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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    254

    Default vet grooming client tipping

    i just started working at a vet clinic but am already noticing - these people don't tip well! and it is not an issue of them not being happy because i've gotten good feedback so far.

    so - has anyone else noticed, vet grooming clients don't tip as well? my last job before this was at a pet store/boutique and i got GREAT tips. now, not so much!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    San Clemente, CA
    Posts
    760

    Default

    Are you able to interact with your customers? Do they know who you are? I think if customers have face to face interaction with the groomer you will get more tips.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA
    Posts
    59

    Default

    two other things you might want to try is a sign that says "Tips are welcomed and appriciated" you can get that from barkleigh productions. Also have the vet staff ask is they would like to leave any extra for the groomer. But I have to agree with Lovemylilies, one on one interaction is always the best.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    425

    Default

    I work at a vet clinic and we have some people that tip but for the most part they don't. Before you try any signs or anything be sure and check with the owner. Ours won't let us.


    lisa

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    254

    Default

    actually yes i interact with every single one of them, both before and after the groom.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    215

    Default

    Our clients rarely tip. I don't know if it's our area, or that we are in a vet clinic. Anyway, I don't depend on tips, and just enjoy them when they come.

    Tipping has always been an odd thing to me. If you go to a place, and agree to get a service for a fee, why in the heck should anyone expect you to add an additional amount on. I mean, you don't add a tip when you go to a grocery store, or to your insurance agent, or to a computer repair center, so why hair dressers, manicurists, dog groomers, etc.

    And I am so over restaurants being allowed to use what amounts to slave labor (2.13 per hour), and expect patrons to foot the rest of the bill. I was a waitress for some time, and felt that the employer got way more than they deserved out of the deal.

    Now, that being said, I am a tipper, and intend to continue when I receive good service. However, I don't believe it should be expected, and I totally disagree with requesting it with a sign. Please don't boo me, this is only an opinion, and trust me, a very humble one. If you do the job that you agreed to do for the amount of money that you agreed upon, then that should suffice, and any tips will just be gravy. Be sure to set your prices high enough in the first place.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    707

    Default

    I have worked at three vet hospitals during my grooming career and have always been tipped well. I only time I didn't was when someone was pocketing them and as soon as she left the tips started again. There are times when you go a few weeks without one tip and then it seems that everyone tips. You said that you just started working at the clinic, so give it time. Maybe once they get to know you better, the tips will come. Good luck.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    223

    Default

    I have never done well with tips when I worked at vet offices. I always had a great, personal relationship with the clients and provided quality service. It just seems like they don't think about it. I have never been allowed to have a tip jar at a vets office.

    Kat

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    San Clemente, CA
    Posts
    760

    Default

    I find that new customers don't often tip until their second or third appointment. If you just started working there, give it a little time and continue interacting with them.

    However, tips should not be expected.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Saint Pete Beach, Florida, United States
    Posts
    1,034

    Default

    I agree, it can take a few visits for people to tip. A sign, if allowed could help. Lots of social interaction with people helps too, I too like the idea of whomever is ringing them out asking, "did you want to leave a tip." I started at a new boutique when I moved from IN to FL 2 years ago, and was surprised to see "groomer gratuity" envelopes right by the register. Honestly, I was a little concerned, and thought "gee, that's a bit much." But it helped. Some people don't tip, and I was fine with that, all pets treated the same. But I can say last year I made an additional 1/3 ON TOP of what my W2 gross income was in tips. My clients were very very happy, many went from tipping $5 a year ago to $10 the past year, others went from no tip to tipping - and those envelopes were always there. As they got to know me, and I got to know their pets, they tipped, or tipped better. I left that job March 1, and even though leaving many even tipped extra as a "moving on" present! Crazy!

    When I worked for vets it took more time for people to tip, it takes a relationship being built, lots of hands on/interaction with clients.

    Quote Originally Posted by alphipsu View Post
    I find that new customers don't often tip until their second or third appointment. If you just started working there, give it a little time and continue interacting with them.

    However, tips should not be expected.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Northern Utah
    Posts
    10,598

    Default

    I did pretty well when I worked at the animal hospital. I made much better tips there than I did elsewhere. Now at home I'm making about the same amount as I did at the animal hospital.

    Tammy in Utah
    Groomers Helper Affiliate

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    The Nuthouse
    Posts
    201

    Default

    I've worked at a few vets and rarely got tips. Although I do try to meet with my clients at either drop off or pick up, many times they come and go when I'm not there. for instance, I'm can't be at work before 9, and most of my clients have already dropped off by then. Also, if a client is boarding their pet or come to pick up after I'm gone for the day, I may not see them at all that day! I'm not even sure how much of a difference that really makes because I have met all of my regular clients at some point in time, so they do know who I am.

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