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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,116

    Default I groom aggressive dogs

    but I have one dog in particular that has a bag of tricks greater than Felix. He has a way of getting off a muzzle in 2 seconds, somehow, and he will bite, faster than s%%%. Can any of you recommend of the BEST type of muzzle for this? Something impossible to get off? I've been doing this a long time but this dog is amazing! Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA
    Posts
    59

    Default

    I pesonally use MC Romani's Support vest. When they are suspended above the grooming table and their legs just dangel they seem to be more comefortable. I would also try using a muzzel harness attached to the grooming arm if the support vest is not feasable. Third if you have a helper have that person distract the dog while you are grooming either with treats or just talking to it tell the dog by name how a good dog they are. These always work for me

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    248

    Default

    I groomed a dog a chow std poodle cross named poochy.Will never forget the dog. Very friendly. But touch his nails. He would hit you so hard. You could only tell you had a hole in your hand by looking at it. I still bare the scar. Poochy gave no warning. gave me a dog smile the entire time. I was going to refuse the dog. But the owner was so nice. So I tried poochy again. Nailed me right through the muzzle. I was going to refuse him.The owner was too nice. Each time now I did raise the price. So I get poochie again. I put two muzzles on him. You know how they progressively get larger. Poochy still could get to me. 3 muzzles was the charm. He could not slip three muzzles they were progressively larger in size. I monitored the tongue and breathing and we both did just fine.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Picayune, MS
    Posts
    579

    Default

    Lol, I just banned my first little dog ever the other day for aggressiveness. Little shihtzu, couldn't keep ANY muzzle on (I have not tried the air muzzle), could only shave him up to his neck. I had him tied up like you would with a groomers helper (I don't have one yet) with his face up against the bar and his butt secured with another loop in the opposite direction so he couldn't hurt his neck from the thrashing his body about... *sigh* He ended up doing a ninja flip on the way to the bath tub, and when I went to catch him before he hit the ground he sunk his teeth into my right hand pointer finger, cracking the nail. Needless to say, I won't be grooming him anymore and since I was his last shot, he's off to the vet for sedated grooming or the endless sleep. He was abused and I feel so bad for him, but he tears his mom up too and can't be around other dogs. Too much.

    I groom aggressive dogs, and I work with NO sedation because it can make things worse. If the dog is only bad for the groom, try a groomers helper to protect you and you shouldn't need a muzzle, but if he's crazy for everything, don't make my mistake! It might be time to pass him off to the vet. Those Houdini dogs that slip out of muzzles slip out of ALL muzzles. Basket, soft, whatever. The only muzzle I can't speak for is the air muzzle, but that only works for small doggies to my understanding. You might even try an E collar, but that only gives you range protection. Good luck and be safe!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    New York,
    Posts
    39

    Default

    My hubby specializes in aggressive dogs.. He gets some really good ones let me tell you... We have found that if you put a cone around the dogs nest when it has a muzzle on its harder for them to get the muzzle off.. Another option without muzzling is put the cone around the dogs head or have the owner do it before they leave and take a small towel and wrap it around inside the cone around the dogs head, sometimes it calms them down enough where they can tolerate the groom.. just some simple suggestions. I like the basket muzzles from Ryan's Pet they seem to do the trick 90% of the time.. Hope this helps!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Chico
    Posts
    2,659

    Default

    It depends on his muzzle. If he has a shepherd type muzzle, I like the plain old strap behind the head with a parachute clip mesh ones. For a shortnosed dog, like some bully's, I use basket muzzles.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    763

    Skeptical how about a basket muzzle

    I really only groom one dog that is a little aggressive ( a shitzu) :} and she can get a regular muzzle off or bit thru it. I was thinking about getting a basket one... wonder if that would help?? Maybe some other groomers can chime in on the basket muzzle it looks like at least they can bite thru it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    297

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by babbrook View Post
    I groomed a dog a chow std poodle cross named poochy.Will never forget the dog. Very friendly. But touch his nails. He would hit you so hard.
    I am proud of my reputation for being able to handle the difficult dogs.... have had so many really good dogs that have really bad toenail issues, this is the easiest problem to address imho. First, get good with a dremel, some of these dogs have been quicked and are unforgiving. They will often tolerate dremel once they realize it's not the same as before..... it can be challenging for the first time or two but I've found that by the third time they are usually quite fine.

    The trick is to properly restrain the dog so that it is standing normally with head up... think a show-dog type stack. Adjust the noose so the dog can not reach it's feet but not too high, the dog must be comfortable standing. Snap a LIPS type attachment from bottom of noose to grooming arm so dog can not spin. Have second person distract the dog with gentle but secure stroking. If the dog trys to snap at your hands while grinding it will receive an immediate correction that it just gave itself and your hands are out of harms way. Oh yes.... learn to do feet near their natural level, the ground. Dogs are smart, bottom line is that they just want to get through the process as quickly as you do but don't rush it either, calm and assertive works the best We also do nails first on difficult dogs and get that out of the way so they don't spend the rest of the groom anticipating it too!!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Inland Empire
    Posts
    3,145

    Default

    The air muzzle seems to be the best bet, depending on type of dog.
    There are 3 different kinds of people in this world: Dog people, cat people, and rational people who don't have a problem liking two things at the same time.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Southeast Michigan
    Posts
    200

    Default air muzzle

    So far, the air muzzle has not worked well for me. I've had dogs fling it off in the blink of an eye. Cats do it all the time too.
    Anyone else have this issue or am I doing something wrong? It's certainly frustrating when you consider how much these things cost!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    399

    Default

    There's that line in the sand you have to determine through experience and listening to your gut. I'm not as inclined anymore to working real hard to wrestle them through to the end. It just isn't worth it. I don't have to prove anything to anyone. I get upset, the pet gets upset, I could get hurt(bitten or injured back), pet could get hurt(cut, stressed to the point of death). I charge for the degree of trouble, but at the end of the day, no money is worth dealing with a pet intent on doing damage. Some pets either need to go to the vet and be anesthetized for the groom or be put to sleep. It becomes a liability issue. What if a child tried to do something similar to the pet, like picking up a foot? When we as groomers go out of our way to groom a bad tempered dog, we are in a way telling the owner that their dog maybe isn't that bad.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    SE Wisconsin
    Posts
    393

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by preciousfurs View Post
    So far, the air muzzle has not worked well for me. I've had dogs fling it off in the blink of an eye. Cats do it all the time too.
    Anyone else have this issue or am I doing something wrong? It's certainly frustrating when you consider how much these things cost!
    With the air muzzle, you should be able to just barely get your finger tip in between the muzzle and the dog/cat's neck. Any looser and they can fling it.

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