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  1. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    418

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    Quote Originally Posted by Particentral View Post
    AND YET they sell them to the general public. How many OWNERS do you think do this to their own animals????
    yep...AND places like petsomething put a lot of emphasis on trying to upsell the furminator treatment which includes using the tool. So a lot of owners think this is the only way to control shedding. I can't tell you how many people have asked me for the furminator treatment and get mad when I say I don't use that tool or even those shampoos. I have better ways of doing the job and safer too.

    when I first started as a bather I gave a bad burn to a yellow lab on accident. I was handed the furminator and told that it was safe and basically to have at it. Luckily it was only a small area, but I felt awful for the dog and thought for sure I'd be fired. She was bleeding like crazy. Her owners were actually understanding. still...after that, I have always hated the things. (I know that they can safely be used, but I prefer to not have one.)

  2. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Michigan!!!
    Posts
    1,349

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pretzel View Post
    yep...AND places like petsomething put a lot of emphasis on trying to upsell the furminator treatment which includes using the tool. So a lot of owners think this is the only way to control shedding. I can't tell you how many people have asked me for the furminator treatment and get mad when I say I don't use that tool or even those shampoos. I have better ways of doing the job and safer too.

    when I first started as a bather I gave a bad burn to a yellow lab on accident. I was handed the furminator and told that it was safe and basically to have at it. Luckily it was only a small area, but I felt awful for the dog and thought for sure I'd be fired. She was bleeding like crazy. Her owners were actually understanding. still...after that, I have always hated the things. (I know that they can safely be used, but I prefer to not have one.)
    You know what gets me a ton of deshedding business? A giant well designed poster that says "better than the furminator." Clients ask for it because that's all they know, but if they read and come to their own conclusions about there be another secret out there, they get really excited.

  3. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    418

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    Quote Originally Posted by SetterGirl View Post
    You know what gets me a ton of deshedding business? A giant well designed poster that says "better than the furminator." Clients ask for it because that's all they know, but if they read and come to their own conclusions about there be another secret out there, they get really excited.
    what a great idea!

  4. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Humboldt
    Posts
    2,127

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pretzel View Post
    what a great idea!
    I agree and yes I understand the heavy hand use of the furm. New hires come in like wrestlers sometimes and it's like STOP!!!!!!!!!!!

  5. #29

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    BEFORE YOU BLAME FURMINATION PLEASE READ THIS FIRST
    I am an owner, not a professional. Our dog was bathed and fulminated and approximately two days later, he appeared to have a terrible "burn" on his back, from neck to rump, the width of his back, especially on the length of his spine. It is terrible. After reading this thread, I was ready to throw my Furminators out!

    That would have been a mistake.

    The reality is there is a staph-like infection that animals can catch from the SHAMPOO! Of course, it is obvious, that bacteria can grow in shampoo and be transferred to the pet even if there is a small lesion. I had no idea how dangerous this can be. Possibly the FURminator could have caused the lesion, or even a mosquito bite, or just being a dog. It is highly improbable that the FURminator was a part of the problem.

    The treatment is intense antibiotics, surface antibacterial shampoo, much pain medicine. Its a hard road for weeks.

    The way to avoid this problem:
    - regular replacement of shampoo .. no old stuff
    - do not apply the shampoo directly to the dog. Immediate premix in a watered down solution and apply. Beware common source shampoo mixing in advance and holding overnight, god forbid for days.
    - 100% assurance that all shampoo is removed from the dog.
    - 100% assurance the dog is completely dry ... yes, this is tough, but do the job.
    - disinfect the FURminator between each use ... just like a barber or hairdresser does for humans ... its the exact same reason

    Of course, please research a delicate hand with a FURminator. Avoid the spine and tail and joints. Just do the research for the care.

    Please research "post-grooming bacterial folliculitis-furunculosis."

    http://www.friendshiphospital.com/fr...-furunculosis/

  6. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    178

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    To bolster Alexrogo's claims, this is an excerpt for the Double K website (the whole article is very informative).

    "Many groomers are “self trained” and are simply unaware how products can become contaminated in their shops. Improper hygiene can lead to an infection on an animal which is bathed with a shampoo or conditioning solution that has been contaminated with bacteria, virus, mold or fungus. This type of infection sometimes expresses itself as bumps or pustules, most often along the back of the animal. While these infections are not generally serious, they may require a visit to the veterinarian for antibiotics and/or steroids."

  7. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    78

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexRogo View Post
    BEFORE YOU BLAME FURMINATION PLEASE READ THIS FIRST
    I am an owner, not a professional. Our dog was bathed and fulminated and approximately two days later, he appeared to have a terrible "burn" on his back, from neck to rump, the width of his back, especially on the length of his spine. It is terrible. After reading this thread, I was ready to throw my Furminators out!

    That would have been a mistake.

    The reality is there is a staph-like infection that animals can catch from the SHAMPOO! Of course, it is obvious, that bacteria can grow in shampoo and be transferred to the pet even if there is a small lesion. I had no idea how dangerous this can be. Possibly the FURminator could have caused the lesion, or even a mosquito bite, or just being a dog. It is highly improbable that the FURminator was a part of the problem.

    The treatment is intense antibiotics, surface antibacterial shampoo, much pain medicine. Its a hard road for weeks.

    The way to avoid this problem:
    - regular replacement of shampoo .. no old stuff
    - do not apply the shampoo directly to the dog. Immediate premix in a watered down solution and apply. Beware common source shampoo mixing in advance and holding overnight, god forbid for days.
    - 100% assurance that all shampoo is removed from the dog.
    - 100% assurance the dog is completely dry ... yes, this is tough, but do the job.
    - disinfect the FURminator between each use ... just like a barber or hairdresser does for humans ... its the exact same reason

    Of course, please research a delicate hand with a FURminator. Avoid the spine and tail and joints. Just do the research for the care.

    Please research "post-grooming bacterial folliculitis-furunculosis."

    http://www.friendshiphospital.com/fr...-furunculosis/
    I got a petairapy unit and flash my tools after every day with UV sanitation, EASY PEASY

  8. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    4,362

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    That's how my first lab's face looked, but 10xs worse after she was bit by a black or African Brown widow.. not sure. I'm not saying dog was bit, but yeah.. maybe furminator or flea treatment. But since we weren't there... I feel bad for everyone involved.

    Kind of interesting, but I've been using Revolution for a long time, but the last time I used it on my cats.. only one cat, and I check my cats every night... she had a bald spot where I applied it. Just bald. No redness, just hair loss.

    What I don't understand is the owner's comment.. "how is she going to be groomed again" or something like that? Well, take her to a different groomer or bathe her yourself. Oooh I'm cranky again lol.
    Debbie
    There's always room for another rose in the garden.

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