Maisie was conceived in Saint Louis but not born there. She was unexpected and would be born with no brothers or sisters. She would not know love any time except a young mothers love. Her mothers family had emigrated to America from Ireland in the time of the Great Famine, the Irish Potato Famine. Life in America was like natures blight for them. Just as the blight killed roots and tubers of the potato plants, it killed the roots of poor families strangers in a new land. Living in America was like new soil but poor emigrants could not afford the comfort yet challenge of living from the land. Yet there was hope, long periods of waning hope where sharing the suffering kept emigrants together. Years passed finding little else but mill work. Children were born into mill work too. They worked much like adults 12 hours a day, and often more. No schooling. Maisies mother married the man she was told. It was luck and duty. He was rugged and strong, and no less poor. Yet he was spirited and protected his family. His name was Findlay, a Scotsman whose family had likewise emigrated to America in hopes of their dreams. In their circles children were were born to work in the factories, a sad intent in those days. The story of these peoples are long forgotten now. What little they earned kept morsels of hope going that things would get better. Life was gray.

Maise was the third generation. Her father died in a riot at the mill. Mother was a seamstress and good fortune led her to an Irish family of merchants moving to St. Louis. She had no children but skills with needle and thread learned from her grandmother. With a family of eight to care for she bundled her belongings to care for the family on its move to Saint Louis. There she worked hard but was treated well. She learned the values of being merchants, working for ones self.

Then providence spoke to her, she was to care for their family dogs too.