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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    266

    Default Is there a gentle, yet effective way to demat?

    I can't use a slicker brush to get out these mats, so I use a mat-breaker type thing and a comb. I try to be gentle with it, but it still hurts the dog. I don't demat very much; if there is too much matting, or they're too close to the skin, then I just tell the owner we need to go really short and start over.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, United States
    Posts
    18

    Default Not really

    The only real way of gently demating a dog that i know of is to shave out the mats any type of pulling can cause the dog some pain depending on how sever the mat is and how sensitive the dog is.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    3,305

    Question Yes, please share, I'm curious, too.

    At my new job, we aren't allowed to use a mat breaker or mat comb.. just a slicker brush and comb. On Saturday I did two American Eskimos.. nice dogs.. beautiful.. but super thick tangled hair. I brushed before the bath.. which is also discouraged.. it wastes time and time is money I hear. Then I used the LOUD dryer (got my ear plugs today) to blow the hair apart. It took me a long time to completely comb and brush them out. I finally took my comb and used the end of it, to break apart the tangles!

    Debbie

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    469

    Default

    Get a Les Poochs mat zapper brush (red one) and some Magic Touch Formula 3 (from Cherrybrook) works like a charm on most mats. Start at the end of the mat (farthest away from skin) and work your way towards the skin. I always keep my hand under the mat or between the mat and the skin.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,761

    Default

    Humanely dematting? I think it is called a clipper blade. If you are talking about limited areas of matting, then the comb, slicker and thinning shears would help. Do a little thininng (like 1-2 snips) then comb and slicker again. I would do this to tails, toes and maybe a beard, but behind ears is definitely clipped!

    You should bath first, and use you H/V on the matts while the dog is all soapy. H/V thoroughly, then rebathe (do not rinse). Once again H/V thoroughly. Then rinse and use a conditioner, and H/V after you have let it sit on the dog. This will simplify your job!! It is also much easier on the dog! I did a pom like this on Saturday. She had a load of packed in under coat that a yr. ago I would've brushed out prior to her bath. This was so easy and efficient!

    good luck,
    sittingpretty

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,236

    Default

    It depends. When they're in the bath and soaped up, sometimes running a pin brush through the coat removes tangles and small mats easily and painlessly.
    The true meaning of life is to plant trees, under whose shade you do not expect to sit. ~Nelson Henderson

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    6,260

    Default

    The quickest and most humane way to demat a dog is shaving them down.

    Lazy owners cause matted dogs. I see no reason why groomers should be expected to fit three months of brushing into one grooming session. And, as no good deed goes unpunished, if you brush the dog out once it will be your job to take over and do forever. And I ain't going there.

    If the owner has no problem with letting the dog evolve into a holy mess, I have no problem with rectifying the problem with a #7F.

    I brush out tails, ears and face on a badly matted dog. The rest gets clipped off. If the owner doesn't like it, too bad. The owner can invest in some elbow grease and take care of their dog better between groomings. If they do that, or bring the dog in as often as needed for us to take care of the dog, they can have as much coat as they want on Buffy.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Westminster, Maryland
    Posts
    380

    Agree

    I second what Doubledogdare has to say! Why punish the animal for the owner's neglect?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    6,809

    Default

    I do dematting and I feel that dematting done properly should not hurt. If the only way to get the matts out will hurt then it's time to shave.
    I use Show Seasons Detangle, magic stuff really. Spray it into the matt, hit it with a little heat with my conair yellow dog dryer. Then I take my Les Pooch brush and gently tap and tug. It do little parts at a time until it is eventually out. Sometimes I will use thinning shears. Some will say "boo hiss" to that, but it's my choice and I have not found it causes the pets to matt up any more or any faster. If I can save the coat, prevent the dog from being upset, and make the client happy, then I'll do it. I will not do anything that will cause pain. Sometimes even when the coat is salvageable but the dog just can't tolerate that length of brushing again, time for a shave.
    What a caterpillar considers the end of his world, we call a butterfly.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    11,029

    Default

    I am confused why you cannot use a slicker to demat with cause HONESTLY that is what I use 99% of the time.....start at the bottom and outside and work your way in. Starting at the skin will hurt and take three times as long.
    My Blog The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    5,059

    Default Sometimes "no"

    Look, you can use all the conditionser, mat-zappers, etc. and some dogs are going to feel it and hate it. There are "solid" dogs and "delicate" dogs. We know the most delicate breeds (and American Eskimos are usually right up there, Daesue) and most of the time it is not worth spending more time and effort for them because it is too much torture for them.

    I have not been sold on Les Poochs brushes for my regular work, but I will say that I keep trying them on different things, and whichever one I have (not the mat-zapper) can seperate matting amazingly well, being easier on the dog - so I like that aspect, for sure. BUT - it's all extra time, and I am definitely one for not wasting that time on dogs that the owners just can't/won't maintain.

    Cutting out, thinning and/or shaving or the most humane, no contest.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    5,059

    Default Want to clarify

    What I posted at the end does not mean that it is always inhumane to demat. I can demat dogs that many others can't, and they sit or lie calmly on the table, more or less bored with the procedure, because I can do it effectively yet gently. I can sometimes do this with a dog that was hyper-reactive with someone else, but not always - it is the dog's sensitivity level that determines whether he can be calm, and dogs - like people - have different sensitivity levels.

    Of course, training is a factor, but rarely the main one, it seems to me.

    Just about 6 weeks ago I dematted 2 Poodle mixes for double my usual grooming fee. Both were good, and the owner promised to bring them monthly. They have already returned for a bath and tidy, and the owners LOVE that they are fluffy/fuzzy and cute, not "Poodle-Y". (Well, one is mostly Maltese, probably, but pretty large and solid, so I dematted his rabbity coat, too, lol.) But I will probably never demat them again if they were to go off schedule, because my usual rule is: Once per dog IF it can be humanely done (and if they are paying me, or maybe if I'm just bored...)

    So I think that mainly, groomers should not consider dematting as a "normal" part of grooming - it is a specialty, and is time-consuming, and must be used only in some circumstances on some dogs.

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