs that are stripped bald to the the skin with the furnishings left. The longest areas are done first like the jacket and the shortest done last like the head cheeks and ears. Then this way the coat is all at correct length ready for the show.

    I did think a coat could be continuously rolled as you are always removing coat, not giving it a chance to get to the blown stage.

    Thank you for your replies it helps!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    GA
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    12,193

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marshmellow View Post
    When I've done searches for staged stripping, it takes me to breeders sites that show me dogs that are stripped bald to the the skin with the furnishings left. The longest areas are done first like the jacket and the shortest done last like the head cheeks and ears. Then this way the coat is all at correct length ready for the show.

    I did think a coat could be continuously rolled as you are always removing coat, not giving it a chance to get to the blown stage.

    Thank you for your replies it helps!
    That's true about staging.
    My Blog The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Capital Region, NY
    Posts
    1,698

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dogma View Post
    I agree with Parti. Rolling is keeping the coat looking the same AFTER it is staged.

    The dogs coat will eventually get to where 1/3 of the coat needs to be pulled, 1/3 is just where you want it as far as length is concerned plus it will be nearing the phase where it needs to be pulled, and 1/3 will be starting to grow.

    This 1/3 pulling happens on each section of the dog. So you pull down 1/3 of the jacket, the longest hairs, 1/3 of the head, 1/3 of the legs etc. This way you always have fresh new growth coming in.
    That’s why it’s called ‘rolling the coat’.

    You won’t be able to roll a coat forever. Eventually the coat will blow and you’ll need to pull the coat down to its underwear and start over.

    Staging, as Naturally Furry was describing is a technique that eventually gets the dog in the proper look ‘down the road’. This is the part that owners and beginning groomers often don’t understand.
    Dog comes in in a completely blown coat. You will strip the body parts that need to grow the longest first.
    So leg hair is longer then top of the head hair.
    Leg hair and jacket get pulled down.
    Dog goes home with near naked back and shorter leg hair, but head, neck, shoulders, are still long and bushy and in blown coat.
    Wait a week or so, and pull down the next area. Say back of neck.
    Wait another week or so and pull the next area. Say sides of neck.
    Etc Etc Etc
    The ears will be among the last to pull as they will be among the shortest part of the pattern.
    This can take anywhere from 6-12 weeks to finally have a dog that is groomed.
    It is a process for sure and most owner aren’t willing to do that to get their Schnauzer, Fox Terrier, Lakeland to look as they should.
    Some breeds are less tedious and require less staging. Border Terriers come to mind.

    Once you have gone through all that staging you can start rolling the coat.
    ^^^this^^^
    It's not what you look at that matters; it's what you see.
    Henry David Thoreau

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