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Thread: Teeth loss ....

  1. #1
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    Oops Teeth loss ....

    So do any of your own dogs have no teeth? It saddens me to see one of my dogs, who I attribute it to bad breeding lose her teeth. She is only 7 and I don't even want to take her in to the vet because I know he is going to pull so many again. The first time to the vet, they pulled 11 without even consulting me! I'm sure it was probably necessary but it takes her ages to finish her food because of it. Yes I know bad teeth can lead to health problems, but I see it as a quality of life thing also. I'm sure dogs can live with no teeth and eat soft food? I just reel bad for her. Advice? What should I do?

  2. #2
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    Yes, one of my cockers many years ago lost all her teeth. I found that she could eat moistened kibble much easier than canned food. She wasn't able to grab the canned food from her dish, but had no trouble with kibble. The soft food mushed up making it difficult for her. My mom used to tell about my grandpa who had no teeth. His gums hardened up and he could still eat OK. Your dog will be fine. They don't sit around feeling sorry for themselves like we do. Just another lesson they teach us.
    Old groomers never die, they just go at a slower clip.

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  3. #3
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    My doggo is 10 and he's has to have 2 dental, both times he needed extractions. 1st time it was 2 2nd time ir was around 6.

    Usually on admit the vet or the nurses should go through everything with you including the potential of extractions, and if it's like my vet there is certainly an added cost for extractions as it takes longer depending on how easy they are to pull. A reputable vet won't extract teeth unless needed.

    Bad teeth can also lead to a miserable quality if life. One of my clients desperately needs a dental that will most likely result in most of her teeth being extracted. The owner won't do it as she feels the dog is too old. You even think about going near her face and she's ready to rip yours off she's in that much pain poor mite. I have to muzzle her and brush the hair through the muzzle to cut it.

    The thing with teeth is once they are bad they can only get worse. They cannot get better.

  4. #4
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    I recently boarded a regular groom dog. She has no teeth at all. Her dad brought a food processor and canned food.....I had to run it thru food processor and then she would suck it up.....if some got in the outer edge of bowl, I had to scrap it back to middle of the bowl and she ate all of it. I would think soft canned food would be easy to eat but no go, food prosser made it where she ate it every day with no problems.
    Ain't always easy to stand up for what is right.

  5. #5
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    Some humans have the same problem. They may brush after every meal, massage gums, use a Water pick and floss and they still have decay and gums issues. I asked my dentist who also taught at dental school and he said some people and I think dogs have SOFT enamel. It just doesn't last long. They don't re mineralize the enamel.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marshmellow View Post

    Bad teeth can also lead to a miserable quality of life.
    THIS!
    Dogs often don't show they are in pain, but just imagine having toothache, for months and years, in multiple teeth...
    All of my customers who have older dogs and had dental work done, with extractions, mentioned how playful and happy their old dogs are, after the pain is gone.



    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  7. #7
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    Doctors don't like to say it, or don't even know it, but teeth and gum issues even in humans are strongly related to heart problems. The build up of disease in the gums even after a root canal is risky.

    This is why vet med even shows that though rare, teeth decay released by groomers doing teeth brushing can enter enter the blood system and dogs die on the table in minutes.

    Enough said. This info is often suppressed since Seventies.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen View Post
    Doctors don't like to say it, or don't even know it, but teeth and gum issues even in humans are strongly related to heart problems. The build up of disease in the gums even after a root canal is risky.

    This is why vet med even shows that though rare, teeth decay released by groomers doing teeth brushing can enter enter the blood system and dogs die on the table in minutes.

    Enough said. This info is often suppressed since Seventies.
    And a GOOD vet will share info with you and start your pup,on an antibiotic prior to the dental with extractions to give the dog a better chance of avoiding infection.
    Where we see the worse cases are from (mostly) puppy mill dogs who donít naturally loose the baby teeth and the (often clueless) owners think itís no big deal. The last one like those was 6 years old and one of the u sheíd teeth had caused an abscess that burst through the sinus cavity. Heís made it through the surgery, just barely..

  9. #9
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    Our little pup had to loose a fair number of his teeth by 10, and our elderly cat had only 4 by the end. They both did just fine with either wet food, or in the case of the dog, kibble with a bit of warm water over it (He pretty much just swallowed them whole!) In the case of the cat she had an autoimmune disease that would attack her teeth and cause abscesses, and the dog was just a result of being a chi mix. Some dogs are just genetically predisposed to have more weakly-rooted teeth (chinese cresteds are a good example) and many small dogs have problems with decay because their teeth don't scale down right and are overcrowded in their mouths, trapping food and debris. Even if the owner does all the right things, some dogs just don't manage to keep teeth into their senior years.
    As many others have said, though, most dogs do very well with minor adjustments to feeding after loosing teeth, and are much happier once the rotten ones are out. However it is very odd that the vet would pull that many teeth without giving some sort of heads up first. Usually when we did dentals they would tell us what ones looked suspicious before doing the procedure, though I understand that sometimes it's really hard to tell until they scrape away some of the gunk. They usually erred on the side of telling us that one might have to go but have it turn out to be ok.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kurt99 View Post
    So do any of your own dogs have no teeth? It saddens me to see one of my dogs, who I attribute it to bad breeding lose her teeth. She is only 7 and I don't even want to take her in to the vet because I know he is going to pull so many again. The first time to the vet, they pulled 11 without even consulting me! I'm sure it was probably necessary but it takes her ages to finish her food because of it. Yes I know bad teeth can lead to health problems, but I see it as a quality of life thing also. I'm sure dogs can live with no teeth and eat soft food? I just reel bad for her. Advice? What should I do?
    I wanted to add sometimes when the vet tech cleaning teeth, many are so loose they just fall out. So the vet not asking you wouldn't be an option. Take your dog in if she has bad teeth again, she will adjust (and not be in pain every day)
    Ain't always easy to stand up for what is right.

  11. #11
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    I've now had two dogs with no teeth- both pomeranians. With my previous pom it never caused her much difficulty. She still ate solid food until she passed at 17. My new one is a rescue, but same thing. First while after surgery I was cooking her food, but now she's back to eating kibble. At the time of the consult they told me they do try to save the canines, as the root is so long they help stabilize the jaw, but better to not have the infection.

  12. #12
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    I have mainly had issues with very small dog with teeth issues. Seems like a small cavity say on a big dog's tooth is just a cavity percentage of the tooth. But to a tiny tooth on the small dog, a cavity is the size of the tooth. Size matters sometimes.

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