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  1. #1

    Beaming Cargo Trailer A/C Cooling

    Hi dear groomers!

    I am finding out how expensive A/C units are. Does anyone know what is the least expensive and most efficient way to cool a cargo trailer fast? Does anyone plug in their A/C unit into customers home? If so, how do customers feel about that? Is the power amperage from the A/C too much for customers homes, or does that work just fine? And what mobile A/C units are recommended?

    Thank you for your inputs on this. This problem is really stumping me right now. All opinions highly welcomed and appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by FancyfurGroomer View Post
    Hi dear groomers!

    I am finding out how expensive A/C units are. Does anyone know what is the least expensive and most efficient way to cool a cargo trailer fast? Does anyone plug in their A/C unit into customers home? If so, how do customers feel about that? Is the power amperage from the A/C too much for customers homes, or does that work just fine? And what mobile A/C units are recommended?

    Thank you for your inputs on this. This problem is really stumping me right now. All opinions highly welcomed and appreciated.
    A rooftop AC unit is almost always the best cheapest oat effective solution. Some swear by portables - I do not.

    pplmotorhomes.com has great info on the various ac units and their amperage draws.

    As for the availability of home plug ins - yes blowing breakers when running an ac or a dryer is a distinct possibility. Especially if you are tapping ashamed circuit.
    As to whats normal there is no consensus, some say they only plug in and never have a single issue (unlikely) and other inis sit on being completely self powered.

    The only surefire way to have all the power need is with a dedicated genset of some sort and that opens up an even larger can of worms that can be dealt with but there are a ton of variables.

    Suggest you do some reading on generator threads - they are all here.

    Dave
    Last edited by Uncle Dave; 06-20-14 at 10:22 AM.

  3. #3

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    Thank you for your input. I just purchased a mobile air condition from Home Depot for $279 plus tax. I'm going to test it myself...see how fast it will cool down my cargo trailer. If it doesn't cool down fast enough, then I'll return it.

    Rooftop AC units are way too expensive. Lazy Days RV wanted $700 for a rooftop AC.
    I was told that as long as I don't go higher than a 15 amp AC and I use a thick extension cord all will be fine.

    Generators are a pain...needs fuel...noisey...can't be stored inside...might break down.
    Battery powered Power Inverters will use up batteries by constant draw of A/C.

  4. #4
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    The laws of physics are extremely reliable, bigger AC 's cool better but take more power and cost more money.

    The person that told you all you needed was a thick extension cord has no way of knowing what load may be on that same circuit. Portable don't draw much power but don't cool well either.

    Yup generators are a pain and are noisy, actually can be stored "inside" depending on the mount and what you are running, and do break down, but there is a reason why 98+ % of grooming vans you find new and or used have one.

    Home hook ups can't run your Air con and dryer load and aren't reliable.

    Let us know how it works out for you!

    UD

  5. #5
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    Those mobile AC units are for home use and cannot handle the heat generated by the HV dryer along with the trailer heat in general. Plus they cannot handle the dog hair that will be sucked into it and its impossible to clean the hair from the condenser coils. I have firsthand experience with the LG 8000 btu unit in a groom van that I worked on for a mobile groomer.
    They ultimately switched to a traditionL RV rooftop unit and it was night and day difference in cooling ability and access to clean.

    I can recommend a less expensive rooftop unit that I have and it was about $500, it's made by Gree. You can find it online and have it shipped.

    They can be plugged into a house and not pop a breaker (15 amp) as long as there's no other draw on that circuit which in most cases there is and that's why so many people have trouble plugging in.

  6. #6
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    I have a slightly different take than dave. Im not a fan of roof top units. For a trailer, I would throw up a bulkhead about 2' in from the rear and mount a wall unit in it. behind that wall put all your heat generating not to mention noisy devices. (HV, clipper vac, house vac ect.) on the roof put a powered vent to exhaust the humidity. I use a 8-8.5K btu unit, they run 250 or so and when they start to struggle after 3-4 years (S Fla heat) I just toss it and slip a new one in.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by wbeatty View Post
    I have a slightly different take than dave. Im not a fan of roof top units. For a trailer, I would throw up a bulkhead about 2' in from the rear and mount a wall unit in it. behind that wall put all your heat generating not to mention noisy devices. (HV, clipper vac, house vac ect.) on the roof put a powered vent to exhaust the humidity. I use a 8-8.5K btu unit, they run 250 or so and when they start to struggle after 3-4 years (S Fla heat) I just toss it and slip a new one in.
    A small room air conditioner mounted in a bulkhead is a good way to go.
    Your awesome inverter and rolls set could certainly handle that for a while although its still a big load.
    (wbetty has the biggest inveter setup Ive seen on these boards.)

    Of course you need the 2" to be able to do it but starting from scratch thats a great idea.
    Much wider selection of units as well and you can always catch a window shaker on sale.

    As long as an 8K unit does it for you, thats great.

    A 13.5 wont cool a sprinter or van real well in the valley, but the 15 gets it done
    On the westside an 8K would be great 90% of the time.

    Southern California doles out a bit of everything.

    I'm only a fan of roof airs in that they are easy to find new and used, easy to mount, and easy to "soup up" they are only really complete and workable in my eyes when they have had hard start kits in them yes this drives up the price but lets you run a reasonably sized genset and still reliably start them.

    Rv parts places usually have good tested AC's for a few hundred bucks to full price if you can swing the labor reasonably but hen you are of coerces gambling on a lifespan.



    UD
    Last edited by Uncle Dave; 06-22-14 at 02:06 PM.

  8. #8
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    Ive never really under stood the disparity in BTU ratings between the different styles of AC units. I will have to look into souping up the one on our elite.

  9. #9
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    its tons of cooling power per hour. The standard bigger is more and harder electrically.

    Check out the dometic smart start and the far more affordable units from Supco- they have a great primer on hard start kits.

    UD

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    Lots of good info, like this thread.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Dave View Post
    its tons of cooling power per hour. The standard bigger is more and harder electrically.

    Check out the dometic smart start and the far more affordable units from Supco- they have a great primer on hard start kits.

    UD
    Thanks Dave

  12. #12
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    Happy to share!

    One of these devices is often the tipping point at a home outlet.

    After installing a Supco hard start kit I had a 50% reduction in popped breakers,

    Additionally I found I could reliably start and run a 13.5 on a single honda 2K. (around sea level) .

    Since I began using these devices I have not lost a compressor or had any failure of any of my - van based Ac units, toy hauler air conditioner, motor home air con units. A "fast start" seems to be at least one key to keeping them alive and well.

    Eager to hear about your new setup!

    UD
    Last edited by Uncle Dave; 07-02-14 at 12:24 PM.

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