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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Seabrook, Texas
    Posts
    228

    Default Approaching Vet clinic without a groomer

    Hello All,

    I have been reading back threads in this regard, but have a few questions.

    First, the scenario:

    I cannot quite pull together the funds to go it alone, but I am highly motivated to have something that is my creation to work at. So, the solution to my dilemma is to approach a vet who doesn't have a grooming department yet. I have been devising a business plan to present to the person I would meet with. It divides what I expect them to do and what I will do for the department.

    ~~~I would want to be considered an employee, with them paying taxes and booking my appointments, collecting money, and providing consumables and towel, tub and kennels. I would provide a lot more than the traditional grooming position seems to be where we provide our tools and skills only. I have the ability to come into the deal with a table, velocity dryer and kennel dryer, bows and bandanas, finishing sprays and biz cards, and many ideas I used at other hospital for marketing and advertising, my own health insurance and more. I would make my own schedule and make commission only thus allowing me to leave after grooming the only 2 dogs on the books. I have made a list deliniating what I would bring to the table and what they would bring to the table. I figure if I bring more up front, then I can ask for a higher percentage and pay back the relatively small investment in myself rather quickly.

    I had the best experience in a mom and pop vet hospital out in Georgia for 18 months before I had to move out of state and have been dreaming of a way to get back that fortunate position I had. I have also concluded that the best way to get that is to carve one out for myself. I understand that the first 6 months will be slow, but I am fortunate enough to not have to worry overly about that.

    I feel confident that I would be treated with respect because I was a CVT/LVN for years before becoming a groomer 5 years ago. So I know the lingo, the protocols, the procedures and the nuts and bolts of veterinary practises from the front to the back and everything in between. I had nothing but excellent experiences at my post in Georgia and one of the docs there was classified by many as difficult.

    I personally liked working with the "reject dogs" from other groomers because I enjoy a challenge and I also charged accordingly and made good money. The easiest money in the world is a strip down on a completely sedated cat. I also love the environment of medicine and listening in and contributing to conversations about medicine and case management.

    Does anyone have any advice or stories they'd like to share? Any idea of what a fair split is? I was thinking 70% 30%

    I am not very interested in IC because the thought of paying my own taxes gives me heartburn. The IRS aren't forgiving of newbs making mistakes.

    Oh yeah and I would clean up after myself.

    Thanks so much in advance for your advice!

    I wish you an easy day of good dogs, big tips and fun with co workers.

    JJ

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Washington state
    Posts
    5,761

    Tech Cat

    I've got a lot of help for you. When I taught the business side at grooming schools, those students planning on being self employed someday had to make a 1 or 2 minute presentation in front of the class. Usually it was a scenario just like yours, convincing a pet store owner, vet, daycare etc to build a grooming dept for them. They had to try on day one of the course, and usually it didn't go well, and then again on day 5. In just 5 days of training and they truly sounded like pros.

    You can read the actual presentations here.............

    http://www.petgroomer.com/next_generation.htm
    Most questions regarding GroomerTALK are answered in the FAQ section, or in the Board Help Forum. Thanks for coming to PetGroomer.com http://www.petgroomer.com.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Arlington, Texas
    Posts
    149

    Default

    I don't have a whole lot of advice for you except to tell you what I did for my current position. The clinic I work for had a groomer in the past but had been without for about a year. I did have clientele that went with me so building the business was not too hard. I get 60% and buy my own shampoos and tools. I use their kennels, towels, dryers, and tub. I am considered an employee and they pay part of my taxes. The receptionists book my appointments and check out the dogs. I check in clients and talk to clients that they recommend for grooming. I do choose how many dogs to book and what time I want them to come in. Hope this helps some.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Seabrook, Texas
    Posts
    228

    Default

    @ Admin: I just so happen to have "From Problems to Profits" on my bookshelf. LOL I bought it a few years ago when I was working at big box and really wanting to get out of that environment. Then, I found the vet post and was happy as a clam.
    Thanks for reminding me of the publication. I will start re-reading it again.
    The examples were terrific. My own business plan touched on most of the areas mentioned in their one minute plans, but were not as detailed as I wasn't sure how much detail I should go in to.
    I really appreciate you taking the time to give me that tool.
    @ TexasStylist: thanks for your input, it is greatly appreciated!

    JJ

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Seabrook, Texas
    Posts
    228

    Default Forgot a few questions

    As part of the business plan, I think it's paramount to demonstrate to the prospective facility a fairly accurate portrayal of what they can reasonably expect to pay for this additional department

    Does anyone know if there is additional liability insurance to be purchased on the vet's end? It would seem like NO, but I can't assume and then be wrong.

    Are there any huge payouts the facility would have to pay above and beyond the obvious water, gas, electric and about one hour a day in receptionist time, and employee taxes.

    I also won't be asking for paid sick days or paid vacation days in order to keep a higher percentage.

    Thanks again.
    JJ

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    2,367

    Default

    Just wanted to comment on what you said about paying your own taxes and being an IC. The IRS may seem intimidating, but they reserve their more forceful actions and penalties for people who deliberately mislead them -- for example, business owners who pretend that employees are IC's in order to evade paying taxes. I've found that when an individual makes a mistake, the IRS is more than willing to work out a payment plan. They were far easier to deal with than any other organization to which I owed money. If you talk to an accountant, they could get you set up so that you don't mess up the tax payments, so the IRS wouldn't even be an issue. If you want to be an employee, that's cool, but don't let fear of the IRS be the main factor.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    2,579

    Default

    I am a groomer that works for a vet we have an agreement to a 60/40 split. They purchase any consumables of my choice. I do color on my own and share non of the money from that work. They also provided a table and k92 dryer. I provided the tub and ran waste and water to the tub. I also have one small dryer that I use on occasion. I provided my recirc system also. They provide any advertising and receptionist. They book according to my schedule and if I am there I release dogs, if not they do. Typically I take in all dogs, but on occasion they have a dog coming in for a procedure who asks about grooming and they take the dog in and contact me. I come in only is I have dogs on the books, and leave when I am done. They provide towels and bedding and they clean and fold it and put it in my cupboard. Its take awhile to get busy but I think slowly we are becoming steady. I love working here, my vet and techs love and respect me.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Seabrook, Texas
    Posts
    228

    Default Thanks!

    I am almost done with my business proposal.
    If I can figure out how to paste it to this thread, I will.
    I appreciate everyone's input.
    JJ

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