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  1. #1
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    Apr 2007
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    Glasgow, Kentucky, United States
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    Confused Natural remedy for Hyperkeratosis?

    I have a few dogs coming into the shop with hyperkeratosis or at least that's what it looks like to me. They have the "feathered" looking overgrowth on the pads and crust on the nose. I have been trying a little oil to help soften up the nose crust, but I don't really know what to do with their feet to help them feel better. Does anyone have a suggestion for this?

  2. #2
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    Jan 2008
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    Madison, Wisconsin, United States
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    This is really a genuine disease that comes from within the genetic code of the dog. Have they worked with their vet at all on their end for the overall health of the dog? Do they have a care program they do at home at all?
    It isn't possible to get it to end from where we stand in the salon each day. But- we can help.
    You mentioned that you are using oils to help soften the growths and that does help. Keeping the pads well hydrated does help them to shed better and lessen the hardness of the feet for walking. The same goes for their noses- while most anything we apply to the nose will be licked off superficially, rubbing it well into the skin will give added benefit if you take the time to apply it well. For the nose it is very important to not use anything with strong scent as this can be irritating to the pet. I have Dr. Rose Remedies salve and I like it for things like this. On the paw pads, what I do for those who have overgrown callous, dry cracked feet or weepy nail beds from yeast is first a vinegar soak. Plain apple cider vinegar for 3 to 5 minutes before their bath. Then I wet the dog down to get ready to apply their shampoo. Then I go back & pack the feet & cover the pads with colloidal oatmeal powder that I wet with my fingers so it is like a paste. I leave that on while I wash the entire dog. I wash the feet last with the same shampoo I used on the pet. Then I rinse it out completely as I rinse the rest of the dog before the end of the bath. I will try to rub off as much off the dead callous as possible while rinsing the pet and that leaves the pad more open to absorb topical moisture products. On my table, I apply the Paw Massage Oil that I have which is available from my Canine Spa Therapies product line- its base is Extra Virgin Olive & Vitamin E oils, but you could possibly make your own to have on hand with simple knowledge of oils and how certain ones benefit the body. (However, it is readily available for the pet industry!) I rub this in very thoroughly before I even blow dry the dog so that it can absorb for the rest of their visit. Both of these oils are fast absorbers and help repair and encourage emerging new skin cell layers. From there, I finish the groom, and let that sink into the feet well. After the groom, I lift each foot and apply either my Paw Balm from Canine Spa Therapies, or I also like Davis' Pad Repair Cream as well. Rub this in well so that you know it won't get all over the client or their car. In one case, I do have a dog that comes in just for feet care between grooms. The dog gets the feet washed, packed, exfoliated, then I apply warmed oil and leave that on under the rubber slip on booties (they look like a deflated balloon) for about 10 minutes. They then come off & the pet gets the Paw Balm, the nail trim, and a paw massage during the course of this care. I have also heard of other groomers applying pure Vit.E oil with a cotton ball to the feet, or applying Bag Balm, or pure Bees Wax, or just even a heavy duty grooming industry paw cream or balm can help moisturize. I would not go with just a simple wax since you want attributes within the wax, cream or oils that genuinely penetrate and offer their healing properties for the damaged skin cells.
    The problem with this disease is the way that it tells the body to keep creating keratin layers- so it is important to not do anything to the feet by deep mechanical exfoliation that will tell the skin to work on repairing damage- or we could make it worse. Just keeping the feet moist gives comfort and us removing what is very ready to come off will help with buildup that also causes discomfort.
    Also, I ask that these clients have their pets in for regular nail trims so that I am sure the feet get pressure on them evenly and not have any additional pain from overgrown nails.
    Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
    www.ChrisSertzel.com

  3. #3
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    May 2007
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    Maryland
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    Great info Chris

  4. #4
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    Jan 2008
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    Madison, Wisconsin, United States
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fast Ellie View Post
    Great info Chris
    Hey, thanks!
    Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
    www.ChrisSertzel.com

  5. #5
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    Jul 2010
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    Alberta, Canada
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    When you talk about weeping nail beds, do you mean when there is wax that builds up on the nail and hair between the toes that is smelly, often seen with smelly warm ears on Yeasty, sensitive/ allergy dogs?


  6. #6
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    Apr 2007
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    Glasgow, Kentucky, United States
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    BIG thanks! This gives me lots of ideas for them. I have been using mineral oil as that's what I had on hand. I will try some of your ideas. Do you suggest trimming off the "feathered" areas of the pads? One of the dogs I do has very calloused pads, but most have that weird looking feathering on their pads.

    I am sure that most of these customers would probably be willing to apply things at home.

  7. #7
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    Jan 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by ItzaClip! View Post
    When you talk about weeping nail beds, do you mean when there is wax that builds up on the nail and hair between the toes that is smelly, often seen with smelly warm ears on Yeasty, sensitive/ allergy dogs?

    Yes. And also some of my Sproting dogs who are in the field that get their feet torn up and then get into soggy, moldy or algae filled standing water or even dirty lake water get this treatment also because their feet smell like gymsocks...
    Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
    www.ChrisSertzel.com

  8. #8
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    Jan 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by VestalTibSpan View Post
    BIG thanks! This gives me lots of ideas for them. I have been using mineral oil as that's what I had on hand. I will try some of your ideas. Do you suggest trimming off the "feathered" areas of the pads? One of the dogs I do has very calloused pads, but most have that weird looking feathering on their pads.

    I am sure that most of these customers would probably be willing to apply things at home.
    I wouldn't trim it as I have done than in the past and found that sometimes those feathers have a good supply of blood flow to them.
    Instead think of that as uneven wear of the tread on a tire-- its wearing that way due to how they place weight on their feet. Instead help by clipping their nails as short as you safely can, and getting all the dead skin off that you can without exposing too much fresh, soft tissue. It can take time to get used to really looking at the feet and judging what to debride or exfoliate and what to leave alone. I really need to write a blog on caring for canine foot pads, huh?!
    Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
    www.ChrisSertzel.com

  9. #9
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    Jul 2010
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    Alberta, Canada
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    Thank you, and yes please to the blog!

  10. #10
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    [IMG]http://img.tapatalk.com/d15b6b94-9390-46f8.jpg[/IMG

    Like this ?

  11. #11
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    Jan 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by ItzaClip! View Post
    [IMG]http://img.tapatalk.com/d15b6b94-9390-46f8.jpg[/IMG

    Like this ?
    ???!!!
    Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
    www.ChrisSertzel.com

  12. #12
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    Jul 2010
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    Alberta, Canada
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    Sorry Pic didn't work.

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