Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    4,679

    Default I learned new reasons to bathe cats. Tooth decay. Smell drives cats apart.

    A new client called me in to bathe smelly cats. Their guess was that the cats were smelly because they went into the garden, or because the litter box wasn't kept clean for two days.
    One cat smelled especially bad, but the fur was spotless.
    While I was bathing the cat, the client told me the cat needed dental work and is scheduled for next week.
    She hadn't put that fact together with smelly coat, which is understandable since she was focused on litter box as a reason.
    Cat licks coat, cleaning herself. Due to tooth decay, saliva smells bad.
    Client asked me to brush teeth, but in this case no point doing that since cat will continue to lick herself. Only solution is dental work.

    Other surprise reason for bathing.
    A cat smelled bad due to having temporary urinary issue. Other house hold cat upset by this. Won't cuddle with her buddy anymore.
    After bath, cats resume cuddling.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Everywhere
    Posts
    9,126

    Default

    Stink will drive any thing apart, lol. But I do find with dogs, a much needed dental is usually the reason clients complain that their dog always stinks, except the day they are groomed. That is because as you said they lick themselves with stinky saliva. Unfortunately most don't have the 900.00 bucks for a dental on their dogs, vets should be ashamed for charging this much for a dental.
    Last edited by Cyn; 02-13-18 at 03:23 PM.
    Ain't always easy to stand up for what is right.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Western Washington
    Posts
    1,537

    Default

    My vet does a great job for about $400 but I know friends in the city pay closer to $1000.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Washington state
    Posts
    1,312

    Default

    I got rid of 99.9% of tartar buildup on my teeth using Neem LEAF Extract, not neem OIL which is for external uses in most preparations. My hygienist was floored when she saw my teeth on the next visit. Right after my last cleaning I started 1) brushing at night, 2) then I put several drops on my teeth as I went to bed and just left it on all night. All night the extract prevents tartar buildup.

    Well I got a little spray bottle and mixed 50 50 water and neem leaf extract and I starting spraying my dogs teeth at bedtime as well. Same thing happened with the vet. First time ever none of the dogs needed cleaning after a year. That saved about $1200. http://www.discoverneem.com/neem-oil-for-cats.html and it seems this would be safe for cats.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Humboldt
    Posts
    1,841

    Default

    It makes sense Emma. I am going to try that leaf extract. I checked some google results and read it works well.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    1,585

    Default

    If my other half stunk like that, no cuddling either. Smart cats.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    131

    Default

    I work with many cats each week. With every cat I handle for the first time, within the first minute, I draw each forefinger along the sides of the jaws, from the muzzle to the back, applying some pressure. I do this two or three times. Dont have to press very hard. I do this to rub all teeth and gums; I'm observing for the slightest flinch. While hardly a definitive test, a flinch/reaction does reveal inflamed or sore gums orsore teeth frequently , which the owner or others at the shelter may have missed. Sometimes gums or teeth look fine and healthy, but one spot is tender, hurting, and this touch pressure test reveals same. This is something to also consider checking when a kitty goes off his feed. Perhaps it hurts to eat, especially dry food, but soft food also.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    4,679

    Default

    What a useful thing to do.Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by nothingbutcats View Post
    I work with many cats each week. With every cat I handle for the first time, within the first minute, I draw each forefinger along the sides of the jaws, from the muzzle to the back, applying some pressure. I do this two or three times. Dont have to press very hard. I do this to rub all teeth and gums; I'm observing for the slightest flinch. While hardly a definitive test, a flinch/reaction does reveal inflamed or sore gums orsore teeth frequently , which the owner or others at the shelter may have missed. Sometimes gums or teeth look fine and healthy, but one spot is tender, hurting, and this touch pressure test reveals same. This is something to also consider checking when a kitty goes off his feed. Perhaps it hurts to eat, especially dry food, but soft food also.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •