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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    654

    Default Any tips for hand scissoring a poodle x bichon?

    I've a new client booked for tomorrow. The owners father has been trying to get her to use me for the best part if the year and she's finally booked in . the kicker is , she only wants the dog hand scissored. Entirely. No clippers to touch the dog, not even the pads or groin .sigh.

    I have not seen the dog , and I've no idea what the coat condition or texture is like and trying to get that info was like blood from a stone. All I got was : its fluffy.

    Any tips ?

    I'm dreading the worse case scenario of the dog being matted and having to scalp the dog. That will not be a fun chat !

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    368

    Default

    Oh dear-she sounds high maintenance right off the bat. Too bad that she is a referral, but...a client just said to me "You're the expert..." . And that's what you are, Marshmellow. Stick to your own convictions on it. If you feel it would be unsafe, tell the owner. Are you able to refuse a groom? Or conversely, would one of the vets be available to talk to her? Maybe she is just truly concerned for the integrity of her pet's coat.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    654

    Default

    I'm not afraid to stick to my guns and tell her to go else where if she isn't happy with my assessment of the dogs coat ! (Politely of course)

    She really does sound high maintenance. I've done "poochons" before but they were all guard comb teddy trims but they had soft dense almost drop coat texture with a loose curl to it . ah well , let's see what shows up tomorrow! As the saying goes , hope for the best but expect the worst ! I'll try and remember to take pictures!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,261

    Default

    Marshmellow. You will do fine. You have handscissored heads before—same thing only on the body.
    Back in the olden days it was the only way we did it. I LOVE the SS clip-on combs. What a game changer. But you’ll be fine. Give it a try.

    The other thing that I’ve learned is that you can do as the owner asks and then, once they are regulars, start doing your normal routine.
    So I would hand scissor the belly and pads for the first few times. Then I would start using a 5 on the belly. Further down the line a 7 on the belly. Same with pads. A 10, then a 15, etc.
    Chances are the dog probably reacts to a blade in those areas. I have a Scottie that will lick her pads if I use anything shorter then a 10. Same with her belly. Anything shorter then a 5 and she licks herself. She is NOT a fan of a Brazilian! Grin!!

    I also do the same on body coat. I’ll start using a clip-on on the front and sides of the neck and the top of the rump. Then I’ll add in
    down the shoulders, etc etc.
    These are areas that are shorter then the trunk part of the body. You just sneak in the Clip-on and blend into the body coat from there. The owner will never know the difference. You will eventually be able to use different lengths of clip-one on the entire body.

    After a few grooms the owner has started to trust you and will stop checking the dog with a fine toothed comb to make sure “you did it right”. That’s when you start slipping in your time saving methods.
    The owners will love you and tell all their friends about you because “your the only groomer that does it just like I told them to”.

    Post pictures. Oh, and make sure you “Over Fluff”! Grin!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    654

    Default

    Thanks for the reassurance, I lack confidence in a full hand scissor as I've only done a handful of scissor dogs. And of course , ill remember to over fluff! Its a purebred mixed breed after all!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    SE Wash St
    Posts
    4,102

    Default

    Like dogma, I used to do a lot of hand scissor trims...'back in the day'. I would be curious to know WHY she doesn't want clippers used. Did she get a bad cut or burn somewhere? I find many owners think 'clippers' only come in one length-shaved short. She may just need some education on what can be achieved using clippers. Don't forget to charge accordingly for an all over scissor trim! You'll do great!
    Old groomers never die, they just go at a slower clip.

    Groom on!!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Everywhere
    Posts
    9,830

    Default

    Agree with Karla and Dogma for the tips on doing this dog. However I wanted to add an experence I had with a dog about 15 yrs ago. It was a white schnauzer.......this dog had been to every grooming salon in town, seems they all "clipper burned" her. So I did a 4f on back and santi, 10 on pads, scissored the furshings. The only area of this dog that did not irritate was the hand scissored furshings. After much discussion with owner, vets and myself, we discovered this dog had a reaction to metal touching her body. She was a hand scissored only dog after that.....done with a plastic comb and wooden pinned brush......and not in a schnauzer groom, more a teddy clip.
    Ain't always easy to stand up for what is right.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    654

    Default Well this just got sticky.....

    It was the owners dad who dropped the dog off... With pictures of either dogs with a straight drop coats, or tight curls on dogs due for grooming ( including one that looked matted )

    The dad had no clue as to style or length or anything its a complaint waiting to happen ... Daughter is in hospital critically ill .

    Did I mention he looks really choppy?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,261

    Default

    Oh Cyn, that is Crazy! I’ve never heard that before. How fortunate the problem was discovered and you could help with a solution.

    Marshmellow. So how did it go? Did you take pictures? Did he look choppy before you got him, like the owners had been chopping on him? I’m unsure from your last post if the dog they brought in had a straight coat or poodle type coat.

    Either way, I bet the dog looked a hundred times better once you were finished.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    654

    Default

    Yeah, it went OK I think?

    He was very poodly, if I wasn't told he was a cross I'd have said he was a stocky poodle. His coat was great to scissor, he just kept trying to sit on lie down.

    The owner had sent her dad pictures of poodle crosses that were different coat types, or they were ready for a groom and of different coat lengths too.

    I've no idea of the owners reaction .... But her dad seemed pleased. I got a before , after bath and after groom pictures and I'll post them tonight as I can't resize them on my phone.

    Cyn, I'm like that pup with jewelry, anything besides 925 silver or 18kt+ gold and I react to it , to the point the areas look almost burnt so I can imagine how the poor mite feels !

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    654

    Default

    And yeah, he looked choppy before I started him, but I don't know if it was a diy attempt or bad grooming.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    3,432

    Default

    It might just be that owner thinks the only way to do long hair cut is scissor versus " shave" or something odd like that.
    I suggest you show her how we use guard combs to bulk in our pattern then scissor finish. Plus hand scissor entire dog is more moolah.
    Some of my best coats were poodle Bichon mix so I hope you get that!

    Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk

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