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View Full Version : What to use on a really oily dog?



fivecats
02-09-08, 03:46 AM
I have two dogs that I groom every 4 weeks and there fur is so oily it is unbelievable! What shampoo should I use to remove this? I hate to say it, but so far the only thing I find that works well is to use Dawn, but I really would like to find a good shampoo that would remove all this oil.

Debbiedogs
02-09-08, 11:35 AM
Hmmmm, what kind of dogs? Many Yorkies and Schnauzers have a sebhorritic-type (sp?) back and coat problem, and many dogs I have done over the years have fluctuating oiliness due to the same kind of skin problems triggered by allergies and getting an immune system reaction causing excessive oil production and dead skin production.

Anyway, one good product for me has been Selsun Blue SALON formula (seems gentler, more conditioning, and smells nicer that Selsun Blue regular.) Don't use it near the eyes. Dog shampoos that have done well for drying out some oiliness while still being wonderful for skin have been Bio-Groom Oatmeal, Kenic Oatmeal, and sometimes Oxy-Med Oatmeal (I sometimes use Bio-Groom or Kenic, and then do a light final shampoo with Oxy-Med - the combination seems to result in a better look somehow for some oily coats.) Oh yeah - don't use a "surge" to wash these dogs - hand-mix your shampoo so that it is a good ratio so it can work on the oily coat and skin (1 part water to 1 part shampoo should be fluid enough to work with but strong enough to be effective; sometimes I do 2:1) and apply it mixed WITHOUT wetting the coat first. (The dry but oily coat will absorb the shampoo better without being wet first.)

If these dogs are producing oil constantly, they will be oily again in 4 weeks, BUT they should not look oily after grooming. However, my worst oily dog sometimes looks a bit oily after drying when she is in full-blown reaction. Too much heat, strong brushing, "air-drying" - they are all bad on oily coats. You are mobile, so you probably don't have too much heat or too long "air drying" (as I call it). Try the Selsun Blue Salon or the others - nicer to use than dish detergent, and more specific for the problem. (There is D-Grease for dirty/oily coats, but sounds like your clients have a chronic problem that should have a more medicated shampoo.)

Helly
02-09-08, 04:55 PM
I use Grimeinator on most of my oily dogs. I use a benzoyl peroxide shampoo on those that Grimeinator doesn't get as clean as I want. And as strange as it sounds, you need to use some sort of light conditioner or their skin goes into overdrive to replace the sebum you removed.

It's also a good idea to have the client address the issue of diet. Many times a change of diet will effect dramatic improvement in oily skin.

Bearmtn
02-09-08, 09:39 PM
I use Grimeinator on most of my oily dogs. I use a benzoyl peroxide shampoo on those that Grimeinator doesn't get as clean as I want. And as strange as it sounds, you need to use some sort of light conditioner or their skin goes into overdrive to replace the sebum you removed.

It's also a good idea to have the client address the issue of diet. Many times a change of diet will effect dramatic improvement in oily skin.

I use the benzoyl peroxide shampoo too and follow up with conditioning shampoo. Just have to leave the peroxide shampoo on long enough to remove all the oilyness. My husband bathes for me, and he tends to get in a hurry. Works pretty good on the oily cats too.

keyray
02-09-08, 10:16 PM
I use a benzoyl peroxide shampoo on those that Grimeinator doesn't get as clean as I want.

What brand? Is that a type of shampoo you can get at a Vet? Does it actually help to dry out future oiliness. I have a Yorkie that I groom that has huge oiliness issues. She has been through the whole medical route and the only thing that will help is to put her on steroids, which will shortens the dogs life. This is what the owner has related to me. I've tried to come up with a topical solution.

Grimeinator didn't even come close to cutting the oil on this dog. I know I dis Dawn a lot but this is one of the only dogs I will use the Dawn concoction on.

Helly
02-09-08, 11:59 PM
What brand? Is that a type of shampoo you can get at a Vet? Does it actually help to dry out future oiliness. I have a Yorkie that I groom that has huge oiliness issues. She has been through the whole medical route and the only thing that will help is to put her on steroids, which will shortens the dogs life. This is what the owner has related to me. I've tried to come up with a topical solution.

Grimeinator didn't even come close to cutting the oil on this dog. I know I dis Dawn a lot but this is one of the only dogs I will use the Dawn concoction on.

I use Davis Benzoyl Peroxide shampoo. If you had acne as a teen, you know benzoyl peroxide is a common treatment. It not only removes excess sebum, it is keratolytic, meaning it causes dead skin to slough off.

Another ingredient to look for is salicylic acid. It does the same thing as benzoyl peroxide, but isn't quite as drying. If you can't find a shampoo with salicylic acid, you can make your own. Dissolve about 10 regular aspirins in a cup of warm water. Strain out the particulate (that's the white stuff) and add the liquid to the shampoo, or just use it as a rinse.

If you want to suggest it, using diluted Listerine in a spray bottle to freshen the coat between grooms might help, too. Have the owner check with her vet to cover your behind, lol. If the vet approves, it should be ok.

One other remedy; corn starch or corn flour (masa harina). Apply liberally before the bath, brush it in well, then shampoo. A light application of corn starch between groomings would help absorb excessive oil. Dust it on, brush it out. If the owner uses corn starch baby powder, not only will it help freshen the coat, it'll smell nice.

dgpaw
02-16-08, 09:01 PM
For my real greasy and oily dogs I either use Show Seasons degreaser or I use Les Pooch's degreaser, I have found both of them to work well on the coats.
Lisa Leady

Helly
02-17-08, 07:29 AM
I must have been having a brain cramp when I posted earlier. I forgot something, lol.

You can boost the cleaning power of any shampoo by adding baking soda. When I feel I need to, I soap the dog up, then grab the baking soda and work in a good handful or two, depending on the size of the dog.