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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    4,463

    Default Holistic or non-holistic.

    I can see the value in describing a grooming style or service as being holistic. I think most people intuitively understand what that means.
    I don't think it applies to my grooming style, partly because I rarely discuss food or behavior during grooming sessions. Also, I favor some cat foods and products that are definitely not organic or natural.
    Is there a reason you do or don't call your service holistic?

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Emma123 View Post
    I can see the value in describing a grooming style or service as being holistic. I think most people intuitively understand what that means.
    I don't think it applies to my grooming style, partly because I rarely discuss food or behavior during grooming sessions. Also, I favor some cat foods and products that are definitely not organic or natural.
    Is there a reason you do or don't call your service holistic?
    In a nutshell, yes and no.
    I don't call or advertise our place as holistic, because (even though I'm a huge, huge believer in holistic care for all things living) holistic has IMO become an over-used buzzword synonymous with organic and natural, etc. I think in some people it conjures up an image of a Magic Groomer that can fix their dogs problems and magically turn their land shark into a docile lap pet, and in others it conjures up an image of a whack job that uses voodoo and fairy dust. My views of holistic anything is taking the whole being into consideration and developing a plan of action, with no two plans being exactly alike. My views don't match the views of many others, so for this reason we don't advertise as holistic anything.
    With that stated, secretly I feel we kind of are, and a lot of groomers are without realizing it. Give an experienced groomer a 4 month old bratty puppy vs. a 4 month old terrified puppy and a good groomer will adjust their handling styles accordingly to bring out success and the best in the pup, and build from there. A lot of groomers will recommend a hyperactive dog maybe would benefit from eating something besides Beneful and will suggest a better quality and affordable brand of food. I raw feed, but barely recommend it only because a lot of people get really confused and end up cutting corners and feeding meat only, or too much bone or no organs or offal and skip any supplementation necessary for a limited diet if sourcing variety is a problem. (I've had a few customers who were serious enough about their dogs that I suggested they research on their own; a few of them decided to bite on it and have been happy raw feeders for years. Others found a happy medium in a good, high quality kibble with "extras" in the way of canned food, real food, dehydrated or freeze dried, etc.) Also, a lot of groomers have products and suggestions for dogs suffering from skin problems, coat problems, ear infections, etc. and realize dry skin isn't the same as a skin infection isn't the same as a yeast problem, etc. and advise a trip to the vet for a serious problem they detect. We might advise changing up a breed specific trim to suit their dogs' conformation and hide their flaws (a roach backed dog looks much nicer with a scissored topline than clipped, a crooked legged dog looks better with scissored legs vs. clippered, and a dog with a good structure can pull most anything off!) Telling a client that has a rapidly aging dog that's had a full hand scissor trim their entire lives that now might be the time to consider comfort grooms over brushing, combing and asking the dog to stand IMO gets the Holistic Seal of Approval as well. Case by case, dog by dog, and working with the owner to find a plan to suit everyone.
    JMO

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    375

    Default

    If I did I would want to spend MUCH more time with each owner on total care of their pet outside of vet care. I work fast paced but not rushing but don't have the time for more customer interactions.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    2,942

    Default

    I don't use the term either because I think it is more like a consultation. I like the idea and would love to have more indepth time with customers, and a few I do, but most are not looking for that. I do have lots of pet care information on just about everything as free handouts though.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    792

    Default

    I do a lot of interpersonal work with my clients but I don't advertise as holistic. Some clients are "a dog is just a dog" and just drop them off and don't care to speak with me in great detail. Then there are "The dog is my family" and will want to have a whole talk about the groom. I'm happy to do whatever the client wants.

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