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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Washington state
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    6,181

    Tech No More Ear Plucking! - BBird Article

    Barbara posted this to her GroomWise Blog http://groomwise.typepad.com/bbird/2...-plucking.html but she wanted to make sure that the most groomers would read it, so we are also posting here. Stephen

    NO EAR PLUCKING!

    Contrary to what you may have been taught, requested, or commanded in the past, the current advice from veterinary dermatologists is that plucking ear hair can do more harm than good. Rather than prevent ear infections, this procedure can actually create a greater likelihood of infection by damaging the tender inner ear tissue and allowing a foothold for bacteria to thrive.

    In her presentation to Tucson groomers, “Ears: What Every Groomer Needs to Know”, Dr. Heide Newton, DVM, DACVD plainly stated that groomers should stop plucking ear hair from inside dog’s ears. “Healthy ears are self-cleaning”, stated Dr. Newton. She encouraged groomers to continue the practice of ear cleaning, however, using products formulated for ear care, and massaging the base of the ear to allow the product to loosen wax and debris from deep in the ear canal.

    Another clear statement from Dr. Newton was that “Bathing with clean water will NOT cause ear infections.” Contaminated water may introduce microbes that lead to ear infections, but clean water is not a problem.

    The possibility of cross-contamination from an infected ear to the other ear or another animal is the one area where groomers might be at fault. It is very possible for pseudomonas bacteria to transfer from the ear to various surfaces and then be picked up by other animals or even humans. The most obvious sign of a pseudomonas infection is what vets call a “purulent exudate”. Translation: yucky discharge. If the groomer suspects an ear infection, Dr. Newton suggested the following protocol:
    1. Clean the GOOD ear first.
    2. If the ear with the suspected infection is cleaned, be gentle and use a non-stinging ear cleaner. The groomer may also choose to not clean an ear with a suspected infection, especially if it looks serious.
    3. Disinfect everything that the dog has contact with or might spray with shaking of the ears. This includes, your hands, the tub, the faucets, any tools, the table, the kennel and bedding, and the tip or spout of the ear cleaner bottle.
    In addition to ear discharge, other signs of ear abnormality are redness, itchiness, odor, swollen tissue of outer ear, hair loss on earflap, and scabs or scaliness. Ear problems are often quite complex and difficult to nail down and treat. A referral to the veterinary dermatologist can result in a quicker and more accurate diagnosis and more effective treatment, thus lessening the time the pet has to suffer with uncomfortable, often painful conditions. By encouraging pet parents to seek treatment for suspected ear problems, the professional groomer is serving the needs of the pet.

    Veterinary dermatologists such as Dr. Newton, undergo several years additional training and examinations beyond that required of general practitioners. Dr. Newton is part of Dermatology for Animals, a network of veterinary dermatologists serving the Southwest United States. In addition to working full-time in the Tucson practice, she currently serves on the American College of Veterinary Dermatology (ACVD) Exam Committee (the certifying board) and is a lecturer for the North American Veterinary Dermatology Forum (NAVDF) Resident Education Forum.


    Additional References:
    Pseudomonas Article - http://www.allergyearskincare.com/an...rticle/81.html
    Most questions regarding GroomerTALK are answered in the FAQ section, or in the Board Help Forum. Thanks for coming to PetGroomer.com http://www.petgroomer.com.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    263

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    OMG FINALLY!!! Now if only the vets will read and stop telling their client to berate the groomers for not plucking. If anything will cause me to stop grooming ( Which I love to do) it will be ear plucking. TBH I think it is CRUEL to pluck ears... especially schnauzers.. wonder how the owners would like having their shorthairs plucked? Either come up with something to numb the ear or stop plucking. A Local vet shaves all the visible hair.. I wondered if that caused probs inside the ear since that hair isnt being yanked out but instead is building up?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    florida
    Posts
    1,051

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    I've seen plenty of "unplucked" ears on dogs and there's no way it was healthy to leave the hair building up in there. The ear canal was completely blocked by the hair, which loaded up with ear wax. You cannot clean past a giant wad of hair.

    I'm not saying pluck EVERY ear, nor that EVERY hair much be plucked. But many ears left unplucked are going to end up infected and blocked with debris and wax.

    And I don't care who says differently. I've seen accredited vets claim that doodles need no hair cuts too. If someone doesn't want to pluck ears, then fine. But to say no dog ear ever needs plucking? No way. I'll leave this so everyone who doesn't want to pluck ears can congratulate themselves.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    451

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    I tell my clients that three is an ongoing debate in the veterinary community on plucking or not plucking.

    I gently remove hair that comes out easily without powder and scissor or shave the rest to make sure three is adequate ventilation.

    Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    2,815

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    In grooming school, I saw aspiring groomers and the teacher wrap hunks of ear hair around a hemostat and yank. You know that had to hurt. I'm sure it caused small abrasions that could become infected. These were not dogs whose ears were filled with hair. They had some hair, not a lot. Those poor dogs.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    10,840

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    Been sYing this for years! Auburn vet school says the same thing. And no one said to leave hair. Just not to pluck it. Shave it. Scissor it. Leave it.JJust don't pluck it.
    My Blog The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    451

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Emma123 View Post
    In grooming school, I saw aspiring groomers and the teacher wrap hunks of ear hair around a hemostat and yank. You know that had to hurt. I'm sure it caused small abrasions that could become infected. These were not dogs whose ears were filled with hair. They had some hair, not a lot. Those poor dogs.
    I was taught that way in grooming school too. I'm sure it hurt and l am very happy to not ever do it again.

    Hemostats are for making and applying bows now.

    Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    2,463

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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy-hound View Post
    I've seen plenty of "unplucked" ears on dogs and there's no way it was healthy to leave the hair building up in there. The ear canal was completely blocked by the hair, which loaded up with ear wax. You cannot clean past a giant wad of hair.

    I'm not saying pluck EVERY ear, nor that EVERY hair much be plucked. But many ears left unplucked are going to end up infected and blocked with debris and wax.

    And I don't care who says differently. I've seen accredited vets claim that doodles need no hair cuts too. If someone doesn't want to pluck ears, then fine. But to say no dog ear ever needs plucking? No way. I'll leave this so everyone who doesn't want to pluck ears can congratulate themselves.
    Ditto! Trust me, I wouldn't pluck my own dog's ears unless it was absolutely necessary. But he grows big thick wads of hair and builds up a ton of wax abd moisture underneath. Just clipping that hair short doesn't even help. So I pluck just enough to let some air down there and make cleaning feasible.

    I do think there's a lot of dogs who shouldn't be plucked, but you have to be careful with sweeping generalizations.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    263

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    Hairs that are not deeply rooted I have no problem pulling, but when the hair is so deeply rooted and fingers cannot pull it, and the dog is fighting, biting, screaming and doing everything possible to avoid it... why continue? I have no prob snipping or shaving the hair out but if it is that much of a fight and the dog is that traumatize I will tell the owner to take the dog to the vet have em sedated and get that hair out.I have a poodle that comes in that has extremely thick.. deep rooted ear hair. None of the hair comes out easy, it breaks off before it comes out.. even with resin. I get what I can before the dog goes insane then thats it, the owner will either take it to the vet to have it done or find another groomer to do it. I am NOT in this profession to torture an animal, which when it is that deeply rooted I consider it torture.
    Why cant they come up with something to desensitize that can be carefully swabbed? hmmm I wonder if clove oil would work.. never thought of that.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    florida
    Posts
    1,051

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    You can't shave off hair down in the ear canal. If you're plucking hair that is outside the ear canal, you're doing it wrong.

    And I'm not stuffing a pair of scissors down there anyway.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    1,944

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    For dogs with major ear hair with a yeasty/ infected ear I dont touch...I say it need to be done at a vet and flushed after the vet gets the wad of yellow slimy muck and dirt out of the ear. I usually only see that type of dog in once or twice a year dogs...poor dogs. At this point none of my regulars have major issues.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    10,840

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    Hair in ears protects the inner ear. It allows the fluids to drain (it acts like a wick) preventing the fluids from building up in the inner ear. It keeps out dirt and debris. It also prevents water from getting "vacuum sealed" as a vet told me once. Trapped water can cause pressure and infection the hair prevents that from happening because it breaks up the area and no vacuum can occur. No one is saying stick a pair of shears down in the ear canal. We are saying trim it close.

    Those who pluck BRAVO! Go for it! I will not. I have seen the redness soreness, head shaking, hematomas that can occur. I have also seen the incidence of infections drop from 50 percent or higher to practically non existent in my shop since we stopped plucking. I see very few infections of any type since we stopped using qtips, cotton balls, ear cleaner and plucking.

    A good basic ear washing with the shampoo, rinsed out, and ear hair trimmed not plucked equals happy healthy ears...

    I went to a class on ear hygiene once myself. the vet that gave the class actually said that COTTON balls are less abrasive than water....I almost laughed out loud.
    My Blog The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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