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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    116

    Huh Informal Water Bowl Survey

    A little research on the web shows that water bowls should be ceramic or stainless steel, but NEVER plastic, in order to avoid tear stains on dogs. But my dogs drink from plastic bowls and not one has even the slightest staining. One of my weekly clients has a havapeke with terrible staining from the eyes and around his mouth, and he drinks only from a stainless steel bowl. He's bathed every week so cleanliness is not the issue.

    Just curious as to what others have experienced with their own dogs and tear/saliva stains vs. type of water bowl used. I can't help but wonder if steel bowls leach iron atoms into the water which in turn oxidize into rusty stains on dog faces.

  2. #2
    Gracy Rose Guest

    Default

    I have never heard plastic to cause staining but it can irritate the nose causing dryness, cracking and discoloration.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Chico, CA
    Posts
    2,993

    Default

    Plastic dishes are prone to damage and scratching around the rim of the bowl. Over time, these scratches get deeper and deeper and begin to collect bacteria, no matter how well they are washed. The bacteria proliferates and eventually can cause problems for your pets, i.e. feline acne on kitty chins, among other things. I have never heard of a direct correlation between eye and muzzle staining and plastic dishes, but it stands to reason that yeast bacteria could also collect and grow on the bowl, which would cause some of the problems to which you're referring.

    Play it safe and stick with stainless steel. It's easy to wash, easy to decontaminate, and lasts damn near forever.
    Guard well within yourself that treasure, kindness. Know how to give without hesitation, how to lose without regret, how to acquire without meanness.
    George Sand (1804 - 1876)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Just left of center stage.right next to the dogs
    Posts
    1,973

    Default My dogs drink from ceramic

    But When my girl was sick all three drank from Lixit so her beard would stay dry. Plastic bottle. The three never had beard or eye stains.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,204

    Default

    I use a glass pyrex bowl and wash it daily. I used to use a enamel pot, but got worried about it leaching metal or chemicals into the water. Neither of my dogs have eye stains, but don't know if it's cause they are just mutts. Seems the dogs who have probs with eyes stains are always the little pure breeds. I have heard using bottled water in some areas of the country might help prevent eyes stains due to the iron contet of the local water??? Not sure if it's true.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Broken Arrow, ok
    Posts
    349

    Default

    I have a little staining on my dog now but I have to use a plastic non spill plastic travel bowl to keep the cats from playing in the water and pawing it out on the floor.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Texas, By Golly!
    Posts
    5,603

    Default

    Plastic bowls can cause your dog's nose to fade.
    "We are all ignorant--we merely have different areas of specialization."~Anonymous
    People, PLEASE..It's ONLY a website!~Me

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,764

    Laugh Water Bowls, Plastic-vs- ?

    This really is about water bowls....I thought it was creatively talking about some dog drinking out of the toilet! HAH !

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    2,954

    Default

    OK I have to ask, how does plastic cause dryness, cracking and discoloration? I only use plastic bowls for traveling, but I'm interested in why plastic does this to there nose.
    "No matter how little money and how few possesions you own, having a dog makes you rich." - Louis Sabin

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    2,639

    Default

    Plastic is more porous and therefore more likely to hold bacteria. I used to use plastic water dishes and it became the reason my dane developed severe acne on her chin. I have never heard about the tearstains. I personally think that has more to do w/ diet and allergies. I use a stainless steel mixing bowl I bought at wally world, cheaper and bigger than your typical "doggy dish" from a pet store.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    1,479

    Default

    Don't know the why's, but yes, plastic bowls can cause the dogs to lose the pigmentation on their noses and lips, causing them to then be pink. This is among a handful of other problems the plastic bowls can cause. Most show-dog breeders have known this for years. Plastic bowls can also cause chin acne in cats. I have always used stainless steel bowls or ceramic with my dogs and changed my cats's bowls a couple of years ago when one of the cats began getting sores around his neck. Switched bowls and the sores all cleared up and have not re-appeared in a year and a half's time. However I have NOT ever heard of the plastic bowls affected the tear staining. I have always considered that more of a water problem, i.e. how much iron does the dog's drinking water contain. Our area has alot of iron in it, so many owner's will use bottled drinking water for their dogs and they now have nice white faces.
    Lisa VanVleet, RVT

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    3,225

    Red face

    I use ceramic or stainless just to be on the safe side too. I must post a picture of my dogs main bowl later, It is a big ceramic cookie jar that had the lid broken, and very cute on the outside,decorated with gnomes,fairies etc.
    "Everyone needs something to beleive in..I beleive I need another Poodle"
    Quote:Cath

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