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Dilution Ratios - I Did the Math!

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  • Dilution Ratios - I Did the Math!

    By Barbara Bird
    Originally written in 2009 for her GroomWise.com Blog, and now archived here in Resources. Barbara's web site is www.bbird.biz. Please visit her site today.
    Copyright 2011 Barbara Bird All rights reserved

    Figuring out how much shampoo or conditioner to use to obtain the proper dilution ratio can be confusing to some groomers. Being great at math is not in our necessary skill set. Here is an explanation of how to figure it out, and a chart that gives the amounts of product for 32 ounce mixing bottles and one gallon. I hope this is helpful for someone, because as you were out and about having a life last Saturday night, I was sitting here grappling with the math. Who loves ya'?

    PRODUCT DILUTION CONVERSIONS

    Most products come with a suggested dilution ratio expressed as the parts water per one part product. For example 16:1 would be sixteen parts water to one part shampoo. To determine how much shampoo to mix, first convert the size of your container into ounces (32 oz mixing bottle, 128 ounces for a gallon) and then divide by the ratio desired. In a 32 oz bottle, 16:1 would be 32/16 = 2 ounces shampoo. A gallon amount would be 128/16 = 8 ounces product.

    Here are some common dilutions rounded to the nearest ½ ounce.

    DILUTION RATIO OUNCES/32 OZ BOTTLE OUNCES/GALLON

    4:1 8 oz. (1 cup) 32 oz. (4 cups)

    8:1 4 oz. (1/2 cup) 16 oz. (2 cups)

    10:1 3 oz. 12 oz. (3/4 cup)

    12:1 2.5 oz. 10.5 oz

    16:1 2 oz. (1/4 cup) 8 oz. (1 cup)

    24:1 1.5 oz. 5 oz.

    32:1 1 oz. 4 oz. ( 1/2 cup)

    50:1 .5 oz. 2.5 oz.

    84:1 (1/3 oz) 1.5 oz.

    For best performance of products, it is important to measure accurately. Failure to measure is a waste of money and can result in poor performance of some products. To avoid product contamination, mix only what you will use in a day or two. Many groomers use a bartender’s shot glass as a measure for mixing shampoos and conditioners. Remember that the average shot glass is 1.5 ounces. A “pony shot” is typically one ounce.

    Excessively hard water may require a slightly higher ratio of shampoo for best performance. High mineral content can impede cleaning ability of surfactants and can require an adjustment. Increase the concentration in small increments. For example, if you are not getting good cleaning at 12:1, change to a 10:1 mixture.

    Pump type bathing systems that recirculate product can perform under entirely different dilutions. For products offering 10:1 or 12:1 dilution, start with a one ounce of shampoo per 1.5 gallons of water. For products suggesting 32:1 dilution, use only ½ ounce shampoo per 1.5 gallons. Adjust according to your results. With conditioners, start with 1-2 ounces per 1.5 gallons water for light conditioning, up to 4 ounces per 1.5 gallons for maximum softening, detangling or deshedding.

    • violet2
      #8
      violet2 commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by blingwithfur
      My boss at one time didn't know the difference between 20 to 1 or 50 to 1. Our eyes would roll. Sometimes the shampoos were thick as mud, and next time watery as my eyes with an allergy.
      OMG funny. Note to bosses, know your dilution rates.

    • 10muddypaws
      #9
      10muddypaws commented
      Editing a comment
      OH good I needed a new chart.

    • violet2
      #10
      violet2 commented
      Editing a comment
      We laminated ours and I posted by mix area.
    Posting comments is disabled.

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