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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    1,775

    Oops Groomer refuses to groom dog with alopecia

    We had a new customer yesterday. The dog is a real mix but shows double coated breeds. It already has an alopecia moderately bad. I mentioned it right away and the customer seemed pleased I recognized. Seems the symptoms started when the dog was about 1 and is now 3. She moved to this area and tried another groomer a couple days ago. All she wants is the coat to be taken short not stripped all over. Maybe 1/2 inch all over to make the condition less evident. The groomer refused saying she doesn't groom dogs with this condition.

    Can anyone figure out why? The customer is aware of the condition and will sign a waiver. The groomer cannot be blamed for a prior existing condition.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    4,316

    Default

    Not to groomer bash, but it sounds like perhaps the groomer doesn't know what it is?? I feel like that's why I'm here.. to see conditions, help the owners understand what can or cannot be done, guide them to the vet or whatever. Then bathe the dog, groom it up and make it feel better.

    I have groomed dogs with mange (demodex), had a dog with demodex (bathed him) and caught Scabies myself from it all. It took me a long road to recover, but now that I have a treatment for myself, I figure my job is to help people, if they are willing to be helped lol, get rid of the problem.

    As for the groomer....???????
    Debbie
    There's always room for another rose in the garden.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    1,652

    Default

    Well yes I agree. You know that thread last month about ninja warrior on tv. There is guy on it that has that all his life, all his body. SO shaving didn't start it, he is bald every square inch of his ninja body girls. Well I don't know what's under the shorts, but that's not the point. It is genetic most likely. This wonderful guy inspires kids with alopecia across America getting on TV and competing and even has a gym for them and inspires everyone to do what you want to do alopecia or not. A hero really. So back to grooming, that proves to me it is not quite all from grooming alone but sure grooming could stimulate it? Dunno. Grooming sure would indicate it has kicked in if you shave existing coat down. But I am not going to catch cooties. This customer's request is great. Just help me keep it less evident. I would love to help this pet owner.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Greenville, SC, originally Hamilton, NJ
    Posts
    888

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by absolutebichon View Post
    The customer is aware of the condition and will sign a waiver. The groomer cannot be blamed for a prior existing condition.
    Being held financial liable and being "blamed" on social media are different things. Perhaps this groomer has had a negative experience with a client where they were blamed for a condition, even though it had already presented itself before the visit. Even with a waiver, I would take detailed before/after pictures just in case.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    604

    Default

    I think it is a good idea to take pictures, even ask if their vet diagnosed it as such and get the vet's name. I ask all my customers for their vet's name. I know some groomers don't, but that's a separate topic.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    579

    Default

    Pictures are a good idea. I groom 2 actually. No problems. I know the vet now and let them know I was grooming them.

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