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  1. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    409

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    I would not be dematting an elderly cocker. The humane and safe option is to shave. Though even shaving a geriatric dog can be a challenge for someone less experienced. I personally still do not like working on old dogs because of the difficulty.

  2. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    2,036

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    Quote Originally Posted by desertdogs64 View Post
    a 7, 8 1/2 or a 10 for very matted pets, home study courses seem like a waste of money, I have been grooming since 1983 ,after spending 6 months in pet grooming school, You must ALWAYS think of the dog first, what the customers wants is okay if it can be done,but trying to brush out a old matted up cocker is kinda cruel, over the years I have had many disagreements with pet owners who want what they think their dog should look like, but what they fail to realize ,the dogs they see in nice full coats are brushing and groomed on a regular basis,please think of the dog next time.
    Let me say that first of all, I learned the theory side of grooming from an online grooming course, but I also was working as a bather/brusher at the time, and learning as much as I could from the groomer I worked for. You definitely need the experience from a skilled groomer before you go out on your own. I read and study still, watch videos, etc to help myself get better. It also helps being friends with other groomers. The online courses are ok for a base, but you do still need the practicing aspect as well.

  3. #15

    Sad Thanks for the responses

    If I could take a professional course I would. The closest one is over 2 hours away. I've asked at all of the grooming places in our area and none of them would let me even observe. (There are only a few) The closest pet store type salon is an hour away. Not a practical choice for everyday work. Where I live it is very rural. I do not have the options that all of you have.
    Yes the groom was going to be free either way. The lady told me it had had cancer last year. I did not pull or tug unneccessarily or endlessly. Not once did the dog nip at or try to get away from me except when I would try to do his bottom. That is why I did not do it.
    I was just wondering what you all thought would be good business practice. The reason the lady didn't want a shave was because I'm new and learning and she was aware of the lumps. I was a nurse (and a good one) for 10 years so even though it's a dog and not a person I think I would recognize distress. I just can't keep up the long hours of nursing with 3 kids and no husband around anymore.
    I've got to say this is the most unwelcoming board I've ever been on. I've had read a lot of posts and it seems to be the same thing. Almost all the "skilled" groomers put down and discourage the new ones. Are you afraid they'll take your job. Hope I find another site that is a little more willing to advise. Some of us don't have the options to do it the "right" way.

  4. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Everywhere
    Posts
    5,183

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    That seemed to go over well.....sure right....I have NEVER seem this called an unfriendly fourm befor. UUummmmm, YOU ask for our opinion, just because YOU did not get the answers YOU wanted to hear, we are unfriendly?
    These ladys are both older experanced groomers AND a lot of young just getting started groomers that are just telling you how it is, they.are being helpful! You would do.well to listen to them because we want All groomers to make it.
    NO we are not afraid of you taking our customers.
    Ain't always easy to stand up for what is right.

  5. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Washington state
    Posts
    6,135

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    Always a difficult subject, but please let's use the complete words. Online is HANDS ON. Online students have to find pets to groom. Online or home study does not mean they don't touch pets. Schools provide the pets and should have direct supervision. Home study means they have to find the pets and take pictures for review of their distance learning instructors.

    So let's not blatantly say there is no hands on to home study. It sure sounds that way to many people who read the board. There is hands on in home study, and in fact, there is NO LIMIT when you think about it. They are assisted in ways to find pets. What they don't have is IMMEDIATE supervision as they groom.

    So it is better to criticize for not having immediate supervision than to imply there is no hands on because there is hands on. And yet we have schools that provide little supervision as well, no evaluation, in fact you can sometimes get more evaluation through correspondence than some schools.

    It is definitely a briar patch. Please tread lightly on our newcomers no matter what. They will come to understand, takes some patience please. Be cool.
    Most questions regarding GroomerTALK are answered in the FAQ section, or in the Board Help Forum. Thanks for coming to PetGroomer.com http://www.petgroomer.com.

  6. #18

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    I do and will take into consideration anything posted on here because I DO want to learn.
    Take a look at some of the responses to anyone asking questions about opening a shop when they haven't been a groomer forever. Some are downright nasty. I know how women are so I don't take it personally. It's just a little disheartening to see so many people telling you that you aren't going to be any good if you don't go to a professional school and get years of training first. I feel that this is a job that requires talent not just training and no matter what school you go to you could be good at it or not. I'm not trying to pass myself off as skilled they know I'm learning and that I will put the dog's comfort and safety first.

  7. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    157

    Huh

    I am so sorry you felt unwelcome here. I'm sure that was not the intention of anyone. I think everyone is just looking out for you (liability-wise) and, of course, the dog.

    I understand how difficult it can be to get going in this business in certain areas. Can you look for a bather job with a local groomer? That way you can gain hands on experience and still work on dogs at home.

    Good luck, I'm sure you will figure out a way to make this work. It is worth it. And consider sticking around here. As a new groomer I can't begin to tell you the wealth of knowledge and great advice I've already gotten from everyone here.

    Diane

  8. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    WI
    Posts
    1,371

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerseygroom View Post
    I am so sorry you felt unwelcome here. I'm sure that was not the intention of anyone. I think everyone is just looking out for you (liability-wise) and, of course, the dog.

    Good luck, I'm sure you will figure out a way to make this work. It is worth it. And consider sticking around here. As a new groomer I can't begin to tell you the wealth of knowledge and great advice I've already gotten from everyone here. Diane
    Good advice Diane. When I started grooming professionally almost 7 years ago I knew I didn't know very much about pet grooming. I had been grooming my own show dogs for 20+ years, but that is vastly different than grooming the wide variety (health and type) of dogs that I come across in this business. This board has been a god-send... I was on a different board initially and was "put down" for only being able to groom 5 dogs in an 8 hour day when I had only been grooming 2 months. Because there are so many experienced, long-term career groomers here, one can get a lot of different opinions and wonderful help! Stay and learn Brittandan!

  9. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Inland Empire
    Posts
    3,118

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    The thing is, most new groomers need a heavy dose of reality. I'm, I don't know, "lucky", I guess? To be plunk in the middle of about 6 diff grooming schools. All advertise you will be ready to open your own biz in 8-12 weeks! Wtf? Can you think of any other profession where that would acceptable? Would you go to a hairdresser who had only been trained for 12 weeks? A mechanic? A plumber? A contractor? Yet, we, who spend our days with live animals and sharp objects think its just peachy? I will never understand that! I have interviewed people who have been full on groomers for 2-3 years who couldn't even properly bathe a dog. Out of all the people ive interviewed out of school, not once have i felt remotely comfortable at starting them as a full fledged groomer. So yes, experience in not only trims but safety and sanitation is absolutely ideal. Thats not sour grapes girlfriend, that's wisdom.

    I admire your search for expanding your knowledge base but you have to understand that you are simply green. And pointing that out is not mean or cruel. It's reality! Which is actually the best place to start. I always say the easiest thing about being smart is knowing what you're dumb at. Being honest about areas you need improvement allows you to work on them. I, for one, can't do math. Like, at all. I swear I can actually hear my calculator laughing at me sometimes. But I love English. So I write essays and speeches and classes, but you will never see me respond to a number related question on here lol. So instead of getting defensive, open your eyes and listen. If you stick around there is a LOT to learn.
    There are 3 different kinds of people in this world: Dog people, cat people, and rational people who don't have a problem liking two things at the same time.

  10. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Surprise,AZ
    Posts
    4,385

    Default

    well i dont find the board unfriendly or anything of the such....BUT....what i think most of the groomers that responded to your post were focusing on the age and health of the dog and the amount of experience you have actually hands on.

    i know alot of us dont like taking on the elderly dogs due to their age/health issues/temperments etc.
    i would suggest perhaps you dont take on elderly dogs until you gain more experience. i understand your in a tough situtation...closest school being 2 hrs away, and no one who actually has a shop wanting to take you on to give you some observince or training of any sort.

    and sometimes online or learning by yourself is the only way someone is going to get to learn how to groom....it does take talent to groom a dog...its not all about the techincal parts ie how to hold the clipper properly, set patterns, how to properly scissor the dog.....i know we had one person who worked with us who did HORRID shavedowns..and didnt do very good shih tzus but could turn out a nice pattern dog! (ie schn. westies,cairns,etc)

    so it takes talent to be able to do ALL types of dogs out there!

    i say stick with it and keep trying but avoid taking on id say any dog over the age of 10 yrs old. just explain to the owners that your not experienced enough with elderly dogs and you wouldnt want something to happen to their pet and you would prefer they go to a groomer who is more experienced in dealing with the elderly guys.

    i hope to see you around on the board!
    Hound

  11. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    A, A
    Posts
    72

    Beaming I would have a different response

    I think the question was would you have suggestions on the grooming of this well loved dog. Without knowing a persons life story I would be hesitant to give such detailed feedback. It was clear that she was new and doing a home study course. This is all that is available to some of us. Many of us are looking for support in life. I wish you the very best!

  12. #24

    Default

    On the recommendation of one of the great people on here that did give me advice. I decided to explain a little further. I did do a thorough check on the dog, eyes alert, coat shiny, ran around playing with my son before the groom. No signs of distress (ie heavy panting, limping etc) Not once during the groom or bath did he try to nip at or get away from me except when I tried to brush out and dry his rear. That is why it did not get done. What I was trying to ask I guess is what to say to the client, and how assertive/cautious do you need to be when trying to get a dog finished. I am unwilling to cause pain so don't worry about that. But I mean when a dog just isn't cooperative. Was there anything else I should be looking for regarding the health of the pet that I'm forgetting? Also any recommendations on books or videos to further learn. I've already gotten sam kohl's all breed dog grooming and have ordered notes from the grooming table (haven't got it yet though).

    PS I think I was a little overwhelmed at the responses, I do appreciate any advice and will try not to be so sensitive in future.

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