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  1. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    San Clemente, CA
    Posts
    763

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    It is true that you must be under the supervision of a licensed vet in order to perform non-anesthetic dentals. At my shop I have a team that comes in once a month for a Non-Anesthetic Dental Clinic. It costs $125. The techs perform the cleaning, and the customer receives an exam before and after from the vet and the vet also answers any other health related questions.

    2 years ago I got a nasty letter from the Veterinary Medical Board and I had to prove that I actually had a vet onsite during these clinics. Since providing this information I have never had a problem. We do occasionally have dogs that we have to turn down and send to the regular vet because they are not candidates and need the be put under for teeth extractions, or other problems.

    I am very happy with my clinic. I make a good amount of money that day and my clients have a chance to receive affordable dental care for their pet. I do not think non-anesthetic cleanings should be performed without the supervision of a vet. What if something happens medically, and many times there is a lot of bleeding and the dog does need antibiotics. I'm pretty sure your average person without a veterinary license is not allowed to dispense antibiotics, but the vet can!

  2. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Michigan!!!
    Posts
    1,349

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    Quote Originally Posted by HoundLover View Post
    settergirl sometimes a raw diet JUST dosnt cut it!

    Hound
    I wasn't saying a Raw diet was everything, but it's something in addition to everyday cleaning, tooth gels, brushes, etc that can prevent the need for dentals in many dogs. Just like different brands of kibble, there are also different types of raw diets. Commercially available ground and patties aren't going to have the same effects for the teeth as a home prepared Prey Model Raw diet, which is what I feed.

    There's also the RMB diet which can be a nightmare for teeth if weight bearing bones are chewed on, as well as an at home ground diet, which will have similar results as the commercial has. For teeth that are supposedly horrible, it may suggest a lack of tendons and edible bone in the diet. The amount of each portion needed can also be animal specific. Some dogs (or cats) may need more tendons or edible bones to help with their teeth. They also might be gulpers, not tearing the pieces apart completely before swallowing.

  3. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Surprise,AZ
    Posts
    4,391

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    i feed a course ground chicken WITH bones. the vet was mystified as to why her teeth werent coming clean. its mainly her back teeth which the vet also said seemed to be together i guess when they are supposed to be seperate. they arent rotten just dirty but due to her elevated levels id rather try a non anestetic cleaning versus a regular dental and i cannot afford 800 dollars to have all the testing done plus the cost of the dental itself for ONE cat!

    its just redicolous....im all for feeding prey model if your cats will eat it...unfortunatly mine wont and a chicken head she cannot handle the whole thing. my male is fine with it. and she also wont eat rabbit feet either. (must be the fur LOL). again the male is fine with that as well. she is picky picky and wont even touch dried kibbletype treats (pounce etc).

    i just dont know what to do to help get her back teeth cleaned....when we first had her i also noticed her jaw seemed to get *stuck* and she would need to wiggle it about so i think she has other underlying issues that just havent cropped up yet....figures the free cat ends up costing us the most money lol!

    Hound

  4. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Madison, Wisconsin, United States
    Posts
    1,098

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    Here the low end of dental, with no extraction, is $500. Ella got her's done before we adopted her, and we do plan on having it done every 3 years or so for her, but that does price way too many people out of the market. We feed raw and grain-free kibble, but with a mini poodle, she may have dental issues just from breeding and genetics and I don't want a 10 year old dog eatting canned food with 3 teeth left in her mouth. I've never heard of anyone in this area doing the anethesia free dentals, but if someone were to come around doing it, I'm sure two things would happen: the area vets would throw a hissy and a lot of lower income people would jump at the chance.

  5. #17

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    Everyone would agree that our physical personality can have a bad impact if we have the bad looking yellowish teeth. This is why it is important to follow all the dental care instructions that are suggested to you by the expert. I am extremely happy that I have healthy teeth and I usually visit my Torrance dentist for checkups.

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