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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States, 108161062545219, Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Posts
    398

    Default Shaving down short-haired dogs

    I'm just curious if anyone tries to dissuade customers from shaving down their short-haired dogs. I've tried offering deshedding treatments when it's a shedding issue, but they don't seem interested. It hurts my heart to think of those poor dogs out in the sun without their coats for protection!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    ontario canada
    Posts
    782

    Default

    Unfortunately it happens. If you don't do it they will just take their money and their dogs someplace else to have it done. All you can do is educate them as to the effects of leaving their dogs out in the hot sun and hopefully they will listen. Just yesterday i did a boxer/pointer mix and a basset hound. That is what they wanted. Most of my clients just don't like seeing all the hair on their floors, they are not irresponsible and don't leave their dogs out all day. Ultimately you know your clients and if you feel that for some reason they would leave their pets in the hot sun then you have the option to refuse to do it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    3,615

    Default

    If they ask, I do it. Let's face it, people want certain things and it's not my JOB to tell them they can't have it. As long as it doesn't put the dog in harms way, I give them what they want.

    In an ideal world, all dogs would be well groomed, loved, and not abused or neglected. What does it matter if the owner wants to shave them down? At least they are taking care of them!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    188

    Default

    This is a pet peve of mine. No pun intended. LOL Most ppl do it because of shedding which I explain. It's not going to stop the shedding. If you get them shaved the same ammount of hair will fall out but now it's going to be blunt and more likely to stick in your skin. This doesnt seem to change anyone's mind.

    Niagirl is right. If you don't do it someone else will.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    5,059

    Default Lots of shaved shorthairs

    Here in Tampa people LOVE to scalp their dogs in the summer - Labs, Akitas, Goldens, etc. (Heck, I even do a Yorkie where they like everything off with a #10, including the head - looks like a black and tan Chihuahua, lol.)

    Most of these folks DO keep their dogs inside except for outings, so the sun is not a huge concern.

    I shaved my Cattle Dog, and he looks very spiffy, actually. Those short-haired dogs can have LONG "short" hairs on them! Now his dappling shows nice and sharp.

    And shedding is not the only reason, as I've said before - many of these dogs are swimming dogs in the summer, so this helps them dry quicker.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Auburn, Indiana, United States
    Posts
    276

    Default

    I shave what ever the customer wants, although I don't go any shorter than a #7 forward or a #4 in reverse.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    5,059

    Default That was me until -

    Quote Originally Posted by kayc View Post
    I shave what ever the customer wants, although I don't go any shorter than a #7 forward or a #4 in reverse.
    Yeah, #7 is what I did for years, but I remember that some people would ask if I could go shorter, and I really didn't like the "bald" look of a #10 on many coats, so I would say no. But now I have done #7F reverse and #10 forward (pretty well equals each other), and although it is too short for my liking on many dogs, the owners are very happy! Never thought I'd do it, but....

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    136

    Default

    I am lucky to be in the position where I can refuse to do certain hair cuts. I will not take the chance of shaving a dog who's hair will be ruined by the clip (it will possibly grow back in all crazy.) I basically do it because I dont want my name on it. We've all seen those goldens who have been shaved and their hair is now patchy and wirey and all messed up. I picture what the owners will tell people six months after the clip.
    "OMG! What happened to your dog??"
    "Well, I took him to Rachel at **** and his hair has never been the same since! She RUINED his coat! Now my dog is ruined!!"

    Owners do not take responsibility for their choices in clips. If a dogs hair grows back in wrong, it is always OUR fault, not theirs for choosing to shave their dog. If someone else wants to put their name on a clip, that's their choice. I will not.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Edmond, OK
    Posts
    1,559

    Default

    I figure that I as the groomer, hired to do the groom, isn't responsible for health issues in the dog that interfere with coat growth. At this stage of the game, I don't want to turn away clients unless I absolutely have to, and I will happily take their money for shaving their dog. I've always encouraged deshedding services, but if they want them shaved, I'm not sending them to the place down the street when I have several sets of clippers!

    I think that we as groomers tend to think the general public is horrified by shaved dogs, but in reality, they are much more likely to be impressed. Owners like to brag about their dogs and have a tendency to spread your name in a good way. If the owners are happy, they'll share that.

    If the dog has a problem, most of that battle is how you deal with it. Taking time to explain things to the owner goes a very long way. I've never seen a person go bald from a haircut, and I've never seen a dog go bald from a haircut. However, certainly, dogs that are covered in a thick coat of hair can have a hair growth problem going on that simply isn't revealed until that hair is trimmed away.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    1,281

    Default

    tuque, I pretty much feel the same. Although I will do it if the client insists. But I always tell them that I don't reccomend it. People just don't understand that dogs have a different cooling system that humans. I try to at least talk them into Puppy cuts using a #1 or #2 att. Someone posted on another thread that if the coat grows back patchy, or does not grow back in some areas, that there is an underlying health issue with the dog. I also used to work with a gal that shaved her lab all the time. It started having some bad skin issues. I felt that removing the hair, which is the dogs protection from the environment, is what was causing the skin problem. I don't know if it was an allergy, or if the shaving itself was irritating the skin. I know that if you repeatedly cause irritation to perfectly healthy skin, you create problems. (Keratoplastic action). I talked her into letting it grow out. And the skin issue cleared up.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    The Northeast
    Posts
    2,620

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pudel View Post
    tuque, I pretty much feel the same. Although I will do it if the client insists. But I always tell them that I don't reccomend it. People just don't understand that dogs have a different cooling system that humans. I try to at least talk them into Puppy cuts using a #1 or #2 att. Someone posted on another thread that if the coat grows back patchy, or does not grow back in some areas, that there is an underlying health issue with the dog. I also used to work with a gal that shaved her lab all the time. It started having some bad skin issues. I felt that removing the hair, which is the dogs protection from the environment, is what was causing the skin problem. I don't know if it was an allergy, or if the shaving itself was irritating the skin. I know that if you repeatedly cause irritation to perfectly healthy skin, you create problems. (Keratoplastic action). I talked her into letting it grow out. And the skin issue cleared up.
    I thought I had read somewhere that these problems can be caused by shaving some breeds because when you cut the hair you clog the pores. I think it was an issue of groomer to groomer on post grooming alopecia but not positive.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Bmore
    Posts
    3,113

    Default

    eh, I figure it's their dog, and it's not hurting the dog.
    I will remind people about the possibility of sun burn, heat, etc just as I do if I have to shave a white dog because of mats.
    And I have beagles and have shaved them occasionally. It DOES make a difference in the shedding. Sure, they still shed, but it's nice tiny hairs.
    Scratch a dog and you'll find a permanent job. ~Franklin P. Jones

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