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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    548

    Mad Lumps and bumps on older dogs

    How do you deal with those lumps and bumps on the older dogs? The owners always say they are nothing but they worry me. I had one yesterday with two large lumps on the back of the neck- they were the size of a golf ball.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    59

    Default They worry me too

    I always ask the client if the Vet has seen the lumps and bumps. If no, I suggest they do so. Is there more we can do?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Belle River, ON Canada
    Posts
    107

    Default

    I have an almost 15 year old Lhasa with many, many lumps and bumps, outer and inner. The vet says they are nothing to worry about, just age, all test results are fine and good. She's actually quite healthy despite them, and some arthritis in her hips and teeth falling out. I have noticed the last 6 mos, she is getting bonier, not skinnier, but redistributing her weight. We have an appt. shortly and will have her checked out again.
    I think that those senior citizen lumps and bumps can be fairly harmless, just old age

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    3,280

    Default

    I always point the lumps and bumps out to the owners. They always say it's nothing. Sometimes the risks of having them removed isn't worth it. Especially when there's no guarantee they won't grow back. My poodle has a bunch of fatty lipomas and cysts. Not pretty but harmless.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    1,021

    Default

    I, too, always point them out to clients. Sometimes if the clients are concerned, I just tell them to watch the moles, cysts, etc., in case they get any larger. Many times I can tell if they're not serious, but when I'm not sure, I tell them to have a vet check 'em out. An "old age" mole usually is no concern, unless it opens, oozes, etc. But some cysts need to be biopsed. When I notice any kind of growth on a pet, I always tell the client.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    506

    Default

    I tend to find on the larger breeds(Labs,especially and Shepherds,Goldens,etc.) that there is an abundance of fatty cysts that are not attached to anything under the skin,these don't seem to be an issue. The smaller breeds seem to have nodes that are not moveable under the skin and abnormal shaped exterior growths that have had issues with several of my clients in the past years.Anything different from the previous groom,I let them know in detail.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,162

    Default

    I do mention them to clients as well. My own Golden has bumps on his lumps! He is 12, and at this point, I'm not investigating any new lumps. It is what it is, and as long as he is enjoying life, that's good. At his age, I think it would just be mean to put him through any surgery.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    8,475

    Default

    Many of those lumps are just fatty tumors called lipomas. And they are almost always harmless. The only time we recommend removal is if they're interfering with the dog's ability to move.

    You'd be amazed at how bit they can get, too. I had a Dachshund that had one on his knee. It got to be as big as a softball. Didn't ever bother him, though.

    I do point them out, but most of the time the owners are aware, have had the vet check them out, and when they say it's nothing, I take them at their word, because most of them really are nothing.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Chico, CA
    Posts
    2,993

    Default

    Helly, do you have any idea on what causes lipomas to form, and why certain breeds are more prone to them than others?
    Guard well within yourself that treasure, kindness. Know how to give without hesitation, how to lose without regret, how to acquire without meanness.
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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    8,475

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PuppyFluffer View Post
    Helly, do you have any idea on what causes lipomas to form, and why certain breeds are more prone to them than others?
    I'm not sure there's an easy answer. They seem to be most common in overweight females, and as you know, some breeds are predisposed to getting them. Weight is probably a factor, but who knows what other factors may be involved.

    It is possible for a lipoma to become a malignant liposarcoma, although they're fairly rare, and rarely metastatic. But they infiltrate local muscle and fatty tissue, and can be difficult to remove. For that reason it's important to keep monitoring them over the years. They usually grow back after surgical removal, too.

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