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  1. #1
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    Animated Wink New York Groomer Licensing Legislation Formally Introduced in New York

    http://legislativegazette.com/follow...o-be-licensed/

    Following multiple incidents of pets dying during their grooming sessions, Sen. Tony Avella, D-Queens, has introduced legislation (S.1569-a) that would require licensing and other regulations for pet groomers in New York.

    The legislation, which is co sponsored by Sens. Phil Boyle, R-Bay Shore, and José Serrano, D-Bronx, would regulate pet groomers — both businesses and individual groomers, require all groomers to be registered and inspected, would set health and safety standards for housing of animals and create a set of penalties for violations.

    Bill S.1569-a defines grooming as “any act of preparing, cleaning, trimming, or styling animal hair by an individual for financial remuneration.” Right now, a New York dog groomer is currently not required, by law, to take any formal education or training classes. New Jersey and Connecticut already have laws put into place regulating the licensure of groomers and grooming facilities in their states.

    Under the legislation, people who wish to register as a groomer in New York state must be at least 18 years of age, pass a background check, have never been convicted of animal cruelty or neglect and have no outstanding judgement for child support against him or her. Businesses must pay an initial registration application fee of $50 and must be re-filed biennially for a fee of $100.

    The legislation’s health and safety standards include:

    Providing temporary housing, bathing areas and grooming tables that are in good repair, safe, secure and stable.
    All facilities must be clean, neat, orderly work spaces cleaning between uses by different pets.
    Equipment, tools and products used by business must be in good working condition.
    Facilities must have appropriate ventilation and first aid kits available for pets and personnel and fresh water available for pets confined more than four hours.
    Facilities used by pet grooming businesses must have emergency procedures to assure the health and safety of pets in event of an emergency.
    Businesses that violate any part of the legislation would face a fine of at least $500 per violation. Violations that do not include safety issues will range between fines of $50 to $100.

    Americans spent $5.4 billion on pet boarding and grooming services this year, according to the American Pet Products Manufacturers Association. And unfortunately, some of the groomers we are trusting with our beloved pets are being too careless. There have been multiple incidents in the past decade due to neglect by groomers resulting in permanent injuries and sometimes even death.

    In 2012, a groomer in Ithaca, claims to have experienced a hypoglycemic episode during a grooming session and blacked out. The result was two dead beagles found in a mobile grooming van. Presumptive causes of death included strangulations, electrocution, carbon monoxide poisoning and drowning. Veterinarians state that it was completely avoidable.

    In 2015, an English bulldog, Bella, required a three-week regimen of antibiotics and medicated baths because of an infection associated with burn wounds following a grooming visit in Thornwood, Westchester County.

    Earlier this month, a New Jersey man took his two dogs to PetSmart for a routine grooming visit and got a crude phone call shortly after to state that his one corgi, Abby, had become unresponsive and died. Abby had visited her veterinarian a few weeks earlier and was given a clean bill of health.

    This was the fourth reported death of a dog brought in for routine grooming at a Pet Smart store in New Jersey in recent months.

    “The most recent news story of Abby the Corgi dying during a grooming session is further proof of why this legislation is needed,” Avella said. “When we drop our pets off for grooming we expect they will return to us even better than the way we left them. For many of us, our pets are parts of our family and losing them is like losing a loved one.

    “Our state needs to step up to prevent similar tragedies from happening again,” said Senator Avella. “It should be the goal of every pet groomer to treat all animals entrusted to their care with kindness, patience, respect and compassion, ensuring their safety, health, and wellbeing.”

    The bill currently resides in the Consumer Protection Committee and would take effect six months after being signed into law. There is no Assembly version of the bill.
    Coordinators post updates to the message for grooming events, members contests, PG.com Classified Ads, GroomerTALK Radio shows and PG.com Magazine online.

  2. #2
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    I think someone said here recently they thought this was it and licensing is actually probably going to happen in NJ or regulation, and I agree. This is NY. Now I think it is almost certain for both. Just a woman's intuition on this one. I feel it.

  3. #3
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    Seems like a key part of NY is the registration of groomers. The good thing about that is for employers. At least in your own state where they are registered you would have some assistance with background checks. We shall see.

  4. #4
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    I do background checks on the doctors I use. You can call the licensing board and get some help.

  5. #5
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    I think this is VERY likely to pass this time. Why? Apparently states have started and stopped legislation over the years. Now there is very strong criticism of NY and NJ legislators for having done this in the past. I think it is going to take a lot to try to get them to drop it.

  6. #6
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    Well judging from an article it sounds a lot like formal vocational licensing, or is it "quasi?" It sounds more like a registration system on one hand, but like someone as always, is at least honest and saying they don't know what formal education is required. We all know hairstylists for humans have so many hours required. Hmm. Are they going there? Hard to say. But then again we don't have many hairstylists beating, shaking, slapping other people. Yet we do with groomers and we can all imagine why, smart people around here.

    I am glad someone brought up a very important point. Several states have started to license or "regulate" grooming and dropped it. Now that more and more media attention is being given to grooming negative news stories, and that has LOTS to do with social media, I think the legislators are indeed under extreme pressure. If I were a betting person, the old saying, I would say this time is it. I have seen a significant backlash at legislators being told, right or wrong indeed, that had they done something before this wouldn't be such a problem now. That is really hard when you "work for the people." I don't think this is going to go away in NY or NJ.

  7. #7
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    Unfortunately another dog died yesterday at Petsmart in Florida and is making big news on the East Coast. It was not from abuse.

  8. #8
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    And here is a counterpoint to the Batemans Law advocates in New Jersey so we sell all sides here. http://nj1015.com/nj-wants-another-j...-license-fees/

  9. #9
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    So this is the NY moves on groomers. I find it interesting that the New York Post is now looking for and publishing grooming incidents with groomers even a 1,000 miles from New York.

  10. #10
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    Sep 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen View Post
    And here is a counterpoint to the Batemans Law advocates in New Jersey so we sell all sides here. http://nj1015.com/nj-wants-another-j...-license-fees/
    Does it really say you must be of good moral character? So like if I have an affair I'm more likely to allow a dog to hang to death? Who knew?

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