Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    132

    Default Finding a groomer position after petsomething training

    I currently work for one of the big corporate stores where I recieved a month of grooming academy after which I had to groom 100 dogs under salon manager supervision before I could start making commission. Before this I had worked 6 months as a bather at one coporate store then went to the competition big store where I was a bather for 6 months before my grooming academy. I've been out of academy since the end of October, so about 6 months. So a year of bather experience, technically 7 months of grooming (by the end of this month), plus the grooming of friends and family members dogs I did for a couple years before all this (I know most don't count this though), and if it helps I went to college for vet assistant for 2 years and have interned at vet clinics (more so i think this counts for animal handling skills). I've also had dogs my entire life as well as other animals. Anyway, with all of this what would it take for any of you with your own salons to hire me as a groomer? I'm really looking to get into a private owned salon, especially because I'm expecting my 2nd child in the next few weeks I want to see what I can find while on maternity leave. I don't know if it looks worse but I'm technically under contract with them for 2 years since I went through academy, but I don't know if I can handle working for them that long, if I have to I'll pay back for the academy, but I need to find a grooming position with more regular hours (like 8-5 or something).

    I do have some pics of my grooms, but I need to know how you decide to hire someone if you are adding a groomer to your salon. Do you require a certain number of pics and specifically need before and after pics? Do you have a dog come in to show their grooming abilities on? Or do you need grooming references? I'm trying to see what I need to be putting together if I find some groomer jobs to apply for over maternity leave. I don't know if I'm being rediculous expecting a place to hire me as a groomer with only 7 months of grooming in a salon. Would it help to have references from other groomers who I've worked with and who've seen me groom?

    I know a lot of people don't think the big chain stores do very good training but I have to say the groomer who trained me and my fellow groomers in academy is a very good groomer. I know that can be a matter of opinion be she has many years of experience grooming as well as probably hundreds of request grooming clients.

    Do you all think I can get a position with a small salon? I know alls I can do is try, I just want to see if it is resonable to think I can get one or not and what they might ask of me to prove I'm a good groomer. Thanks! I just want to have normal hours so I can raise my kids with a schedule, not missing all the important things in their lives and having time to spend with them and my boyfriend, right now my changing shifts with such variation in hours just doesn' allow it not to mention having to work a lot of holidays...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    WI
    Posts
    147

    Default

    I can't speak for all private salons but I think a desire to learn and passion for dogs would serve you well in mine. We would give you a test dog, see where you're skills are.
    So yes I would say there are plenty of salons who would hire a freshly taught groomer. So long as you work hard and try to learn something new everyday.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Sunny Southern Cal.
    Posts
    441

    Default

    What a shame you don't live in Cali Luvs! I have had great luck hiring newer groomers from our local corp. stores. When I interview,I always have prospective employees come into the shop and do an entire day of working interview. I'm not huge on portfolios,simply because I am more focused on the process. I want to see how you work,treatment of the dogs,speed, and interaction with my staff and me. Plus as sad as it is.... have seen fake portfolios. Don't let your inexperience stop you from going for what you want. Some shops will not want to "finish" a groomer but some will love the opportunity to advance you and mold you toward their shop culture. Good luck! And Happy Baby Time!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    453

    Default

    Not everyone will be open to hiring you but a lot of places will be. Put together a portfolio to show what you are capable of as this is what will get you an interview. Every place works differently but a lot of places I know will have you come in for an interview and if that goes well they will have you do a working interview next. During the working interview you will groom a few dogs and they can see how fast you work, your attitude, your quality of work and more. If all goes well during that you will most likely be hired on.
    If you have an open and eager attitude to learn more this really helps. Mostly though it's the potential they see in you. Of course some salons just don't have/want to take the time to work with a newer groomer. I find no matter waht type of job you are applying for don't go into the interview expecting to get or not get the job but rather focus on a friendly, positive attitude and you might be surprised at the opportunities that will present themselves to you.
    Good luck and don't be nervous!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    The Big C, TX
    Posts
    2,739

    Surprise Cat

    Honestlly I've seen some good grooms and some bad grooms come out of corp salons, but I do know that in my area you really have to prove yourself to a private salon that you are a good groomer (we have corp salons every five feet I swear).

    Portfilos I like to see a wide range of dogs not just 7 and 10's I also like happy people who have a willingness to learn on their own as well as in a salon setting.

    I to do working interviews and I prefer to interview that way too.
    Never gonna know if you never even try

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    central Florida area
    Posts
    23

    Default

    how does a working interview work?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    88

    Default

    I work for a Petsomething at the moment. However, I was trained at one of the two grooming academies in my state before I started working for the corporate place. I had two jobs in private shops after my schooling and had very negative experiences with both. So I decided to try bathing for a corporate place and then making the decision as to if I wanted to actually groom in that setting.

    My grooming instructor had always told me it would look bad on my resume but it would be an excellent place to work on my speed. I disagree completely on the speed, I have to stop 80% of the time for customer service so I am way slower than when I worked in private shops that were quieter. To say the least I never wanted to groom in that setting ha. But ended up having to because as a bather I was always fighting for hours. My plan is to either start doing housecall grooming pr find another grooming job simply because the hours constantly change every week. I want 8-5 too.

    I have recently been applying for other jobs. I did not get one of them that I applied for. And the others just were not going to work for me. I have another interview with a vet clinic next week. I have had no issues with my background in regards to petsomething goes (this is where I have the majority of my work history). As long as you can show the work you can do either through pictures and working interview you should be fine. My problem is most of the dogs I do are one length all over cuts. And most places like to see breed cuts. I don't have a lot of pictures of those dogs. Not that I'm not capable of breed cuts, just I rarely get to go them

    Good luck! I think you will be fine. In my experience I have seen many people leave with out completing the two years. But I imagine it's different for every store/area.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    6

    Default

    I was in your shoes a few months ago, and if I had it to do all over again, I would definitely create a portfolio with before and after pictures. If you do that, be sure to include a wide variety of grooms; breed-specific clips, guard/scissor cuts, specialty poodle clips, etc. Your potential employer may not care to see one, but it can't hurt to have one as a back-up if they won't give you a working interview.

    I found out the hard way that corporate salons are looked down on by the grooming industry in my area, and I had a hard time getting another job. One of my co-workers, on the other hand, always has a current portfolio on a cd, and she has never had a problem with getting her foot in the door of private salons.

  9. #9

    Default

    We have had quite a bit of luck with corp to mobile people. When we hire, I'm mostly interested in can you do a great groom on a variety of breeds and can I train you in the way we interact with clients. There are excellent groomers that can't be bothered to talk with people, as well as sunny dispositions but lack of experience in grooming.

    That said, many would like to leave the corp environment and move to mobile. We have a three day shift (long days!) that attracts many people as you get your work done and have 4 days off.

    Bottom line: I don't hold it against you if you worked a big box.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •