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Thread: Cat nick

  1. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    4,362

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    Quote Originally Posted by Emma123 View Post
    Well, the tail of woe continues.
    The good news is that kitty just needed a little gluing at the veterinary office.
    I met the client at the vet office, sat in the exam room with her, and went back to the owner's home to complete the groom.
    I nicked the cat again!!!! This time, the nick was worse, being situated on the neck and deeper than the first nick.
    I felt so sick when I saw what I'd done that I needed to sit down. I felt like I was going to throw up. I still don't know how I could have done this.
    I took the kitty to the vet for stitches, light sedation and an antibiotic shot. The owner stayed home because she had work to do.
    When the kitty was ready to be taken home, I tried to pay the $500 bill. The owner had secretly asked the vet not to accept my money. She said I would try to pay, but that they should not let me pay. In fact, the owner still wanted to pay me for my time.
    Some people have a beautiful, forgiving spirit.
    Oh Emma.. I'm so sorry. I know your heart is sick. What a wonderful owner... seriously exactly as you said.. a beautiful, forgiving spirit. Okay, so I have a confession.. and I know I've told this story before.. but I used to cut hair. Then I got married and became a stay at home mom. But I still cut hair here and there and my boys hair. Well, one time, my oldest son, I think he was 11 or 12, and I was cutting around his ear, when I cut a BIG chunk off the top of his ear!!! Like he's 38 and still has a scar??? It wasn't the tip, but on the side closest to his head. OMG... it was terrible!!! I started laughing too!!! Even worse!! My son was like.. "MOM!!!! Did you just cut my ear???" (thankfully not a lot of nerves there). I cut his hair for the next 10 years I think, but when I got to his ears.. he became mighty protective of them!

    I hope you feel okay. You are a fantastic cat groomer!!! <3
    Debbie
    There's always room for another rose in the garden.

  2. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    867

    Nerdy

    Emma,

    I did not know you were using the Bravura to do the cat. Thats a scary blade to use on a cat because thee is no bottom blade or chamfering to it. I think you tried to dig under that mat and lifted the handle up too much and thats when the blade sucked it in.

    Next time, put the smallest comb (1/16th inch) on the 5-N-1 blade, it cuts like a 10 blade. That will keep the blade off the skin and prevent this from happening. Always go with the grain so if you do hit a mat you wont raise the skin in front of the mat and force it into the blade. I tried to use my Chromado one time on a cat and seen it was a scary situation, I worried about poking a hole in the skin not nicking it. The front of the 5-N-1 blade can become surgically sharp with only one re-sharpening, so run your finger lightly across the teeth then and make sure it isnt sharp to the touch.

    Im sure you have the comb set made for the 5-N-1 blades, so just slip the smallest comb on and you'll be good. I guarantee you wont cut a cat again keeping the blade raised off the skin. And even if you raise the back of the clipper to get under a mat, the comb will prevent the teeth from digging into the skin like it did.

    You'll be fine, just use the comb next time.

    -------------------------------------------
    Jeff Andrews
    Northern Tails Sharpening, Inc
    2319 Granada Ave
    Mobile, Alabama 36693
    251-232-5353
    www.northerntails.com
    jeff@northerntails.com
    "You NOW Have A Better Choice"

  3. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Humboldt
    Posts
    2,127

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    Quote Originally Posted by northerntailssharpening View Post
    When I was doing cats it was a nightmare, every cat is different even if its the same breed.

    A Few things I watch for when I know the blade is to be used on cats.

    1. 10's and 7F's only. Never use anything lower than a 10. WHY? because cat skin is very thin and has fatty deposits in it, especially if its a house cat thats laying around all the time. I can feel the deposits in my own cats skin and he is a little lazy a$$. Anything lower and you could cut the skin very easy by putting a tiny nick in it. #30's, #15's and #40's and #50's are not chamfered on the tips of the teeth, they can become as sharp as a scalpel if the sharpener doesnt dull them afterwards. Chamfering is that little ramp you see on the front of your #10 and larger blades.

    Also, what alot of sharpeners dont understand is the front of the blade can get very sharp, you can actually cut paper by swiping the tips of the blade across it. I feel the tips with my finger, if it pricks my fingers at all, I run the tips back and forth across a diamond pad. you can do the same on smooth concrete.

    Always pull the skin taught with your thumb ahead of the clipper. Use the thumb on your left hand to pull the skin, and move the clipper very slow across the body right behind your thumb. Be aware that you dont want the the back of the clipper to raise, keep it flat as possible. If you raise the rear of the clipper at all, it can make the blade dig, and it can dig into the skin. So keep focused when shaving a cat. If the cat is restless, get some help to hold it because thats when you can nick it when its moving around and you only have one hand on them.

    2. Set back of the top cutter blade. I usually set the cutter back about double than normal set back. I do this because of past bad experiences. First, it lets the blade dig better in that fluffy type coat. When its set normal, it can just fan the hair away and it will just skim the coat. Secondly, if the cutter is set too close, and the blade heats up fast because of the fluffy coat, the cutter may move forward enough where the teeth are across the bottom blade. Then your cutting skin. Cat hair heats up a blade very fast and melts at a very low temperature. Thats why your cat blades have brown or black looking burnt stuff on the cutting surfaces. Never use coolant on a cat blade. WHY? Because real cat groomers know that sometimes grooming a cat can irritate the skin because its sensitive. Coolant is nothing more than rubbing alcohol and propane gas. Since rubbing alcohol is poisonous, it can irritate the skin very badly if its the least bit irritated or nicked. Since grooming cats heats up the blades so much, what can be used to keep it cool? Use Canned Air from Walmart. Turn the can upside down and spray the back of the blade for 1/2 second. This will cool the metal all the way through the blade, you could even see ice form on the back. Oil it again and continue with the groom.

    3. increase the tension of the blade to the top of the tension spec. Tension of a blade is really important to a blade your going to groom a cat with. Have you ever when to groom a cat and you had to try several blades befor you found one that would cut this cats fur???? Tension is whats causing this problem. The blade will work fine on a dog, but cat fur it will just jam in. By increasing the tension and stabilizing it at the top end of the spec, it will keep the cat hair from getting between the cutter and comb of the blade when the blade heats up, thats whats causing the jamming.

    Now, if your checking the tips of your blade to make sure the teeth arent sharp on the tips, and you making sure your holding the clipper and keeping that blade as flat as possible on the skin, and your also pulling that akin ahead of the blade with your thumb to make sure its taught with NO ripples, you nshouldn't cut or nick a cat then. And if the cat is a jiggler and your alone, dont do the groom, get some help, because thats when you'll nick or cut a cat is when he moves one way and you move the other. The money aint worth it if you have to pay to get the cat stitched up.

    This is all I can think of when it comes to blades and cat grooming. I learned all this one scar at a time for over 20 years. We do have some very educational videos, and published articles on equipment care if you would like to read some. May help you with situations like this down the road. Remember your clipper has to be 100% when you do a cat along with a sharp blade.

    Hope this helped you. Any questions you can call me and we can talk about our scars from cats together.

    -------------------------------------------
    Jeff Andrews
    Northern Tails Sharpening, Inc
    2319 Granada Ave
    Mobile, Alabama 36693
    251-232-5353
    www.northerntails.com
    jeff@northerntails.com
    "You NOW Have A Better Choice"
    Great answer jeff.

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