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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    250

    Default Shortening a long coat...just a little bit

    Can I get some advice on how to shorten a long coat just a small amount? I have a young soft coated wheaten coming in this week. The mom says that she estimates the hair to be about five inches long and just wants "a trim". I think an F comb is going to go way too short for her taste, but I am not sure how to go about doing a good all over trim on hair that long. Advice? Instructions? Diagrams!? Help!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    2,120

    Default

    Yikes! 5 inches long? I hope this doggy is in good, non-matted shape for your sake. If you want to just trim off a half inch or so, just trim it the way you would trim human hair. Comb the hair up or out, depending on where on the body you are, in sections and cut the ends with straight shears. To keep it even, do not pull on the hair, just gently hold it out to it's full length. If you pull it out to cut, you will end up with shorter and longer areas. For the hair that hangs off the belly, knees, chest, etc. just comb down and trim along the edges with straights or curves. When you are done trimming, fluff the coat out and use thinners or blenders to soften any marks, or, use thinners or blenders to do the initial cutting. I have a great pair of Oster blenders that cuts a lot of hair per cut, so I usually use those when hand scissoring a long coated yorkie or shih tzu.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,116

    Default

    This will be a full scissor cut. Bath, dry (demat) fluff dry to straighten the coat. Start at the top line. Scissor off to form the line you want. Remember use your eyes to give a balanced look.Use a long clip on comb for the body if you can, it's ok to have the body a little shorter than the legs, it balances the dog a little better. Comb the hair up on the legs and scissor down blending the legs into the body.Do all the legs in the same manner and then comb them all down cut off little sticky outies, comb them out and do the same thing. They should look smooth every direction you comb them in. Make sure you don't taper the legs at the foot, leave them full. Take your time, this may easily be a 4 hour job when you're not used to doing full scissors. This is great practice, enjoy it. Hopefully this is a nice wheaten, they tend to be a PITA (in my opinion). I'm sure others on the board can give additional direction.
    Next!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    3,225

    Talking

    Boy that is going to be time consuming,if the longest SS comb is still too short.. I bet she might like it ,and it will be fairly long still if you use the longest SS on brushed down coat and go with the lay of hair lifting off as you get to blend lines to leave a bit of firnishing fullness. Or you can layer the hair like a hairdresser does by lifting with your comb,and trimming from there, I have done that a lot to get a nice longish look on drop coat dogs,but they were small. If you do layer,I find it easier to start top of back near the tail and work ahead. If you have chunkers,or motion scissors that would help. After top line lenght is how you want lift the next layer down up to meet the part you scissored,this is the hard part. the rest you can scissor with your comb to stand coat off a bit,and freestyle scissor. That is a fair bit of work. If you have time to practise go for it, it looks really goodI will see if I have a groom done like that with a coat that is neither nor like a wheatie's. I still think the client would probably be happy with careful clipper work done with the long ss comb.(I hope)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    3,225

    Talking Found some!

    Here is a thick curly haired yorkie that mom wanted just an 1" off. I carded her lots to get out undercoat and flatten . Then the layer method after a good stretch dry. But of course she is a lot smaller than a wheatie!. . A good carding with the coat king to pull out lots of undercoat,should help too. Good Luck Sorry I think the before pic is in the middle of afters.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    2,605

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PAWS View Post
    Yikes! 5 inches long? I hope this doggy is in good, non-matted shape for your sake. If you want to just trim off a half inch or so, just trim it the way you would trim human hair. Comb the hair up or out, depending on where on the body you are, in sections and cut the ends with straight shears. To keep it even, do not pull on the hair, just gently hold it out to it's full length. If you pull it out to cut, you will end up with shorter and longer areas. For the hair that hangs off the belly, knees, chest, etc. just comb down and trim along the edges with straights or curves. When you are done trimming, fluff the coat out and use thinners or blenders to soften any marks, or, use thinners or blenders to do the initial cutting. I have a great pair of Oster blenders that cuts a lot of hair per cut, so I usually use those when hand scissoring a long coated yorkie or shih tzu.
    This is exactly what I do too. You will find it is actually pretty fun!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    250

    Default

    Thanks for all the advice...I just wish that I had ever once trimmed a person's hair so that I could see the process of picking up layers and trimming that way. I hope that I am not in over my head...not only do I agree that wheatens are challenging dogs, but this one has only ever been groomed at home...and has long hair! Yikes!!! I am seven and a half months pregnant and really don't want to have a wrestling match or deal with a pelted dog...or four hours of trying to shorten the coat by hand! Wish me luck everybody!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    The Northeast
    Posts
    2,620

    Default Motion Scissors?

    Poodleluv what are motion scissors?

    What do you use for chunkers? How many teeth?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    688

    Default

    You know it might turn out that she was "groomed at home" and has solid 5" thick mat.
    Hope not, but maybe you could talk her into a shorter haircut with snap on?
    Layered trims are not that difficult but it will take a really long time on the SWT.
    My first yorkie took me over an hour to scissor like that.
    On other hand if the dog has 5" of coat and she likes it you might be able to get away with just neatening up the countour of the dog.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    292

    Default

    one word......CHUNKERS!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    N mich
    Posts
    1,560

    Default

    for type of thing I resort to human hair stylist technique .make a part in the hair going across the withers holding up the hair desired to be trimmed between 2 fingers then trim.think of how your hairdresser hold your hair during your trim for an idea of how its done them move to the next section do the same thing but this time you will hold a small amount of what you have already cut to have exact same length.yes its time consuming charge extra for this style once you have the set length on the dogs back its much easier to trim the rest as you normally would.hope this makes sense to you.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    3,225

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by Dog Daze View Post
    Poodleluv what are motion scissors?

    What do you use for chunkers? How many teeth?
    My sharpener and sales team Adam's New Edge,where I bought mine said they ar e supposed to called motion scissors. Whatever they are I am in love with the darn things ,and end up using them for something on almost every groom, even my show poodle, whose colour I find hard to get a perefect finish on,I had her banded,and ready early,and started gently working around the jacket tipping,and they did an amzing job of making my scissor work look velvet smooth. I think I will just call them chunkers,and join the crowd! They are big scissors 81/2" or 9",and like real coarse thinners,with little sharp hatchet shape things. Mine are made by Geib. Bev had never seen them before,and picked them up to pick at stickie outies on M.J. trim,and was in love with them right away too. For a hard job like we are discussing here,they make life SO mcuh easier,and are fun to use. Why do we have different names for them? anyone know?

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