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dogspaw
10-11-09, 05:34 PM
Ok, old college professor always said, the best way to study for a test is to just simply ask whats on it so............

I will be taking the NS part of my NDGAA certification tests in FL in a few weeks. As far as the written part of the test is concerned, anyone have any suggestions or tips for studying? I know, AKC dog book-got that. Notes-got that. Study guide from NDGAA, got that. Anything else?

Kinda getting test anxiety here.

elizo
10-12-09, 04:24 AM
I took the tests about four years ago, so don't know if anything has changed. At that time, Notes was not part of the study materials, just the NDGAA guidelines. What I did was cut up the breed poster, stick the pix of each breed on the front of an index card, then write important facts about the breed on the back (sizes, allowable colors, origins, what were they bred for, disqualifications, etc.) I especially noted anything unusual about the breed or standard (like the fact bulldogs have a ranking of color preference) and the specifications given for the haircuts on the groom dogs (where to start and stop lines, proportions, etc.)...and then I just CRAMMED...alot. I was flipping through cards right up until I walked into the room. The test was 100 questions (that's not a secret or anything, they tell you that) and I think you need an 85 to pass? So you can miss 15 questions...which is a lot of leeway I think. So don't worry...if you have put the effort in and taken good notes on the breeds, you should be ok. They didn't try and 'stump' you with trick questions or anything either....the sheer amount of info on the dogs is what is challenging. The tests were very fair and I found the whole experience very positive. I would definitely recommend going to the workshop too if you can...it helped a lot with the testing process.

dogspaw
10-12-09, 05:50 AM
I did the flash cards with the poster also, works great! As silly as it sounds, I think my biggest problem is that I kinda have a hard time with some things I use to know in and out, backwards and forewards, since I had surgery several months ago. My friend the nurse says its "anistesia brain" (sp) (see!) since I was under for so long. (8hrs ) That and the fact that I have always had test anxiety! (breathe in, breathe out) I worry that there is some huge part of the test im either forgetting to study for or that it never occured to me to study for. I have done fine on the rest, not sure why im freakin. Thanks for the advice.

cattledawg
10-12-09, 06:40 AM
I took all my written tests at one time and did 1 practical on my poodle, that way all I had to do the next time around was the next 3 breed practicals, and that way I already knew I had passed all my writtens, one less thing to worry about.

I found the 100 questions on each group very easy, if you are a dog lover and have been into dogs a long time the questions I think are basic knowledge of breeds.

The one thing I did study for but freaked a little over was the anatomy of the dog, that was hard for me to remember which part was which as I knew the names but had a hard time making sure I labeled them in the proper order.

I NCMG at least 10 yrs ago so not sure what all it includes now, I've heard they are adding handstripping now ?

dogspaw
10-12-09, 07:45 AM
I NCMG at least 10 yrs ago so not sure what all it includes now, I've heard they are adding handstripping now ?

Last I heard was that it was being concidered and if you were not done with the whole process by APF this year you would have to do a practical with a HS dog to complete your NCMG. I am not sure if that has actually been put in place or not. Hmmmm think ill check on that today.

elizo
10-12-09, 01:56 PM
I got something in the mail from them saying that if I wanted to complete the handstripping exam, I would receive an extra certificate saying I had done so, but that it was not going to be necessary in order for me to keep my NCMG. I thought I remembered it would start by Jan 1, 2010 but I could be wrong. I didn't really pay attention because I don't have any handstrip clients and don't really want any. I have studied the theory and attended a bunch of lectures on the subject; I just don't care to go through the trouble of finding a dog and rolling its coat for a couple of months for free and then traveling with it to go get certified. I did read a post on another board where someone thought it was very unfair that people who had done their NCMGs before the handstripping requirement got to keep their status. I guess all I can say to that is, I never worried about how 'hard' the NCMG test was 20 years ago when others got certified! Just concentrate on what YOU need to do!

tmenne
10-12-09, 04:34 PM
I have always wondered about the writtens. Can anyone give me an example of a question they may ask. I have studied the akc book but I can never figure out what is important information and what is not.

pixiedust
10-12-09, 04:48 PM
I did mine about 15 years ago, that was the day I brought Pearl home. My cousin made the 5 hour trip ( each way) with me. I did the flash cards too, all the way there!

epilady
10-18-09, 05:50 AM
are made up of true and false. Breed identification. Pay attention to if the question has a "should" or "could" in it. Take your time, don't second quess yourself. I like the flash card ideas, you will probably learn way more that you need for the test.

henrythe8th
10-18-09, 02:55 PM
question in regards to the flash cards.

Anyone can answer but I would like to direct this question to Epilady (if you are able to give info).

As a certifier, what would your recommendation be for making our own flash cards as a study guide, what would be the most important information to include? And what would be basically a waste of time?

And would this information pertain to all Assocations? NDGAA, ISCC, IPG...only 3 I know exist. please correct me if I am wrong.

epilady
10-18-09, 04:33 PM
NDGAA. Study each group, Sporting, Non-Sporting and Terrier in depth. The whole point of the written test is to make you familiar with each dog in the group. There is no information that is a waste of time. Study the anatomy.
I think people get overly nervous about these tests, try not to. I know a groomer who is on this board who mis-identified a Labrador Retriever. Why? Nerves. She passed.
Elizo has a good outline for the flash cards follow her guidelines for them.
An 85% adverage is what is nessasary to take the Master test.
Handstripping is now a requirement fot the Master test as well. A Master should be able to handstrip don't you think? We have made it easier by allowing mixed breeds for the H/S test.
Attending a workshop is manditory to test. Our workshops are pretty fantastic I hear...

dogspaw
10-18-09, 05:02 PM
Handstripping is now a requirement fot the Master test as well.

Has the handstripping requirement been put into place yet, or will it go into place at the first of the year if you have not earnd you NCMG?

kputman
10-18-09, 05:32 PM
Yep, Elizo's guide is a good outline for ISCC's breed tests, too. At the dermatech level, breed tests consist of breed ID (pictures) and coat characteristics and colors. They are divided into sporting & hound groups, working & terrier groups, and toy, non-sporting & herding groups.

At the master level, you will have questions covering the breed standard size, proportion, topline (level, sloping, etc.?) ear type and/or set, tail type and/or set, disqualifications, etc. Also origin and what they were used for and anything distinguishing or unique about the breed. You might also get some coat characteristics and color questions on the master level tests, but most of them are on the dermatech level tests. At this level, there are four breed tests: Non-Sporting, Sporting, Terrier and All Other Purebreds. For many (but not all) of the breed questions, if you can picture the breed in your mind, you can probably figure out the answer.

The master level tests over techniques (scissoring, hand-stripping, clipper techniques) are pretty basic. Al of that material is covered in the study guide, though. You would need the study guide for the dermatech written tests and the geometrics test at the master level.

epilady
10-19-09, 03:35 AM
I'm pretty sure it's the first of the year.

tmenne
10-19-09, 07:04 PM
So the study guide is really useful? I already made flash cards but I never knew what kind of information to put on them. When there are multiple disqualifications how are you supposed to remember them all? Also some of the breeds origins are unknown or conflicting any suggestions for this. What does coat characteristics mean?

windywaycavaliers
10-19-09, 07:34 PM
I would still get the breed clip charts from NDGAA to study from- they just updated their Poodle breed study guide, and there are questions on the tests directly from the specific info put on these guideline charts. And for the breed DQ stats- I know some of them are breed specific, but mostly it would be concerning overall breed conformation and structural faults.

kputman
10-20-09, 08:32 AM
So the study guide is really useful? I already made flash cards but I never knew what kind of information to put on them. When there are multiple disqualifications how are you supposed to remember them all? Also some of the breeds origins are unknown or conflicting any suggestions for this. What does coat characteristics mean?

You definitely should get the study materials from whichever association you plan to test with. And they are good to have, even if you have already been studying.

ISCC tests on coat characteristics and they are asking about what type of coat each breed has. Is it double coated, wire coated, curly coated, etc.? Are there breed specific specifications for the coat?