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  1. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Los Angeles basin
    Posts
    77

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    Naturally how is it going. I have a hard time making a truly straight line. I think it is my biggest weakness.

    Can you use a piece of chalk and draw the line on the dog??????????????????? I can follow that, I am actually a good carpenter hobby and I make straight clean cuts following a pencil or chalk line.

    Why not do the same on a dog????

  2. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    12,039

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wigginz View Post
    Naturally how is it going. I have a hard time making a truly straight line. I think it is my biggest weakness.

    Can you use a piece of chalk and draw the line on the dog??????????????????? I can follow that, I am actually a good carpenter hobby and I make straight clean cuts following a pencil or chalk line.

    Why not do the same on a dog????
    Because the lines should not be straight. They follow the body contours.
    My Blog The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

  3. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Madison, Wisconsin, United States
    Posts
    7,296

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    Can you explain a little further?
    Are you referring to a certain area on each dog or certain breed of dog or trim style?
    Typically our pet trims follow the contour lines of the dog in order to accentuate good features and hide the bad ones. But there is basic geometrics involved for sure, including the principles of angles like you’re referring to with carpentry. If you could explain a little farther maybe we could all help you more.
    Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
    www.ChrisSertzel.com

  4. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Capital Region, NY
    Posts
    1,596

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    Quote Originally Posted by windywaycavaliers View Post
    Can you explain a little further?
    Are you referring to a certain area on each dog or certain breed of dog or trim style?
    Typically our pet trims follow the contour lines of the dog in order to accentuate good features and hide the bad ones. But there is basic geometrics involved for sure, including the principles of angles like you’re referring to with carpentry. If you could explain a little farther maybe we could all help you more.
    I wish I could explain further. All I can say is what my mentor said, your pattern lines need tweaking. How they need tweaking they never elaborated on, so IDK where or what I need to improve about them. :s
    It's not what you look at that matters; it's what you see.
    Henry David Thoreau

  5. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Capital Region, NY
    Posts
    1,596

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    Quote Originally Posted by absolutebichon View Post
    Sure. Doesn't it weird but it works, for me and some others. It helps visualize. I forgot though. We were taught to stand up and do it on a greaseboard. Since we stand for grooming a lot that helps. But later I practiced more sitting at a table with paper and pen.

    Have your blindfold ready. Determine a pattern like Town & Country. Now with marker in hand, without being blindfolded, draw that pattern. Imagine you are looking down on the dog standing at its rear. So do that a few times until you are happy with it. Next phase you put blindfolds on and try the same thing. It takes a lot of practice but I swear after some practice and more practice I got pretty good, and so did my patterns in real time grooming. I was faster for sure. I saw it done already.

    I was told it is like a sculptor seeing a rough block of marble and yet sees the finish product at the same time. Then I find out there are some teachers that have taught children this type of thought and form and some of them draw blindfolded quite amazing.
    I haven't tried this yet, but will. I was actually an art major and most of my friends have their fine arts degree. A dog to me is like a canvas to a painter. They use paintbrushes to achieve a certain look or texture, i use shears or thinners. They only difference is a painter doesn't have to worry about it's canvas jumping off the isle! LOL
    It's not what you look at that matters; it's what you see.
    Henry David Thoreau

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