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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    21

    Default Housecall Golden with Seizure History?

    My aunt has an employee who wants me to groom her senior golden cross, heís been groomed all his life but a few years or so ago his regular groomer said she could no longer groom him since he had a seizure (corporate policy I assume) His owner has tried grooming him at a vet and a mobile and heís seized every time, I guess they never told her when it happens, but I have a hunch itís from the dryer. She said shes fine if I cant bathe him, I dont own a dryer, she just wants him clipped down so heís easier to maintain for them since theyíve always bathed him at home between grooms. I have no experience with housecalls and donít personally know anyone who does so Iím just wondering what to expect. I have done a few dogs with seizure history but thankfully none have seized on me yet, Iíve watched a few videos about what to expect from a seizure and the whole family will be there in case something does happen. So my question is, how does the housecall process work? Especially with a big dog? How much do you typically charge for a housecall?


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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    275

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by inca View Post
    My aunt has an employee who wants me to groom her senior golden cross, heís been groomed all his life but a few years or so ago his regular groomer said she could no longer groom him since he had a seizure (corporate policy I assume) His owner has tried grooming him at a vet and a mobile and heís seized every time, I guess they never told her when it happens, but I have a hunch itís from the dryer. She said shes fine if I cant bathe him, I dont own a dryer, she just wants him clipped down so heís easier to maintain for them since theyíve always bathed him at home between grooms. I have no experience with housecalls and donít personally know anyone who does so Iím just wondering what to expect. I have done a few dogs with seizure history but thankfully none have seized on me yet, Iíve watched a few videos about what to expect from a seizure and the whole family will be there in case something does happen. So my question is, how does the housecall process work? Especially with a big dog? How much do you typically charge for a housecall?


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    Hi Inca,

    I'm curious if this appointment happened and if so, how it went?
    We've had this happen in the past a few times with no noticeable reason as to what causes the seizures, but when this happens we offer to skip the bath and dry, do a haircut while the owner waits and explain to them we do "as good as we can get" until the dog has shown some stability. Most (actually, all) of our owners in these cases have been MORE than cooperative accepting a groom that isn't as good as one that includes a bath and hand dry. (Actually, long standing clients in particular seem super grateful for our willingness to take on special needs. Those that aren't long standing, we talk with....see below...) We haven't done house calls yet, but when this idiopathic seizures are a problem, we usually schedule those dogs at the very end of the day, after all the other dogs are gone, traffic is done, and the groom will be quick and quiet.
    I'm curious if this dog has a history of seizures in the past not related to grooming. Most of ours have been epileptic, a handful have not.
    We just had this happen a few weeks ago. A decades long client with a very good little dog came in and the dog had a seizure upon walking inside the door. They visited the vet, I talked with the owner later that day and we all decided to do the bath-less groom on a day that there were no other dogs around and as little stress as possible. (This dog is dog and people friendly, but sometimes "stress" can be "good stress" or excitement.) We groomed the dog with a very light sedation (the dog was still able to stand and wasn't drugged) and there were NO issues. The owners waited with her.
    I normally don't love it when owners wait in the room due to the heavy distraction load, but in the case of seizure prone dogs (especially older dogs), I prefer it as sometimes (especially with older pets) that separation seems to trigger problems, and on a completely selfish note, if the dog DOES have a seizure the owners can see that nothing "bad" was done to the dog to "cause" it. In a social media frenzied world where people are happy to bash dog professionals, this can be a good move, IMO.
    In the case of owners, it PAYS so much to develop a rapport with them and take time to talk with them so they feel comfortable with you; as the owner of a dog who developed seizures later in life, I can say it means so much to know whomever is handling that type of dog is dedicated to getting the job done quickly and with little excitement as possible. For the dog I groomed recently, it was more a case of getting the poor owner through it. She had tears in her eyes the whole time. She knew my dog who developed seizures in the past and loved him almost as much as I did! We talked about him a lot. We talked about her dog as we worked on her, and chatted about other things. I think if owner and groomer are calm and laid back and happily quiet, it does a lot to help the dog. It sounds really stupid but this has been a gateway for some of those owners I've known for years but never really "connected with" on a personal level. When their dogs reach a certain age or they develop certain problems and we work hard to devise a plan to make everyone happy, a bond forms. It's hard to explain, but it's special.
    I hope, if this appointment happened, things went well. I didn't see this post until now, and having had a dog with seizures I feel for them and I understand how stressful that is.
    Blessings to you Inca! =)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    21

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Torrance View Post
    Hi Inca,

    I'm curious if this appointment happened and if so, how it went?
    We've had this happen in the past a few times with no noticeable reason as to what causes the seizures, but when this happens we offer to skip the bath and dry, do a haircut while the owner waits and explain to them we do "as good as we can get" until the dog has shown some stability. Most (actually, all) of our owners in these cases have been MORE than cooperative accepting a groom that isn't as good as one that includes a bath and hand dry. (Actually, long standing clients in particular seem super grateful for our willingness to take on special needs. Those that aren't long standing, we talk with....see below...) We haven't done house calls yet, but when this idiopathic seizures are a problem, we usually schedule those dogs at the very end of the day, after all the other dogs are gone, traffic is done, and the groom will be quick and quiet.
    I'm curious if this dog has a history of seizures in the past not related to grooming. Most of ours have been epileptic, a handful have not.
    We just had this happen a few weeks ago. A decades long client with a very good little dog came in and the dog had a seizure upon walking inside the door. They visited the vet, I talked with the owner later that day and we all decided to do the bath-less groom on a day that there were no other dogs around and as little stress as possible. (This dog is dog and people friendly, but sometimes "stress" can be "good stress" or excitement.) We groomed the dog with a very light sedation (the dog was still able to stand and wasn't drugged) and there were NO issues. The owners waited with her.
    I normally don't love it when owners wait in the room due to the heavy distraction load, but in the case of seizure prone dogs (especially older dogs), I prefer it as sometimes (especially with older pets) that separation seems to trigger problems, and on a completely selfish note, if the dog DOES have a seizure the owners can see that nothing "bad" was done to the dog to "cause" it. In a social media frenzied world where people are happy to bash dog professionals, this can be a good move, IMO.
    In the case of owners, it PAYS so much to develop a rapport with them and take time to talk with them so they feel comfortable with you; as the owner of a dog who developed seizures later in life, I can say it means so much to know whomever is handling that type of dog is dedicated to getting the job done quickly and with little excitement as possible. For the dog I groomed recently, it was more a case of getting the poor owner through it. She had tears in her eyes the whole time. She knew my dog who developed seizures in the past and loved him almost as much as I did! We talked about him a lot. We talked about her dog as we worked on her, and chatted about other things. I think if owner and groomer are calm and laid back and happily quiet, it does a lot to help the dog. It sounds really stupid but this has been a gateway for some of those owners I've known for years but never really "connected with" on a personal level. When their dogs reach a certain age or they develop certain problems and we work hard to devise a plan to make everyone happy, a bond forms. It's hard to explain, but it's special.
    I hope, if this appointment happened, things went well. I didn't see this post until now, and having had a dog with seizures I feel for them and I understand how stressful that is.
    Blessings to you Inca! =)
    Hey Torrance, this actually just happened today! It went pretty well, we gave the dog plenty of breaks letting him go at his own pace. He started to get a bit uncooperative a few times but a couple of stern but gentle ĎNoís helped. The family was really nice and understanding, I decided not to lift any of his legs due to hip dysplasia so they understood I couldnít get into his armpits or groin area too well and we left his pads as well. The daughter was more stressed out than the dog haha. They told me his seizures usually happen right before so I think part of it is the anticipation. I warned them he may seize next time now that he knows who I am and what Im doing to him. I also told them we may end up doing a lion clip next time if he is acting up more so its less for him to go through but they still donít have as much hair to deal with. It took a while to do but now that I know him a bit I think it will be faster next time.


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